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 WHO IS DR. O?
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tiramakhan



25 Posts

Posted - 16 Jun 2013 :  17:49:37  Show Profile Send tiramakhan a Private Message

@ Kobo:

"Which is what? "musician" or artist?"
The ???? simply because there's no known record over the past 50 years of Dr.O ever displaying any musical skills - even his theoretical knowledge of music can't be qualified as even remotely adequate.
Being a music enthusiast doesn't necessarily imply one has qualifications as a musician/artist. Just imagine millions of soccer fans demanding to be selected for playing in the Champions League.

"work with many Gambian musicians": many = three: Abdel Kabirr, Pa Touray (†19 March 2003), Jaliba Kuyateh - apart from the incidental recruitment of some Gambian musicians as session players for the 5 performances of Pa Touray Dr. O staged over a period of 7 years.
Perhaps one should interview these musicians themselves - or in the case of Pa Touray his family - for the inside story on their collaboration with Dr. O. and the impact it has had on their careers.

As to the "the wondrous SOTO KOTO WORLD": not meant to be demeaning, just that there doesn't seem to be any substantial connection or even functional web link with either music or business outside the Soto Koto website. Perfectly happy to replace "wondrous" by "wonderfully virtual" to avoid hurting anyone's feelings.

The ???? after politician: likewise there are no known records of Dr.O's political career until 1981 - possibly all deliberately destroyed by the then regime which battalion leader Dr.O put his life up for to overturn. Certainly political pundits and/or political party archives should be able to shed light on this as yet hidden aspect of Dr.O's diverse career.

The world is divided into people who do things, and people who get the credit. Try to belong to the first class - there's far less competition (D. Morrow)

Edited by - tiramakhan on 16 Jun 2013 17:51:40
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tiramakhan



25 Posts

Posted - 27 Oct 2013 :  01:38:20  Show Profile Send tiramakhan a Private Message
Dr. O - Gambia's plagiarist extraordinaire - revealing the art of creating a LEGEND


Dr. O - expert in matters of copyright, not least as board member of The Gambia's Copyright Office and as Director of the West African Copyright Society - is known as the author of the music LEGENDS series, published by the Daily Observer.
He has developed a unique writing method - the Dr. Cuckoo Formula of CtrlC+CtrlV - used also at the Manding Morry Academy for Music curriculum "Copyright & Copywrong - Appropriating copyright of works created by someone else in 3 easy steps":


"Copyright & Copywrong - Appropriating copyright of works created by someone else in 3 easy steps"

Step 1. Choose a local personality as a subject for your story. Make sure to pick someone who is not in a position to contest your writings.
Let's say the late PA LAMIN DRAMMEH, manager of Ifang Bondi/Super Eagles.

Step 2. Rip a related topic from the internet such as Wikipedia - for instance PETER GRANT, manager of Yardbirds /Led Zeppelin

Step 3. Copy the Wikipedia article and simply replace all names/places by local names/places/circumstances relating to your chosen subject, and presto! you have launched yourself as a true author.

Get your bogus article published in an established newspaper - reputed for objectivity and well-researched content - and make sure your writing gets a global online distribution to enhance your reputation as an internationally authority on music."



Dr. O's story "LEGENDS: -Pa Lamin Drammeh-Daii Maga Promotions" (Daily Observer, 25 October) offers a case study of the use of the Dr. Cuckoo Formula of CtrlC+CtrlV.
Each plagiarized sentence is followed by the corresponding original root text "Peter Grant (music manager)"(Wikipedia), printed in blue.


LEGENDS:- PA LAMIN DRAMMEH-DAII MAGA PROMOTIONS

Gambia,s top artist manager


Groundbreaking in his style of management,  Pa (Grant) had changed the dynamic that existed between bands, managers and promoters. He was a superb, canny manager.

Pa Lamin Drammeh was born in Banjul. To many, he was known as Pop-sa and also called Rap Brown because of his high speed of talking imitating the Black Panther leader in America of (Student Non Violence Coordinating Committee). Pa Lamin got his skills in human management as a well traveled and experienced man living in many cities like in Abijan and Accra. 

