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 Mafanta: Interview Reveals No Solution for Unity!!
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dbaldeh

USA
933 Posts

Posted - 13 Sep 2010 :  23:01:22  Show Profile  Visit dbaldeh's Homepage Send dbaldeh a Private Message
Congratulation to Maafanta http://maafanta.com/ for such a revealing interview. At the very best if anything the interview reveals that the two opposition leaders have no solution to the stalemate that is going on in the Gambia.

I hear a lot of the same squables and absolutely no clear ideas or suggestion on how to get out of the deadlock.

I was baffled by Mr. Darboe's few attempts to speak to Halifa and or reach our to him in futility as a single mean of finding a solution to a very serious political deadlock on the ground in the Gambia...

With all fairness and respect, there ought to be other means to finding a head way for almost 5 years to this political discussion if the will and determination is there.

On the other hand, I was equally surprised by Halifa lamenting on a Non Partisan Primary without given basis on which these primaries will be conducted. It is one thing to wish to do something and quite another to convince interested parties that it is worth investing in.

Quite frankly, what is being advanced by Halifa on primaries as a solution to the single opposition party leader seems to be very flat and lacks substance. If you are calling for a primary election where it has never existed, and of all opposition political parties to select a single candidate, you ought to give a little more insight on how practical it is to conduct such a primary of voters. Some of the questions that could have been answered:

1. Who is eligible to vote in such a primary where there are no registered party voters?
2. How will the primaries be conducted - each party send representatives or what?
3. Are voting open to even APRC supporters?
4. Who is allowed to contest such a primary base on partisan nomination or will independent candidates be allowed to contest on their own?
5. Which party plafform will the winning candidate contest under?
6. What about voter education on how to go about these primaries where opposition parties are hardly allowed to conduct political rallies?

With all honesty and due respect to Halifa, I think there are more questions left unanswered with this primaries proposal in agenda 2011.

Finally, is Halifa telling us that without a 2-5 year transition rule, PDOIS will not support a coalition? What is more rigid than this position if in fact that is what he is insinuating?

Sadly, though the UDP does not seems to advance any agenda to form any kind of coalition. Yes, they all agreed a coalition is needed, but how would you have a coalition without the ideas on the table?

To be honest, what I get from this interview is a grim picture of the political dialogue in the Gambia. I am convince all the more that we need to let these brand of politicians live their useful life so we can start afresh. They have run out of ideas and have no solution on how to get to the next level... truly sad even though I love both leaders and have lot of respect for them...

What is your analysis of the interview???

http://maafanta.com/HalifaInterviewwithMaafanta.html

http://maafanta.com/OusainuDarboeInterviewwithMaafantaafterUDPCongress.html

Baldeh,
"Be the change you want to see in the world" Ghandi
Visit http://www.gainako.com for your daily news and politics

Senegambia

175 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2010 :  11:37:46  Show Profile Send Senegambia a Private Message
I am not surprised by the slow or maybe delayed reactions to the interview. Typical Halipha style: ain't no question getting a straight forward answer but tedious lengthy analysis. Infact I started with Halipha's interview but had to stop because really it's stuff that can't be digested that fast.

It's a lot of issues that have been touched in the interviews so that makes me wonder how this thread is gonna end up :) One thing I will not forget to say:

I think Darboe should not give up on contacting Sallah again and like dbaldeh said their meeting should be possible if the determination really is intact. I think Sallah should tell us why he is avoiding to meet Darboe on the ground. No amount of cyber debates can be as helpful as a tete-a-tete or face to face goodwill building between the two of them. I was happy to note that contacts with OJ and Mai Fatty are good and hope that continues.

Tesito

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toubab1020



8227 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2010 :  12:03:43  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message

As dbaldeh writes:
"At the very best if anything the interview reveals that the two opposition leaders have no solution to the stalemate that is going on in the Gambia.

I hear a lot of the same squables and absolutely no clear ideas or suggestion on how to get out of the deadlock."

