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 The Drumbeats Of Afdie
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sankalanka

270 Posts

Posted - 02 Jan 2014 :  19:41:06  Show Profile Send sankalanka a Private Message
The drumbeats of Afdie
the potent beat of the drums reverberates
the virtues of the folklore in Banjul extol
the grandeur of the circumcision rites
the harmonious songs of the Sambasoho it prides.


The drumbeats of Afdie
the celebration of the rich Chosan in Banjul
the beautiful lyrics of the Kassak
the kankurang, the fanal and the Hunting
the cohesive spirit, joy and laughter of the city
it doesn't matter what your faith or creed
at the pencha we dance without malice or greed.


Momodou



Denmark
8491 Posts

Posted - 02 Jan 2014 :  20:36:56  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message
Thanks! This times are real festive in greater Banjul. Both Muslim and Christian youth engage in fanal making.

Happy new year to you.

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone
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sankalanka

270 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  00:18:25  Show Profile Send sankalanka a Private Message
Thanks Momodou. I saw the pictures of the Hunting and other cultural festivities at this time of the year in Banjul on facebook, and it brought back my memories of Christmas and New Year celebrations in the city in times past.

I understand these occasions have lost their luster and appeal, and are no longer what it used to be, but it is gratifying that some aspects of it still remains.

Christmas and New Year celebrations used to be a Banjul phenomenon and the whole city basked in the cultural experience and merriment, with an indistinguishable line between who is who and what is what. The same can also be said of other religious and festive occasions.

The celebration of the diversity and acceptance of all the cultural and social experiences in the city was just phenomenal and exemplary.

I wish you and your family a happy and a prosperous New Year.
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Dalton1



3485 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  04:08:04  Show Profile  Visit Dalton1's Homepage Send Dalton1 a Private Message


Rene –



I like the poem as you shared, “The Drum Beats of Afdie” on its cultural importance. The poem might have taken title from the known and shortened Aku version of Half-Die (Afdie) in Banjul. The narration about the cholera outbreak that claimed many lives gave it a name. That is not even the poem’s teaching as you shared. It looks at a culture of acceptance where cultural entertainment defined the spirit of residents, consequently making the community glued together in unity and harmony. For others who left home for the outside world, such reflections resembling your poem are common. If for anything, it is certainly healthy, though one would wish for such nice days to come back. It might not. If I were to put the “…drum beats of afdie…” in my own words, I see myself running after cows and calves in rhythm order. I see torrential rains and tall grasses while the cows graze beautifully in rich meadows. The poem is certainly a nice cultural touch…and these are some of the events that bonded our communities for a while. I have taken the liberty to myself to submit your poem for wider publication.



Thanks for sharing & best for 2014!



Yero

"There is no god but Allah (SWT); and Muhammad (SAW)is His last messenger." shahadah. Fear & Worship Allah (SWT) Alone! (:
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kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  05:05:42  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
1. Short but encapsulate vivid youthful memories of local environment of "waa Banjul" old city life, an era of history, culture and traditions.

2. Useful information on from accessgambia.com listed;

3. Lemzo entertains with one of best "Simb" video because we share with our neighbours (within Manding Empire); especially Senegal same history, culture & traditions

4. Sankalanka hope you will try to remember "marche musanteh", great "Sabarr", "Ndow rabbin", Super Eagles band (aka Ifangbondi), Gelewaar and then era of our rare outstanding Gambia African Ballet (inspired by Guinea Ballets Africain) artists and your next part (if planned) will bring back more sweet memories

Edited by - kobo on 03 Jan 2014 05:34:26
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Momodou



Denmark
8491 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  07:56:40  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message
Rene, I heard someone saying that any Banjulian who does not have both Christian and Muslim relatives is a new comer. This reflects the religious harmony and tolerance that exists.

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone
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Dalton1



3485 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  14:26:45  Show Profile  Visit Dalton1's Homepage Send Dalton1 a Private Message
Corrections for readers:

The disease outbreak is Malaria and not cholera.

Thanks.

Yero

"There is no god but Allah (SWT); and Muhammad (SAW)is His last messenger." shahadah. Fear & Worship Allah (SWT) Alone! (:
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sankalanka

270 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  17:39:05  Show Profile Send sankalanka a Private Message
Dalton1 thanks for the commentary.

Kobo you are a gem giving relevance and context to our conversations by researching and bringing forth all these valuable information that increased our knowledge and understanding. I learnt something new about the history of the Fanal and Kankurang.

I also remember "marche musanteh". We used to walk the "tatipere" from "whafi njaago" to "ganaw marche". I also remember the great "sabarr's" especially the ones at the junction of Dobson street and Anglesea just opposite "Tahi" Sir Alhagie Alieu Jeng. He was knighted. I also remember the great Sabarr drummers the twins, Ousaniou and Assan and their legendary father, I believe his name was Alhagi Batch, who appeared on the scene only on very, very big festivals and it was something to behold. The family compound is the first one at the junction of Dobson and Anglesea towards Denton street.

I also remember the beginnings of the Super Eagles and used to loiter around their practice sessions at Buckle street. I remember sneaking into the dance hall in the building at the junction of Buckle street and Hill Street; Mbaye Njie and Sons used to occupy the big shop underneath. I also remember "Kankujarey" behind "marche bu ndow" at Lasso Wharf street, and I believe the band 'Magadan" used to practice there with the singer the late Chexs of Hill street, brother to Pa Jabel Sosseh. I liked their song "Kerr Ma Numbey". May be I am saying it wrong, but you may know the song. Chexs was the lead singer for this song. Kobo Banjul was an exciting place with lots and lots of fun and entertainment. These were the glory days.

Momodou, it is indeed true that any Bajulian who doesn't have a Muslim or Christian relative was a new comer. This is how inter-related the society was and reflected the religious harmony and tolerance that existed.

I was born and brought up in a Muslim and Wollof environment as well as all my siblings. The family that was close to our upbringing was Serahule. But they were in a sense typically Wollof. Ethnic identity was close to zero and was only identifiable by the language spoken. And I would argue that most people from Banjul have no sense of ethnic loyalty apart from the fact that they were born into one. And this can be true also in most places in the Gambia. Discussions about tribalism and ethnic loyalty is an academic construct and is used by elites and educated people to fight their wars of partisan politics and their diverse interest groupings.
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Momodou



Denmark
8491 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2014 :  18:28:07  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message
I have my copy of the book as stated to you in the earlier topic now in the archives: The Drumbeats of Afdie

Click on the photo here to get your own copy

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone
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