Pa Lamin was soon attracted to the entertainment industry, and worked as a stagehand for the Eagles until 1965, when he was called up for  service in the Super Eagles, reaching the rank of Production Manager. He worked briefly as an entertainment manager of Super Eagles in Banjul before being employed as a manager of Ifangbondi, the New Band name for some of the members who decided to transform the band into an ALL African music group and authentic culture and music.
Grant was soon attracted to the entertainment industry, and worked as a stagehand for the Croydon Empire Theatre until 1953, when he was called up for national service in the RAOC, reaching the rank of corporal. He worked briefly as an entertainment manager at a hotel in Jersey before being employed as a bouncer and doorman at London's famous The 2i's Coffee Bar, where Cliff Richard, Adam Faith, Tommy Steele and others got their start.

By 1974, Pa Lamin had started to manage his own concerts including the Stadium Demba Diop in Dakar & Stadium Iba Mar Diop & the Daniel Sorano in Dakar, Senegal. His management was established at Kombo Street in Banjul and later at Hope Street in Banjul with Ndee Sarr Mboge (Wife of Ousman Mboge as secretary of the  office for managing events and the operation of the Ifangbondi events. 
By 1964, Grant had started to manage his own acts including the Nashville Teens, an all-girl group called She Trinity, the New Vaudeville Band, Jeff Beck, Terry Reid and Stone the Crows. His management was established in the same 155 Oxford Street office used by his friend, record producer Mickie Most, who had previously worked with Grant at the 2i's club.

Pa Lamin set up the highly successful DAII MAGA PARTNERS, which produced a string of hits throughout the 1970s. A highly discipline management structure which made Ifangbondi a successful story and broadly known because of their management abilities.
Most and Grant together set up the highly successful RAK Records label, which produced a string of hits throughout the 1970s.

In late 1970 the band asked Pa Lamin to take over management of the Young Ifangbondi who were constantly touring and play bet during intervals and opening.
In late 1966 Simon Napier-Bell asked Grant to take over management of the Yardbirds, who were constantly touring [..]

“When I started managing the Ifang Bondi, they weren't getting the Radio Airplays, but were on the village circuit and underground scene in Senegal. Instead of trying to get played on top radio, I realized that there was another market,” Pa Lamin Said. 
As he (Grant) explained: When I started managing the Yardbirds, they weren't getting the hit singles, but were on the college circuit and underground scene in America. Instead of trying to get played on Top 40 radio, I realised that there was another market.

Pa Lamn and his persuasive presence were influential in the Ifangbondi making money from concerts for the first time. Pa Lamin travelled closely with the Ifangbondi, ensuring that all costs were kept to a minimum, that members were paid on time and that the band retained artistic control. Unlike most other managers who rarely set foot in a music venue, grant's approach was hands-on.
Grant's no-nonsense approach to promoters, and his persuasive presence, were influential in the Yardbirds making money from concerts for the first time. Grant travelled closely with the Yardbirds, ensuring that all costs were kept to a minimum, that members were paid on time, and that the band retained artistic control. Unlike most other managers at the time who rarely set foot in a music venue, Grant's approach was hands-on.

He negotiated the group's sizeable two-year record contract with Griot Records in Senegal, and his business philosophy would eventually pay off for the label. Pa Lamin strongly believed that band could make more money, and have more artistic merit, by focusing their efforts on albums rather than singles which the Super Eagles released in Ghana carrying song like PARADISE ON EARTH, and others. Pa believes that live performances were deemed more important than television appearances [Oops, no television yet in Senegal and Gambia] and radio.
He negotiated the group's sizeable five-year record contract with Atlantic Records, and his business philosophy would eventually pay off for the label. Grant strongly believed that bands could make more money, and have more artistic merit, by focusing their efforts on albums rather than singles. Live performances were deemed more important than television appearances [..]