This has been totally self evident from the beginning even to non politicos like me ,the problem is about being WILLING to share personal power, such willingness does no exist.
Politicos try to convince me it does !

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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shaka



996 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2010 :  19:10:43  Show Profile Send shaka a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Senegambia

I am not surprised by the slow or maybe delayed reactions to the interview. Typical Halipha style: ain't no question getting a straight forward answer but tedious lengthy analysis. Infact I started with Halipha's interview but had to stop because really it's stuff that can't be digested that fast.

It's a lot of issues that have been touched in the interviews so that makes me wonder how this thread is gonna end up :) One thing I will not forget to say:

I think Darboe should not give up on contacting Sallah again and like dbaldeh said their meeting should be possible if the determination really is intact. I think Sallah should tell us why he is avoiding to meet Darboe on the ground. No amount of cyber debates can be as helpful as a tete-a-tete or face to face goodwill building between the two of them. I was happy to note that contacts with OJ and Mai Fatty are good and hope that continues.



Why can't you just speak for yourself instead trying to insinuate that you know why and what people choose to react to at any given moment. What do you expect from Mr Sallah? The same boring and substance-free two-liners Mr Darboe is notorious for when it comes to the public debate. I can assure you that if the leader of the biggest political party of any other nation speak in similiar style they will be shot. Only in the Gambia is such mediocrity tolerated. You will never find a more intellectually-lazy party structure than the UDP leadership, despite boasting of having some of the most seasoned academics and intellectuals among it's rank. Mr Sallah in contrast has a handy grasp of facts and events and a bank of knowledge in politics and other domain. He and his group take their time to do some intensive homework before facing the public because of the respect they have for the people as well as dedication to duty. Don't tell me it is a gift that Ousainou Dorboe lacks because he exibits similar eloquent traits in court when he is paid hundreds of thousand or millions of dalasis by his clients to perform. Why is he short-changing the Gambian masses? Because they don't pay?

On your second note, it rather ironic that Darboe should by-pass the PDOIS and instead would rather personally speak to Halifa Sallah alone in private. This is the same Mr Sallah that Mr Darbo had publicly insulted and slandered as insincere and devisive, hailing Sedia Jatta as an honest gentleman in the wake of NADD falling apart. Some of these insults that most likely had later prompt Mr Sallah to relinquish his role as negotiator for PDOIS to Mr Jatta just to temper to the public arguement. Why is Mr Darboe hovering on the dirty and dishonest by insulting Mr Jatta in attempting to by-pass him as the official negotiator of the PDOIS to speak to Mr Sallah instead? Now that he is reminded about the official communication channels with PDOIS he is reeling about 'lack of respect' from Halifa Sallah for not speaking to him. Mr Darboe is therefore resorting to using this sorry excuse as a cheap platform to publicly villify Mr Sallah yet agaain. Has Mr Darboe forgotten to numerous correspondences from NADD and PDOIS, signed by Halifa Sallah as Coordinator and Secretary General respectively, to the UDP Secretariat and CCed to all the Gambian press and relevant parties that went unanswered? And they also want us to believe that what is mentioned in private between party leaders should not be brought into the public domain lest it creates further division among the opposition ranks. What could be more devisive than Mr Darboe's attempts of tell-tales of "insincerity" to the press yet again? Ofcourse, only when it suits the UDP's ambitions. Why is Mr Darboe personalising what should be a meeting between PDOIS and the UDP? Is Halifa Sallah PDOIS or is Ousainou Darboe UDP in his imagination?
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turk



USA
3356 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2010 :  19:58:42  Show Profile  Visit turk's Homepage Send turk a Private Message
For my limited observation reading posts here or news, I think Sallah has superior leadership, communication skills and political intelligence. And one significant advantage he has that he has a formula (ideology) to produce solutions. His youth is very significant advantage. And most important, see my signature. He is realistic.


diaspora! Too many Chiefs and Very Few Indians.

Halifa Salah: PDOIS is however realistic. It is fully aware that the Gambian voters are yet to reach a level of political consciousness that they rely on to vote on the basis of Principles, policies and programmes and practices.

