Bantaba in Cyberspace
Bantaba in Cyberspace
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Invite a friend
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Education Forum
 History
 Origin of The Gambia National Anthem
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
| More
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

Momodou



Denmark
8491 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2012 :  13:10:24  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message
Ex-British administrator discloses origin of The Gambia National Anthem

Monday, February 27, 2012

One Jeremy Howe in the United Kingdom who has served as an administrative officer in the country from 1954-1965, has sent a correspondent to the Gambian leader, His Excellency, Sheikh Professor Alhaji Dr Yahya Jammeh, disclosing the origin of The Gambia’s National Anthem.


Howe, who was appointed to chair the committee that was set up by government to judge the submissions received for the anthem and make recommendation to the Cabinet said his wife Virginia Julia Howe wrote the words of the present anthem.

The correspondent reads:
I have recently been reading on the internet about the Gambia where I am proud to have served as an administrative officer from 1954-1965. It seems that there continues to be some argument about the origins of the Gambian National Anthem and I though that it would be helpful if I were to summarise what actually happened and put the record straight.

At the time of Internal Self Government I was attached to the Ministry of Local Government in the capital, then known as Bathurst. The government decided to invite submissions for a new anthem from members of the public and offered a prize for the successful submission. A committee was set up to judge the submissions received and make recommendation to the Cabinet. I was appointed to chair that committee. In the event the cabinet rejected all the submissions received as being unsuitable and they invited me to submit a composition myself including words and music.

The words of the present anthem which the cabinet accepted were written by my wife, Virginia Julia Howe, and I adapted and harmonized a traditional Mandinka song, Foday Kaba Dumbuya to fit those words. I chose that particular song after listening to some recordings of various traditional songs. The anthem is, therefore, entirely the result of my wife’s and my contributions.

About two years ago, after noting that there appeared to be some argument about the origins of the national anthem, I wrote to the Gambia High Commission in London and sent them copies of some of the original correspondence still in my possession such as my appointment as chairman of the selection committee and a letter confirming that I had been awarded a prize of £50, a prize which enable me to buy the desk on which I am now writing this letter.

My wife and I would be very grateful if the official records relating to the anthem could be corrected and the various website updated. May I also point out that my wife’s second name is Julia and not Julie, and that my second name, Frederic has no k. I should be glad to hear from you that my letter has been received and appropriate action taken. If I can be of any further assistance please do not hesitate to let me known.
With kind regards and best wishes
Your sincerely
Jeremy Howe


Source: Daily Observer

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2012 :  14:41:56  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Well done Jeremy Howe,this toubab must now be quite elderly and maybe getting his life in order,I think its great to have someone who knew Gambia in the days before independence who obviously loved the country then and I am sure gave great service to Gambia,to take the trouble to do what he did I think is great,and still a matter of pride to him.
I have also heard stories about another toubab who I think was called Mr. Foster who ran Mile two in the "old days".
Many years later when I first visited The Gambia there was a statue to him(now gone) outside the main gate of the prison this man was also well liked by Gambians in "the old days".
The times I mention above also form a part of Gambian History and shouldn't be forgotten in the rush to development and progress,in England we do like tradition and history and take care of records and things from the past including buildings something that Gambia has not really thought about, I am referring to the few traditional wattle and daub houses, (wattle and daub, a form of wall construction consisting of interwoven twigs plastered with a mixture of clay, lime, water, and sometimes dung and chopped straw) that still exist in Banjul,personally I should like to see them saved before they have gone too far in disrepair.

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
Go to Top of Page

Momodou



Denmark
8491 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2012 :  15:06:35  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message
He definitely deserves to be commended and remembered in our history. He gave us something that every Gambian is proud of.

I agree with you about the preservation of certain historic buildings. I doubt how much the National Archives have preserved both digital and hard copies of stuff from Radio Gambia.


THE GAMBIA NATIONAL ANTHEM

For the Gambia, our homeland we
strive and work and pray,
That all may live in unity,
Freedom and peace each day,


Let justice guide our actions towards
the common good,
And join our diverse peoples to prove
man's brotherhood.


We pledge our firm allegiance,
Our promises we renew,
Keep us great God of nations,
to The Gambia ever true
.

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone
Go to Top of Page

Janko

Gambia
1267 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2012 :  19:36:47  Show Profile  Visit Janko's Homepage Send Janko a Private Message
No wonder we have phrases like.

And join our diverse peoples to prove
man's brotherhood.