When Super Eagles dissolved, with all band members departed except guitarist Badou Jobe, Vocalist Paps Touray, Saxophone player Ali Harb and Keyboardist Senemie Taylor who promptly set about constructing a new group consisting of himself, Karamo Sabally, Samson Gassama, Pa Alieu Njie, Pa Njie Bass (Musa). Originally dubbed the "New Super Eagles" the group chose the name Ifangbondi, with Pa Lamin assuming the role of their managing director. His trust and loyalty to Ifangbondi was such that his managerial arrangement with the band was via a gentlemen's agreement.
In 1968 the Yardbirds dissolved, with all band members departing except guitarist Jimmy Page, who promptly set about constructing a new group consisting of himself, Robert Plant, John Bonham and John Paul Jones. Originally dubbed the "New Yardbirds" the group chose the name Led Zeppelin, with Grant assuming the role of their manager. His trust and loyalty to Led Zeppelin was such that his managerial arrangement with the band was via a gentlemen's agreement.

It is doubtful whether Ifangbondi would have been as successful without Pa Lamin as their business manager. He negotiated the group's engagement contracts with and his business philosophy would eventually pay off.
It is doubtful whether Led Zeppelin would have been as successful without Grant as their manager. He negotiated the group's sizeable five-year record contract with Atlantic Records, and his business philosophy would eventually pay off for the label.

Ifangbondi's particular success in the Senegal can partly be credited to Pa Lamin's keen sense of Senegalese audiences and the vast music movement that was sweeping that country. It was his sound knowledge of the Senegal touring scene that thrust Ifangbondi into the forefront of the burgeoning Senegambian market, and under his stewardship the great majority of Ifangbondi concerts were performed in Senegal, resulting in massive profits for the group. 
Led Zeppelin's particular success in the United States can partly be credited to Grant's keen sense of US audiences and the vast underground movement that was sweeping the country. It was his sound knowledge of the American touring scene that thrust Led Zeppelin into the forefront of the burgeoning American rock market, and under his stewardship the great majority of Led Zeppelin concerts were performed in the United States, resulting in massive profits for the group.

He ensured that the vast bulk of ticket profits wound up in the hands of the band rather than in the hands of promoters and booking agents and is reported to have secured 90% of gate money from concerts performed by the band, an unprecedented feat. By taking this approach he set a new standard for artist management, "single-handedly pioneering the shift of power from the agents and promoters to the artists and management themselves.
He ensured that the vast bulk of ticket profits wound up in the hands of the band rather than in the hands of promoters and booking agents., and is reported to have secured 90% of gate money from concerts performed by the band, an unprecedented feat. By taking this approach he set a new standard for artist management, "single-handedly pioneer[ing] the shift of power from the agents and promoters to the artists and management themselves."

Pa Lamin’s determination to protect the financial interests of Ifangbondi was also reflected by the sometimes-extraordinary measures he took to combat the practice of unauthorized live bootleg recordings. He is reported to have personally visited record stores in Banjul and Dakar that were selling Ifangbondi bootlegs and demanded all copies be handed over. He also monitored the crowd at Ifangbondi’s concerts in order to locate anything, which resembled bootleg recording equipment. 
At one concert in Faranenni in 1978 he saw what he thought was such equipment on the floor of the venue and ensured by that it was destroyed arrested a prosperity of JALTRON RECORD SHOP.
Grant's determination to protect the financial interests of Led Zeppelin was also reflected by the sometimes-extraordinary measures he took to combat the practice of unauthorized live bootleg recordings. He is reported to have personally visited record stores in London that were selling Led Zeppelin bootlegs and demanded all copies be handed over. He also monitored the crowd at Led Zeppelin concerts in order to locate anything which resembled bootleg recording equipment.
At one concert at Vancouver in 1971 he saw what he thought was such equipment on the floor of the venue and ensured that it was destroyed.


Grant [Oops, Pa Lamin] is also recognised for the complete and unwavering faith that he placed in Led Zeppelin [Oops, Ifang Bondi]. Unlike some other managers of the era, he never compromised his clients by exploiting them for short-term profit, instead always putting their interests first. This was demonstrated by his decision to never release the popular songs from Led Zeppelin's [Oops, Ifang Bondi's] albums as singles in the UK, out of respect for the band's desire to develop the concept of album-oriented rock [Oops, Afro Manding sound].
Grant is also recognised for the complete and unwavering faith that he placed in Led Zeppelin. Unlike some other managers of the era, he never compromised his clients by exploiting them for short-term profit, instead always putting their interests first. This was demonstrated by his decision to never release the popular songs from Led Zeppelin's albums as singles in the UK, out of respect for the band's desire to develop the concept of album-oriented rock.

