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Momodou



Denmark
10505 Posts

Posted - 01 Aug 2021 :  15:57:42  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
GAMBIA-L Digest 94

Topics covered in this issue include:

1) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
2)
by nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
3) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by chakys@image.dk
4)
by nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
5) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
6) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Abdou Touray <abdou@cs.columbia.edu>
7) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
8) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
9) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by MJagana@aol.com
10) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by MJagana@aol.com
11) Re: Membership to The List
by BAKSAWA@aol.com
12) New Member
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
13) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
14) MY CONSCIENCE
by amadou.kabir.njie@nsw.no
15) pls. unsubscribe
by Andrea Klumpp <klumpp@kar.dec.com>
16) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
17) The NARR Question?????? In The Gambia
by "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
18) Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
19) Re: How Smart Are You?
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
20) Re: Hello
by "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
21) sorry ... personal message mistakenly sent
by "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
22) Reparations for the injustices of slavery
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
23) Re: ASA Meeting, Columbus, Ohio
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
24) Re: Africa in the fast-globalizing world economy
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
25) Re: Are some African women feminists?
by LAMIN CEESAY <ceesay@bellsouth.net>
26) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Per Grotnes <perg@nfh.uit.no>
27) Re: ASA Meeting, Columbus, Ohio
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
28) RE: Are some African women feminists?
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
29) SUBSCRIBE
by "alieu badara" <alieu@hotmail.com>
30) Dr. Gamble...info request
by EStew68064@aol.com
31) RE: Reparations for the injustices of slavery
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
32) New Member
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
33) Re: Are some African women feminists?
by "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
34) Re: Are some African women feminists?
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
35) Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
by Gunjur@aol.com
36) QUOTE OF THE DAY
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
37) Humor: Is this your kind of guy?
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
38) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
39) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
40) Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
by "NJAGA JAGNE" <jagnen25@hotmail.com>
41) Re: Are some African women feminists?
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
42) SUBSCRIBE
by "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
43) ASA--Hello
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
44) RE: Are some African women feminists?
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
45) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
46) ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (fwd)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
47) Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
by "Bala Jallow" <bala@algonet.se>
48) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
49) Re: Are some African women feminists?
by "Amadou L. Fall" <jambaar@enter.net>
50) some questions
by "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
51) Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
by "wendela@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
52) Re:reparations
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
53) "Rotal"
by SANG1220@aol.com
54) Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
by TOURAY1@aol.com
55) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
56) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
57) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
58) Re: some questions
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
59) No Subject
by Gunjur@aol.com
60) Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
61)
by MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU
62) Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA - By Obaro Ikime (fwd)
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
63) Mobutus gold in the Gambia
by "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
64) Mobutu's gold in Gambia
by Gunjur@aol.com
65) Gambian students and Nigeria
by Gunjur@aol.com
66) Please forward: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
by Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
67) Please fwd:Re: Are some African women feminists?
by Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
68) Re: Gambian students and Nigeria
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
69) Gambian students in Nigeria
by Gunjur@aol.com
70) Re: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA - By Obaro Ikime (fwd)
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
71) Power failure in the new Airport building.
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
72) Back fro Gambia
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
73) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
74) Re: Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
by "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
75) Re: Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
by "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
76) Re: Gambian students in Nigeria
by "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
77) New members
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
78) Re: No Subject
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
79) Re: Update
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
80) Re: Back fro Gambia
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
81) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
82) Re: Ethnicity and Identity
by "narb@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
83) Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
84) Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
85) Re: Ethnicity and Identity - correction
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
86) Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
87) Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
88) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
89) Dr. Ali Mazrui on Nigeria and Sierra Leone
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
90) RE: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
91) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by Shieboyc@aol.com
92) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
93) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
94) introduction
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
95) new members
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
96) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady (fwd)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
97) Re: introduction
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
98) Re: Back fro Gambia
by "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
99) Re: introduction
by edi sidibeh <lha7edsi@kyamk.fi>
100) Tragic death of =
by Gunjur@aol.com
101) Immigration Update (New Immigration Law)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
102) RE: Tragic death of =
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
103) Africa news highlights
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
104) Re: Tragic death of =
by msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
105) Re: Tragic death of =
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
106) Dr. Marable on GLOBALIZATION, CYBERSPACE AND RACISM
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
107) QUOTE OF THE DAY
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
108) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
109) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
110) Re: new members
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
111) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
112) 50 Dalasi Notes On The Offer
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
113) Re: Tragic death of =
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
114) RE: Tragic death of =
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
115) Dr. Mazrui on Nigeria.... and CODESRIA BULLETIN
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
116) New members
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
117) New member
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
118) Re: Tragic death of =
by "FIND THE GOOD IN EVERY PERSON...FOR EVRYONE DOES HAVE ONE" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
119) Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
120) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
121) Re: Tragic death of =
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
122) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
123) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
124) White sports in White America....
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
125) Fwd: HUM: A Skin Transplant (**1/2)
by "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
126) new members
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
127) Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
128) Re: White sports in White America....
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
129) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by Musa Sowe <chemsm@panther.Gsu.EDU>
130) Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
131) Re: Tragic death of =
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
132) Alieu Badara Jallow
by BAKSAWA@aol.com
133) FW: Tragic death of =
by Compaq Customer <seela@oz.net>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 09 Nov 1997 16:28:54 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <34665545.12B3@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Habib!
You wrote:
> =