Clean your house before pointing a finger ... Never be moved by delirious Well-wishers in their ecstasy

Edited by - Janko on 27 Feb 2012 19:40:06
Go to Top of Page

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2012 :  22:16:57  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Janko,do I take it your post shows you are unhappy with the phrase "And join our diverse peoples to prove man's brotherhood." if so can you explain why ?

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
Go to Top of Page

Senegambia

175 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  00:29:59  Show Profile Send Senegambia a Private Message
I read the reaction of Gambia's very own Dida Halake on maafanta saying we must get a new anthem. I disagree with Mr Halake and agree with Momodou and Toubab. This guy has given us all something to be proud of. The national anthem has got and preached it all: justice, freedom, development and peace. Only if we live it!

Tesito

Go to Top of Page

kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  06:20:41  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
JOLLOF NEWS;
Go to Top of Page

Janko

Gambia
1267 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  10:21:06  Show Profile  Visit Janko's Homepage Send Janko a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by toubab1020

Janko,do I take it your post shows you are unhappy with the phrase "And join our diverse peoples to prove man's brotherhood." if so can you explain why ?



I had a discussion about the content of the national anthem with Kobo and others where we took up the question. I can´t find it.
KOBO, -please help us.

Clean your house before pointing a finger ... Never be moved by delirious Well-wishers in their ecstasy
Go to Top of Page

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  12:11:21  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Janko,these words appear in the second verse of the toubab words of the national anthem for the Gambia,and demonstrate the feeling the world is a brotherhood where we should all live peacefully together,in your posting you appear to cast scorn on that phrase,I just wondered why,nothing more sinister than that,if you agree with my interpretation of those words then why your comment? if you do not agree with my interpretation,what do you think those words mean? I hope this makes my original question clearer.


"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
Go to Top of Page

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  12:24:08  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Janko,I understand totally your comments now,its nothing at all to do with the words it is due to your feelings on colonisation by the white man in the past, this became very clear to me when I read the link in KOBO's post:
"I feel sorry for my poor Gambians: even the National Anthem they sing to so heartily is a gift of the colonial power – a colonialist legacy!! "
Move on Janko,should we English people complain about being invaded by the Romans,by the Danes,by the Normans in the past,? not at all all these invaders have enriched our country with infrastructure,buildings,law making etc.
Unless you wish to bang on about this forever how about calling a truce ? you have your views others have different views and this can go on forever never reaching a consensus.

Peace ? No confusion there we all want that


quote:
Originally posted by kobo

JOLLOF NEWS;



"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 28 Feb 2012 12:26:33
Go to Top of Page

Janko

Gambia
1267 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  17:14:36  Show Profile  Visit Janko's Homepage Send Janko a Private Message
toubab,
no, that is not my reason. You just said what you think and I think you stand for it.
I beg of you not to assume what my position could be hence all conclusion drown from assumptions are misleading.

Clean your house before pointing a finger ... Never be moved by delirious Well-wishers in their ecstasy
Go to Top of Page

kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  20:47:04  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
MAAFANTA.COM;

"Very short and simple response to Dida Halake, the Pan African with British values. Mr Halake, what's up ? Are you lonely or home sick ? You preach Pan Africanism yet want to live and die in the icy cold of Britain. You want the Gambia National Anthem changed with no better substitute. Where you live in England, the common saying is that when a tool or an equipment works "you don't change it".

How did you come to the realisation that Gambia needs a change of the sacred National Anthem? If you feell that the anthem as it is has been so generously produced by a British colonial admnistrator, what is your business with that? We Gambians are grateful and will want the British Gentleman to enjoy the full pride and honour of providing us a National Anthem with song adapted from a local Kora tune everyone relates to. Don't you smell hypocricy in your ways of meddling and manipulative tactics as you strive to induce the knucklehead Yahya Jammeh you so often toy with ?

We want the Gambia National Anthem the way it is for nearly 50 years now. Don't get near this one. What Gambia needs changing is that army chief Yahya Jammeh. Halake you are not helping Gambia by your many cheeky ways.

By Babanata Bulukenseng"

Edited by - kobo on 28 Feb 2012 20:49:26
Go to Top of Page

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2012 :  22:36:23  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Quote from the above:

Where you live in England, the common saying is that when a tool or an equipment works "you don't change it".

In other words, for our US cousins, "If it ain't broke don't fix it"

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 28 Feb 2012 22:37:17
Go to Top of Page

kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2012 :  18:20:56  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
MAAFANTA.COM;

"My dear, where do you get the idea that “Halake wants to live and die in UK”??!!

The Smiling Coast is home, the Swahili Coast is home – and now even Dakar is home. I go to all this places today and put my feet up!