Edited by - turk on 14 Sep 2010 20:00:09
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shaka



996 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2010 :  20:26:12  Show Profile Send shaka a Private Message
Exactly what is so confusing about a primary? Maybe your understanding of basic facts of the Gambian situation is the problem here. I will try to answer your questions below later. But first you have to understand that;

A. The constitution of the Gambia does not permit a second round of voting incase no party is able to wield the contested majority.

B. Any alliance/merger/union can only contest the presidential as a single party as is permitted by the constitution.

C. A primary is contesting for "the unbaked caked" if you like. Nobody can claim any entitlement except what is given to you by voting delegates. It is an even playing field. For example in the last Democratic Party primary, John Kerry could not demand any special treatment by virtue of the numbers he polled durring the previuous general elections against Bush nor could Hillary Clinton stand on the platform of being able to potentially bring in the might of her husbands supporters as leverage for any priviledged treatment.


Now allow me to answer your questions.


1. Who is eligible to vote in such a primary where there are no registered party voters?

Any delegate(unless otherwise stated) is eligible to vote. These delegates will drawn from an equal support base of all contesting candidates. Let us say 100 supporters from each contituency.


2. How will the primaries be conducted - each party send representatives or what?


See above.


3. Are voting open to even APRC supporters?

Absolutely not.



4. Who is allowed to contest such a primary base on partisan nomination or will independent candidates be allowed to contest on their own?

Any resident Gambian who can pull together a required number of delegates from all contituencies.


5. Which party plafform will the winning candidate contest under?

A political party independent of all the contesting parties.


6. What about voter education on how to go about these primaries where opposition parties are hardly allowed to conduct political rallies?

Where public space is denied for rallies the might of the emerging force should be able to durably contest such a position better than any single party. Besides there is always the private space available.

This is just my opinion and i hope it helps.
quote:
Originally posted by dbaldeh

Congratulation to Maafanta http://maafanta.com/ for such a revealing interview. At the very best if anything the interview reveals that the two opposition leaders have no solution to the stalemate that is going on in the Gambia.

I hear a lot of the same squables and absolutely no clear ideas or suggestion on how to get out of the deadlock.

I was baffled by Mr. Darboe's few attempts to speak to Halifa and or reach our to him in futility as a single mean of finding a solution to a very serious political deadlock on the ground in the Gambia...

With all fairness and respect, there ought to be other means to finding a head way for almost 5 years to this political discussion if the will and determination is there.

On the other hand, I was equally surprised by Halifa lamenting on a Non Partisan Primary without given basis on which these primaries will be conducted. It is one thing to wish to do something and quite another to convince interested parties that it is worth investing in.

Quite frankly, what is being advanced by Halifa on primaries as a solution to the single opposition party leader seems to be very flat and lacks substance. If you are calling for a primary election where it has never existed, and of all opposition political parties to select a single candidate, you ought to give a little more insight on how practical it is to conduct such a primary of voters. Some of the questions that could have been answered:

1. Who is eligible to vote in such a primary where there are no registered party voters?
2. How will the primaries be conducted - each party send representatives or what?
3. Are voting open to even APRC supporters?
4. Who is allowed to contest such a primary base on partisan nomination or will independent candidates be allowed to contest on their own?
5. Which party plafform will the winning candidate contest under?
6. What about voter education on how to go about these primaries where opposition parties are hardly allowed to conduct political rallies?

With all honesty and due respect to Halifa, I think there are more questions left unanswered with this primaries proposal in agenda 2011.

Finally, is Halifa telling us that without a 2-5 year transition rule, PDOIS will not support a coalition? What is more rigid than this position if in fact that is what he is insinuating?

Sadly, though the UDP does not seems to advance any agenda to form any kind of coalition. Yes, they all agreed a coalition is needed, but how would you have a coalition without the ideas on the table?