I would like to probably change this topic with the permission of the
> > list managers and request if we can please kindly end this Narr issue=

> > =

> > One of the greatest success stories of USA , Israel and Lebanon(first=
to
> > start this program in the world) and now about 50 countries including=
big
> > brother NIGERIA is " DUAL Nationality "
=

=

I discussed the same issue with Halifa Sallah during his trip to
Stockholm in February 1996. It was before the draft constitution was
released. He asked me to write a letter which would be published in
Foroyaa and forwarded to the committee which was then responsible for
taking proposals to include in the draft constitution. Halifa was very
receptive to the idea after the discussion and promised to do all he
could to make it possible for the provision to be included in the draft
constitution. =

I have found the letter which is over 3 pages long but I cannot find
the disk on which I saved it. I=B4ll try to summarise what I wrote. I
began by appealing to all the people working on the draft constitution
to include a provision enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of
other countries without forfeiting their Gambian citizenship and put it
before the Gambian people for approval. I motivated this by giving the
following benefits which could be reaped by both individual Gambians and
the country as a whole.
First, I gave the example of the Ghanaian government which around
1992/93 proposed a bill to enable Ghanaians to acquire dual citizenship.
The government realised then that Ghanaians abroad were playing a very
important role in the country=B4s economic life. It realised that the
amount of money transferred to Ghana by its citizens abroad was nearly
double the government=B4s yearly budget. I urged that a study be carried
out to measure the amount of money transferred to The Gambia yearly by
Gambians abroad.
Second, in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one has to
be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually responsible
and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulated
for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship. If they
were allowed dual citizenship, they would be able to provide more for
their families back home because of the increase in their salaries
whilst gaining valuable work experience which would be beneficial to The
Gambia when they return home.
Third, enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of other countries
would make it easier for them to acquire loans and invest in certain
types of businesses thereby increasing the amount of money that they are
able to transfer to The Gambia.
Fourth, Gambians abroad play an important role in the economic and
infrastructural development of The Gambia. Many Gambians shoulder the
responsibility of being the sole providers. Their families depend on
them for food, clothes, shelter, education etc. They are therefore
helping to ease the burden on the government because the social
implications would have been numerous if the money they send back home
was not there - mass school dropouts because of the government=B4s
inability to provide scholarships for all the needy, an increase in
crime, prostitution whether literally or through having many partners to
take care of one=B4s economic needs etc. The infrastuctural development
role can be evidenced by teh number of buildings erected by Gambians
abroad in Banjul, Serrekunda, Kotu, Kerr Serigne to name a few places.
Fifth, Gambians abroad provide employment opportunities for building
contractors, masons, carpenters, taxi drivers, bankers, insurance
people, sales people etc. Making it possible for them to acquire dual
citizenship would help them provide more employment opportunities back
home because of increased opportunities in their countries of residence.
Sixth, one of the most important reasons for making it possible for
Gambians to acquire dual citizenship is eduaction. In terms of
eligibility for scholarships, student loans and most important,
eligibility to pay home fees instead of international students=B4 fees. I=