This is the longest I have remained in UK for the last 20 years, but only because my Fulani Princess is flourishing in her London primary school and I don’t want to uproot her until she finishes primary studies. For secondary schooling we may be heading for the Smiling Coast or the Swahili Coast where she will go to school and I will teach.

So I have no intention of “dying in UK” – that is why I built homes for my kids in Africa.

Now, you are a rude boy to call President Jammeh a “knuckle-head”. It takes a political genius to rule The Gambia for 17 years. All of you people always under-estimate Jammeh because you guys think you are better than him.

Listen, I may rumble with Jammeh now and then, but I have to tell you that on a personal level I like the man – though I admit Gambia is a dangerous place for someone who likes provoking others like me or Prince Sankanu to go just now. But I did not leave The Gambia because of Jammeh; I left because there were one or two powerful people who wanted me dead – and Jammeh cannot protect you all the time.

As for “Halake provoking Gambians”, it is an educational methodology: to wake people up from their slumber. If I am in a class teaching I would do exactly the same: my sixth-form at Marina in 1997 walked in and opened their books to take down notes on the Second Word War. “What notes?” I asked. “Are we not going to do anything Sir?” they asked. “Oh, yes we are”, I said, “you guys are going to write some notes on the Second World War on the board and then into your
books”! By the end of the lesson we had had a good brain-storming session on the Second World War.

That is teaching. NOW, can you brainstorm on a Gambian National Anthem by a Gambian please!

Dida Jallow-Halake."

Edited by - kobo on 01 Mar 2012 18:26:23
Go to Top of Page

toubab1020



9007 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2012 :  19:16:21  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message
Dida Jallow-Halake. sorry, but I think that you just want an antagonistic discussion where no conclusion at all would be reached,to me its is obvious that your views are totally embedded and discusson will reach no conclusion at all and be a waste of time for everyone except you,but nothing at all to do with me, Momodou has created this free speech place on his own website so that bantaba members can share their views and indulge in discussions that interest them and they can learn from other peoples opinions.
Go ahead please if that's what you want to do with the National Anthem topic no one will stop you, but with world troubles and financial constraints everywhere and with the NA elections coming there will be much political banter here please join in that instead of nit picking on a few lines of verse.Your Choice of course.

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 01 Mar 2012 19:19:08
Go to Top of Page

kobo



United Kingdom
7765 Posts

Posted - 04 Mar 2012 :  18:44:24  Show Profile Send kobo a Private Message
We tend to forget that there is an adapted version of Gambia national anthem in wollof vernacular, traditionally sang after the official national anthem by school children at Independence celebrations, ever since it was formally launched initially for Primary school kids in Greater Banjul late 60s or around early 70s to-date? For this version composer is a Gambian, meeting Halake's radical demands on the need to make our national anthem completely indigenous to nation

We may recalled also that celebration of Independence day was concentrated at July 22nd Square (formerly Maccarthy Square) in Banjul city (formerly Bathurst); whereby wollof predominantly spoken around during those days

After 1, 2, 3 for some of the lyrics I can remember since childhood being;

Wollof
  • "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam! Chorus follows for ("Bob baam!")

  • "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam! "Bob baam!" "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam!"

  • "Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe" Chorus follows for ("Ngeringe!")

  • "Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe" Ngeringe!" ""Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe"

  • "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!" Chorus follows for ("Wootfi!")

  • "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!" "Wootfi!" "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!"

English Translation
  • "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam! Chorus follows for ("Bob baam!") Its time to work and perform as Gambia gain its Independence! Independent?

  • "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam! "Bob baam!" "Leegaye jotna Gambia am naa bob baam!" A repeat of above translation?

  • "Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe" Chorus follows for ("Ngeringe!") Cultivate the land for fruitful labour and discover abundance?

  • "Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe" Ngeringe!" ""Baiye len sufsi lichineh am ngeringe" A repeat of above translation?

  • "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!" Chorus follows for ("Wootfi!") We got our independent sovereignty without any spillage of blood?

  • "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!" "Wootfi!" "Jot nenge rewmi teh dehret tooroowootfi!"A repeat of above translation?

I can remember the composer (was known to me), a prominent music teacher and choir leader of Gambia Anglican Church; who went around all Banjul schools with his trumpet to set the tune properly! He could be with a surname like Mr. George

Hope Kondorong and other professional historians will dilate further; especially finding out original writer and composer?

Edited by - kobo on 04 Mar 2012 20:18:29
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
| More
Jump To:
Bantaba in Cyberspace © 2005-2017 Nijii Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.17 seconds. User Policy, Privacy & Disclaimer | Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.06