To be honest, what I get from this interview is a grim picture of the political dialogue in the Gambia. I am convince all the more that we need to let these brand of politicians live their useful life so we can start afresh. They have run out of ideas and have no solution on how to get to the next level... truly sad even though I love both leaders and have lot of respect for them...

What is your analysis of the interview???

http://maafanta.com/HalifaInterviewwithMaafanta.html

http://maafanta.com/OusainuDarboeInterviewwithMaafantaafterUDPCongress.html

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dbaldeh

USA
933 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  00:40:49  Show Profile  Visit dbaldeh's Homepage Send dbaldeh a Private Message
Shaka, thanks for attempting to answer the questions. In doing so you must realize yourself that there is a lot of work and ground rules that needs to be established before such a primary can take place.

For example:

1. Who is eligible to vote in such a primary where there are no registered party voters?

Any delegate(unless otherwise stated) is eligible to vote. These delegates will drawn from an equal support base of all contesting candidates. Let us say 100 supporters from each contituency.


Do you mean to tell us that Waa Juwara is allowed to pull APRC supporters to come and nominate him against Jammeh (do you see the huge risk in this blanket process?

3. Are voting open to even APRC supporters?

Absolutely not.

How do you know who supports APRC or not? There is no party registration. What will prevent the green boys from mobilizing people to vote in such a primary?

4. Who is allowed to contest such a primary base on partisan nomination or will independent candidates be allowed to contest on their own?

Any resident Gambian who can pull together a required number of delegates from all contituencies.


So is Fatoumata Jahumpa Ceesay allowed to mobilize people and contest the elections? Who determines who is to contest such? Don't you think the Democratic primaries you mentioned in the US has clear established rules?

5. Which party plafform will the winning candidate contest under?

A political party independent of all the contesting parties.


So NADD is in full play here right? or do you mean they are going to register another party?

Shaka, the common sense question I am asking again is first time is of the essence and it is not there. Second, if these people cannot sit down and discuss how could they establish the rules?

I must however agree with you that the discussion of what to do next should not and must not be limited to the leadership. Both parties can establish delegates independent of the top leadership to discuss the modalities and initial steps of what the frame work should look like.

My humble take again is that Halifa knows what is at stake in establishing all these rules and guidelines for a primary. It could have been done three years ago. It is practically impossible to conduct a free and fair primary from now against the elections.

Also Shaka, there was an agreement at least on paper in NADD that there would be equal representation in delegates.

In this situation that agreement is not there so to say that parties will send equal delegation regardless of size is somewhat questionable.

So I hope you can come back and educate us a little more on this primary thing because there are still more questions left unanswered...

Thanks







Baldeh,
"Be the change you want to see in the world" Ghandi
Visit http://www.gainako.com for your daily news and politics
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kayjatta



2959 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  07:55:03  Show Profile Send kayjatta a Private Message
DBaldeh, with all due respect, your questions are immaterial and inapplicable in the context. If you understand the political process, it will be obvious to you that Waa Juwara could not "pull APRC supporters to nominate him against Jammeh..." in such a primary and Fatoumata Jahumpa Ceesay would not be able to contest in such a primary. The Green Boys cannot equally mobilze people to vote in such a primary...
The primary is not a new concept in NADD. I am sure all the participants have thought about the primary process well. It should not be a complicated process like you make it appear.
As soon as the parties sit down at a table, I believe the ball should start rolling...
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toubab1020



8227 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  12:37:01  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
"As soon as the parties sit down at a table, I believe the ball should start rolling..."

We have a saying in England,"and pigs might fly"

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-pig1.htm

PLEASE NOTE:
This is no way disrespecting any person or religion,it is an English saying about situations,in other words,that day will never come,if it does it will be a miricle like pigs flying in the sky above,it will never happen.