gave examples of two British universities. The Imperial College of
Science, Technology and Medicine in London charged for example European
Union students wishing to study Mathematics for the 1995/96 academic
year =A3750 and international students =A37,450. For Clinical Medicine, t=
he
fee was =A32,800 for European Union students and =A315,000 for internatio=
nal
students. Middlesex University charged European Union students =A33,000
for the MA Economics for the same academic year and international
students =A36,400. The differences are staggering! If it is made easier
for Gambians to acquire dual citizenship, The Gambia would have more
qualified citizens at no cost to the state whilst releasing the
country=B4s meagre resources to more needy people.
Seventh, if Gambians could acquire dual citizenship, they could
contribute to the country=B4s development through projects which target
areas such as agriculture, education, drug control etc. by becoming
bolder as citizens to approach government agencies and ministries. They
could even work in responsible positions in those same agencies and
ministries because they meet the citizenship qualifications set for
certain jobs in some countries.
The dual citizenship issue was catered for during the Jawara regime
albeit on a selective basis. Foreigners who could invest a certain
amount of money were given Gambian passports whilst they maintained
their country=B4s passports. Gambians abroad were acquiring citizenships
of other countries whilst maintaining their Gambian citizenship. Section
10 (1 and 2)of the 1970 Constitution provided that the Minister
responsible for citizenship affairs could deprive a person of his/her
Gambian citizenship if the Minister finds out that that person has
either acquired the citizenship of another country or enjoyed certain
rights or practised certain obligations accorded only to citizens of
that country. This in essence meant that Gambians could have dual
citizenship as long as the Minister didn=B4t know. What the Minister know=

didn=B4t hurt.
Many Gambians are willing to acquire citizenship of other countries but
are afraid to do so because of fear of harassment and victimisation
should they return home. Cases abound where immigration officials have
harassed Gambians who have naturalised abroad at Banjul International
Airport. I have heard of two Gambians who have naturalised in Sweden
being deported from The Gambia because they overstayed during visits to
the country!
I concluded the letter by writing:"Having discussed some of the
benefits of enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of other
countries without forfeiting their Gambian citizenship, I feel that it
is something worth considering given the numerous benefits to individual
Gambians, their families, the government and society as a whole. I am
therefore appealing to your party (PDOIS), the Gambia Government,
members of the committee responsible for the draft constitution, all the
other parties and the Gambian population in general to make this vital
provision possible in the Constitution for the Second Republic. If this
is something that cannot be possible, please fight to make it possible
for Gambians who have naturalised abroad to come back home without
needing visas, staying there permanently and not being harassed and
deported by Immigration officials."
I noticed a provision in the draft constitution which can somehow be
interpreted as giving Gambians permission to acquire dual citizenship. I
stand corrected if someone else more qualified to judge the nitty gritty
of the provision finds to the contrary. Section 13 (4) reads: "Nothing
in this or any other provision of this Constitution or any other law
shall be construed as depriving, or authorising any person or authority
to deprive, any citizen of The Gambia by birth or descent of his or her
citizenship of The Gambia whether on account of such citizen=B4s holding
the citizenship or nationality of some other country or for any other
cause". The important difference between this provision and that of
section 10 (1 and 2) of the 1970 Constitution is that the draft
Consitution does not authorise any person or authority to deprive a
Gambian who naturalised in another country whilst the 1970 Constitution
authorised the Minister to do so. I=B4m not sure whether section 13 (4)
was adopted in the Constitution for the Second Republic. Maybe someone
who has the Constitution can confirm this.
Another important distinction between the draft Constitution and the
1970 one on this issue is that section 14 of the draft Constitution
provides: "A citizen of The Gambia who loses his or her citizenship of
The Gambia as a result of the acquisition or possession of the
citizenship of some other country shall, on the renunciation of the
citizenship of that other country, be entitled to be registered, or if
he or she was formerly a citizen by birth or descent, to be officially
recognised, as a citizen of The Gambia." This makes it possible for
those who are required by countries in which they naturalise to give up
their Gambian citizenship to regain their Gambian citizenship should
they wish. Such a provision was not present in the 1970 Constitution.
Again, I do not know whether this section of the draft proposal was
adopted. Maybe someone can confirm this. =