Ifangbondi technicians, Omar Khan John and Dembo Gibba, Sol Jagne and Dolleh Ebou Sanneh  trusted to get the music together and then just kept everybody else away, making sure we [Oops, the band) had the space to do whatever we [Oops, they] wanted without interference from anybody - press, record company, promoters. He only had his clients and reckoned that if he were to go to do good, then he would do good. He always believed that we [Oops, they] would be hugely successful.
As was explained by Jones:
[Peter] trusted us to get the music together, and then just kept everybody else away, making sure we had the space to do whatever we wanted without interference from anybody - press, record company, promoters. He only had us [as clients] and reckoned that if we were going to do good, then he would do good. He always believed that we would be hugely successful.
 

Pa Lamin's past experience in handling stars such as Pa Touray and Badou Jobe also provided him with an excellent grounding in managing the pandemonium, which frequently surrounded Ifangbondi, particularly whilst the band was on tour. Pa Lamin himself said, "Ifangbondi looks after the music and I do everything else - and if it takes some strong measures to get our way, then so be it".
Grant's past experience in handling stars such as Jerry Lee Lewis and Gene Vincent also provided him with an excellent grounding in managing the pandemonium which frequently surrounded Led Zeppelin, particularly whilst the band was on tour. Grant himself said that "Led Zeppelin looks after the music and I do everything else - and if it takes some strong measures to get our way, then so be it."

Dodou Sabally (Simon), former sound technician and engineer, was, in many respects, the physical embodiment of Super Eagles and he was Pa Lamin working partner. Standing over six feet and weighing over 250 pounds, he used his intimidating presence to maintain order and to keep his charges safe and worry-free ... His raison d’etre was simple - protecting his band music and their equipment. 
Peter Grant, former bouncer and wrestler, was, in many respects, the physical embodiment of a Led Zeppelin. Standing over six feet and weighing over 300 pounds, he used his intimidating presence to maintain order and to keep his charges safe and worry-free ... His raison d’etre was simple - protecting his band and their finances.

However, although there were reports of his heavy-handed, intimidating tactics, Pa Lamin's friends suggest "he was generally held in high esteem by those with whom he came in contact”. In the words of Senemie Taylor, "Pa was a very sensitive man. He was a very, very smart man. People just think of his reputation. He could out-talk anybody...”
However, although there were media reports of his heavy-handed, intimidating tactics, Grant's biographers Lewis and Pallet suggest that "he was generally held in high esteem by those with whom he came in contact."
In the words of John Paul Jones, "Peter was a very sensitive man. He was a very, very smart man. People just think of his size and his reputation, but actually he never had to use his size. He could out-talk anybody ..."


Pa Lamin was instrumental in setting up Ifangbondi’s Business Company, Daii Maga Music office in 1978. He was also the driving force in establishing The Afro Manding Sounds in 1974, which gave Ifangbondi further financial and artistic control over its products. Although initially he solely managed Ifangbondi, in later years he additionally assumed management of other bands like Oussou Njie’s Fateleku, When he was once questioned on what was the single most important thing a manager could say, Grant's [Oops, Pa Lamin)response was "Know when to say 'no'.
Grant was instrumental in setting up Led Zeppelin's publishing company, Superhype Music in 1968. He was also the driving force in establishing Swan Song Records in 1974, which gave Led Zeppelin further financial and artistic control over its products. Although initially he solely managed Led Zeppelin, in later years he additionally assumed management of other bands signed to Swan Song, such as Stone the Crows, Bad Company and Maggie Bell. […] . When he was once questioned on what was the single most important thing a manager could say, Grant's response was "Know when to say 'no'."

Pa Lamin Drammeh has been widely recognised for improving pay and conditions for musicians in dealings with concert promoters. According to band members, "Pa Lamin enjoys a proud position in the pantheon of legendary African band managers. "Without his efforts, musicians had no careers. He was the first to make sure the artists came first and that we got paid and paid properly".
Grant has been widely recognised for improving pay and conditions for musicians in dealings with concert promoters. According to Mat Snow, "Peter Grant enjoys a proud position in the pantheon of legendary British rock managers." […]
Phil Everly, from the Everly Brothers, noted that "[w]ithout his efforts, musicians had no careers. He was the first to make sure the artists came first and that we got paid and paid properly."