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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kayjatta



2959 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  12:44:21  Show Profile Send kayjatta a Private Message

Exactly, Toubab! I doubt that day will ever come soon either. Not as long as UDP rules as the so-called "Biggest Opposition Party"...
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shaka



996 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  13:48:47  Show Profile Send shaka a Private Message
Baldeh you do understand that in attempting to answer your questions i have delivered them in their simplest form for better understanding. The problems herein in not my attempts to present a solution to a primary solution. It is the blind and sometimes prejudiced pessimism that you and like-minded persons try to throw in the works for those who are trying to chart a formula for a united opposition. Your attacks on Mr Sallah's and PDOIS's proposal as impossible, unfeasible, impractical, unreasonable is at times best silly or wanting to argue just for the sake of it, since most of the time you claim not to understand what they mean or you need further clarification. Who is more available for clarifications in Gambian politics than Halifa Sallah and the PDOIS? As a journalist you of all people should know better. Why don't you just send your concerns to PDOIS for further clarifications instead of attempting to stifle the public debate. The best ideas and solutions to any impasse anywhere, were bourned out of debates. Those who try to stifle debate are the most dangerous elements to any meaningful and best conceived formulas for change in the Gambia. I don't not open my mouth just out of blind deitification of anything that emanate from PDOIS or any other structure, be it political, dogmatic, creed or ideology but what is good for The Gambia not just in the short term but in the long run. If you are looking for a temporary fix to the Gambian problem then count me out of it.

Regarding the questions you have raised, let me point out that i am not a Mr-fix-it for the opposition. I am just contributing my part in the national debate. All concerned parties should come out and knock their heads together, draft relevant preambles and criteria for eligiblity, voting, logistic and finance among other things, for a primary. Guarding against all the notable concerns you have raised as well as others. This might require some intensive homework on the part of relevant parties but it is not impossible, impractical, unfeasible or unreasonable and time-consuming as you want us to believe.

One of the most important aspects of this primary is that it has the potential to unlock the mystery that is; why a young and dynamic group of potential politicians have not emerged from among the opposition ranks for so long. It will gives give the platform as well as usher in a requisite first-time experience for a young and new breed of future politicians. The future is bright if we all aspire to work towards this formula and do away with unnecessary pessimism.
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shaka



996 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  14:20:36  Show Profile Send shaka a Private Message
Also Shaka, there was an agreement at least on paper in NADD that there would be equal representation in delegates.

In this situation that agreement is not there so to say that parties will send equal delegation regardless of size is somewhat questionable.

So I hope you can come back and educate us a little more on this primary thing because there are still more questions left unanswered...(Baldeh)



C. A primary is contesting for "the unbaked caked" if you like. Nobody can claim any entitlement except what is given to you by voting delegates. It is an even playing field. For example in the last Democratic Party primary, John Kerry could not demand any special treatment by virtue of the numbers he polled durring the previuous general elections against Bush nor could Hillary Clinton stand on the platform of being able to potentially bring in the might of her husbands supporters as leverage for any priviledged treatment.
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sankalanka

255 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  19:51:18  Show Profile Send sankalanka a Private Message


Given the divergent interest and aspirational goals of the parties involved, how can one go about selecting an opposition candidate that can represent "the national interest", and the interest of all the opposition forces in the country for that matter?

Halifa made a very astute observation: that the reason why the opposition has failed in its various formations; UDP-NRP coalition and NADD could be either of three things. One, there was the absence of a viable coalition, and the people may not have liked the nature of the opposition coalitions. Second, the choices of candidates may not have been appealing to the people. The people may not have liked the candidates who represented the opposition in these elections. Third, the people may have had problems with the parties themselves, particularly how they were being viewed, and what they represented.

I will add a fourth, that there may have not been a substantive infrastructure that could make these coalitions or parties, if successful, any different from the 45 years of hegemonic rule in the Gambia.

This could be the reason or reasons why the opposition had been rejected by 542,055 voters who either voted for the incumbent or did not vote at all( Halifa's figures.)

What can be different this time around?

Well, if the problem is one of personality; that the voters do no like the current people who are presented to them as a choice to replace the incumbent, why not expand the field of personality choices? And how can one go about doing this?

Second, if the voters are having a problem with the parties that are involved in these elections; because of how they are viewed, and the interest right or wrong they are perceived to represent, why not make the 2011 elections as a referundum against the status quo.