We owe so much to that man. He changed the balance for musicians ... His vision was amazing. His dedication was with Super Eagles and Ifang Bondi Bands, and between them they had a very powerful tool.
Chris Dreja, whom Grant had managed whilst he was with the Yardbirds, recalls:
We owe so much to that man. He changed the balance for musicians ... His vision was amazing. His dedication was with Led Zeppelin, and between them they had a very powerful tool.


Similarly, Seneme has described Pa Lamin as groundbreaking in his style of management, explaining, "Pa had changed the dynamic that existed between bands, managers and promoters. He was a superb, canny manager.
Similarly, Page has described Grant as groundbreaking in his style of management, explaining that "Peter had changed the dynamic that existed between bands, managers and promoters. He was a superb, canny manager."

Author: Oko Drammeh



Source for the full stories:

Daily Observer on Pa Lamin Drammeh http://observer.gm/africa/gambia/article/legends-pa-lamin-drammeh-daii-maga-promotions

Wikipedia on Peter Grant (music manager) (1935-1995) English music manager http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Grant_ music_manager



The world is divided into people who do things, and people who get the credit. Try to belong to the first class - there's far less competition (D. Morrow)

Edited by - tiramakhan on 27 Oct 2013 03:06:00
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kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 27 Oct 2013 :  07:25:53  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by tiramakhan


"A veteran revolutionary militant in his own right..."

"Of course! I was part of the people who were arrested in the 1981 coup and charged with treason. I was kept in various detention cells. And so many people died in those cells, but I survived. I was beaten with machine guns and batons..."

@ Kobo:

The ???? after politician: likewise there are no known records of Dr.O's political career until 1981 - possibly all deliberately destroyed by the then regime which battalion leader Dr.O put his life up for to overturn. Certainly political pundits and/or political party archives should be able to shed light on this as yet hidden aspect of Dr.O's diverse career.



1. 1981 Coup When loyal forces under command of then Inspector General of Police Mboob, Deputy Inspector General Mass Jarra and fearful Commander Tambajang fortified Banjul Police Station Oko Drammeh aka DR O was caught and detained in the cells there; which was overcrowded and tragically many could not make it to survive. Koro Sallah's brother Real De Banjul soccer club star (left winger both soccer club & national squad) late Nyanga Sallah who came on family holidays and the coup just happened was detained there and died of suffocation; including Banjul city celebrity DJ/Radio Gambia News Presenter Late Femi Jeng amongst others. This was the time when late popular businessman who owned the petrol station opposite former Banjul/Serrekunda garage Independence Drive at time of incident, SUPER EAGLES/IFANGBONDI GRAND PATRON & RESPECTED GAMBIAN ELDER Alieu Kah WAS GUNNED DOWN IN BANJUL AND FALLEN! MAY THEIR SOULS RIP. AMEEN!

COURTESY OF GAMBIA-L LINK HERE WITH FACTS SHARED FOR THIS QUOTE POSTED BY A FORUM MEMBER : "I do not think Kukoi used late Femi Jeng and this is the first time I am hearing this. All I know is that late Femi, Oko Drameh, late Nyanga Sallah and others were locked up in a crowded cell. Femi, Nyanga and others lost their life due to suffication. Oko survived the ordeal."

Tragically that's all Dr.O will be remembered in 1981 coup and on political history of The Gambia; and not as a "battalion leader"

2. YOU VERY CLEARLY CAUGHT DR O IN THE ACT AND EXPOSED HIM ON PLAGIARISM, WITH VERY SERIOUS REPERCUSSIONS AGAINST HIS INTEGRITY.

I FEEL SORRY FOR MY GOOD ELDER BROTHER AND COMPATRIOT

3.SUPER EAGLES 60S SONGS IN TRIBUTE TO LATE ALIEU KAH (REFERRED UNDER POINT 1.), PAP TOURAY & MALANG GASSAMA AND MANY DEPARTED SOULS! RIP




Edited by - kobo on 27 Oct 2013 12:47:29
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