Find a person, as Halifa is suggesting with his primary option. This person could be anybody. Let this person symbolize the opposition's unity and their collective rejection of the status quo.

Thirdly, if there is nothing substantive that can differentiate these parties or coalitions from the 45 years of hegemonic rule in the Gambia, then we need a new start.

The person who is identified as a symbol of the opposition's rejection of the status quo, and who will represent the opposition as a candidate in this election, could enter into an agreement with all the stakeholders, and if that person wins, can give the country a new start.

From my understanding of Halifa's position, lending weight to the currrent opposition structures does not render any help. After all, with all the coalitions formed it did not take away from the fact that 542,055 people did not vote for the opposition or stayed at home and did not vote at all. This is the worrisome part of the whole opposition debacle.

There is a central principle that is foremost in guiding Halifa's deliberations in all these political engagements. He said that he will not preside over the tyrany and poverty of the Gambian State, neither will he help anyone to preside over the tyrany and poverty of the Gambian state. For whatever Halifa is worth, I believe this principle is not going to be compromised. This lies at the core of what Halifa has sacrificed all these years. This also represents a constituency that has a strong and large following.

Rene

NB: I have expressed similar views in a 2009 contribution to the Gambiapost which I have forwarded here.

Rene

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dbaldeh

USA
933 Posts

Posted - 15 Sep 2010 :  22:17:16  Show Profile  Visit dbaldeh's Homepage Send dbaldeh a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by shaka

Baldeh you do understand that in attempting to answer your questions i have delivered them in their simplest form for better understanding. The problems herein in not my attempts to present a solution to a primary solution. It is the blind and sometimes prejudiced pessimism that you and like-minded persons try to throw in the works for those who are trying to chart a formula for a united opposition. Your attacks on Mr Sallah's and PDOIS's proposal as impossible, unfeasible, impractical, unreasonable is at times best silly or wanting to argue just for the sake of it, since most of the time you claim not to understand what they mean or you need further clarification. Who is more available for clarifications in Gambian politics than Halifa Sallah and the PDOIS? As a journalist you of all people should know better. Why don't you just send your concerns to PDOIS for further clarifications instead of attempting to stifle the public debate. The best ideas and solutions to any impasse anywhere, were bourned out of debates. Those who try to stifle debate are the most dangerous elements to any meaningful and best conceived formulas for change in the Gambia. I don't not open my mouth just out of blind deitification of anything that emanate from PDOIS or any other structure, be it political, dogmatic, creed or ideology but what is good for The Gambia not just in the short term but in the long run. If you are looking for a temporary fix to the Gambian problem then count me out of it.

Regarding the questions you have raised, let me point out that i am not a Mr-fix-it for the opposition. I am just contributing my part in the national debate. All concerned parties should come out and knock their heads together, draft relevant preambles and criteria for eligiblity, voting, logistic and finance among other things, for a primary. Guarding against all the notable concerns you have raised as well as others. This might require some intensive homework on the part of relevant parties but it is not impossible, impractical, unfeasible or unreasonable and time-consuming as you want us to believe.

One of the most important aspects of this primary is that it has the potential to unlock the mystery that is; why a young and dynamic group of potential politicians have not emerged from among the opposition ranks for so long. It will gives give the platform as well as usher in a requisite first-time experience for a young and new breed of future politicians. The future is bright if we all aspire to work towards this formula and do away with unnecessary pessimism.



Shaka, I did not attack Halifa and you know I have been on his side in the past. I however, think given the time constraints and lack of will on the side of the major player (at least as they demonstrate) it is quite in practical to conduct a successful primary with successful results.

They are not doing this for the exercise of it are they? No. They are doing it to give them a chance to win.

Shaka, like you I do not want to argue for the sake of it because everytime I put pen to paper my credibility is on the line. So I take these debates very seriously and learn from them as much as I can.

For your information, those of us in the media are more frustrated by these opposition leaders than any entity. We simply cannot get them to response to most of our demands. As Fatou said, it took her three months to get an interview with these people.

Guess what. Halifa owes me an interview for over a year and until today I did not get my responses. The media goes after these people like crazy and we cannot have audience with them the way we want. I think all that is what is affecting the opposition. They need the publicity but don't have the time!!!

Mai Fatty of GMC did the same until I went to Gambiapost and mention it there. As soon as I did a supporter forwarded my email and then we had that nice interview with him. Check the link below!

http://www.gainako.com/news/news/2010/07/05/exclusive-with-gmc-leader-mai-fatty-those-who-lack-ideas-or-can%E2%80%99t-compete-on-ideas-will-distract-by-hitting-below-the-belt.html

So we have tried in all directions to get these people to fight the way they should but to no avail.

I still think there are more questions left unanswered on the Primary issue.

Who will supervise these primaries? IEC??? Simple questions like that has not been answered.

Shaka, you also stated quote "If you are looking for a temporary fix to the Gambian problem then count me out of it".

This is precisely the fundamental problem with NADD. They wanted everything corrected at the same times without factoring the politics involved.

Would you not rather see incremental steps of improving our democracy and good governance than helping perpetuate the same Jammeh regime? Shaka, Gambia's democratic and governing problems cannot be solved with one election cycle or change of leadership. It is going to take time and resilence for effective change to occur in the Gambia.

So I would rather have a civilian elected government (not the once who took off their uniforms for convenience) who would respect the constitution and freedom of speech of citizens and work slowly to improve peoples' lives than try to do it all and change it all without success.

That is what Halifa and others fail to recognize the last time around. Change does take some time but we have to have the right people in the position of policy influence before long term change can happen.

If you want it all you lose it all period. Incremental change makes more sense and is more practical in our situation.

African leaders have a history of perpetuating themselves in power anyway. So it really doesn't matter whether we have a five year transition or ten year transition... we need to get on the transition phase and that is what we need to dwell on here to get these people to understand it.


Baldeh,
"Be the change you want to see in the world" Ghandi
Visit http://www.gainako.com for your daily news and politics
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shaka



996 Posts

Posted - 16 Sep 2010 :  11:08:08  Show Profile Send shaka a Private Message
There is a central principle that is foremost in guiding Halifa's deliberations in all these political engagements. He said that he will not preside over the tyrany and poverty of the Gambian State, neither will he help anyone to preside over the tyrany and poverty of the Gambian state. For whatever Halifa is worth, I believe this principle is not going to be compromised. This lies at the core of what Halifa has sacrificed all these years. This also represents a constituency that has a strong and large following. (Rene )

Beautifully put Rene. You have honestly define the man and what he stand for. Count me among the constituency represented by this principle. If humankind everywhere strive towards this endeavour the world will be a better place. Thanks you very much.

Baldeh allow me time to get back to you. I am a bit tied up at the moment.
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Senegambia

175 Posts

Posted - 16 Sep 2010 :  12:56:52  Show Profile Send Senegambia a Private Message
I am quite tempted to call you an amateur in the field of communication but I will skip it. I guess it's just your temper, Shaka, your temper! It discredits every point you want to put across in the eyes of those who are not die-hard ideologists.

I share the thoughts of so many that a primary is not what the opposition need to go through right now. It is possible, yes, BUT is Agenda 2011 which I don't like to criticize aware of all the risks involve in an inter opposition-party primary? I don't think so! You don't just embark on things just because you think they are possible. The risk must be seen to be As Low As Reasonably Practicable. Ask any risk analyst/manager and I am sure he/she will break it down for you to get me... I don't like wasting my time discussing the constitutionality of a merger or something because I believe there are experts on the ground, including party leaders, who can deal with such legalities appropriately.

Apologize late reply and just to let you know you keep ending up asking more questions than commenting.. About 8 questions in two paragraphs all for me.... Makes me wonder....


quote:
Originally posted by shaka

quote:
Originally posted by Senegambia











Tesito


Edited by - Senegambia on 16 Sep 2010 12:59:21
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