Sorry for such a long post. I hope that despite its length it is
helpful on the issue of dual citizenship.
Buharry.
Habib Ghanim wrote:
> =

> =

> =

>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 09:55:47 -0500
From: nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <19971109.095548.3398.1.nahak@juno.com>

Listmember re-subscribe me at this email, nahak@juno.com. My name is
Michael Gomez.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 15:58:02 +0200
From: chakys@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <199711091457.PAA10636@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Hello to the G-lers,
I think that the narr's issue is shameful; because of the lack of
tolerance and the right to the difference. The narr or lebanases are
probably bad examples in Gambia, but the main question is who help
them to be that bad according to our economic and social norms.
I think you should better point at our leaders who give the
opportunity to such a kind of unpleasant situation. They have to be
more responsible in order to give a priority to the people
well-being.
Honestly! people who'd been living over the years in the Gambia must
be considered as normal cityzens. I do believe their contributions
can be great. The diversity can just be an advantage. The U.S is a
typical example . Think about it!!!!!!!!
The national convergence will give a better chance to all those
peoples who are not feeling to be gambians. They will really
appreciate that. We have to admit as a fact that the narr' shops are
a great convenience to be all over the country.
We need to stop being corrupted and give more opportunities to any of
us to improve our living condition and empede the xenophoby to take
over our indulgence.
Chakys.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 10:34:07 -0500
From: nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <19971109.103409.3398.0.nahak@juno.com>

Listmember, please subscribe Abdoulie S. Jallow. His e-mail address is
B6L6@MUSICB.MCGILL.CA

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 09 Nov 1997 11:44:59 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp3.erols.com
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <346612BB.3A75@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
> =

> Hi Habib!
> You wrote:
> >
> I would like to probably change this topic with the permission of the
> > > list managers and request if we can please kindly end this Narr issue=

> > >
> > > One of the greatest success stories of USA , Israel and Lebanon(first=
to
> > > start this program in the world) and now about 50 countries including=
big
> > > brother NIGERIA is " DUAL Nationality "
> =

> =

> I discussed the same issue with Halifa Sallah during his trip to
> Stockholm in February 1996. It was before the draft constitution was
> released. He asked me to write a letter which would be published in
> Foroyaa and forwarded to the committee which was then responsible for
> taking proposals to include in the draft constitution. Halifa was very
> receptive to the idea after the discussion and promised to do all he
> could to make it possible for the provision to be included in the draft
> constitution.
> I have found the letter which is over 3 pages long but I cannot f=
ind
> the disk on which I saved it. I=B4ll try to summarise what I wrote. I
> began by appealing to all the people working on the draft constitution
> to include a provision enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of
> other countries without forfeiting their Gambian citizenship and put it
> before the Gambian people for approval. I motivated this by giving the
> following benefits which could be reaped by both individual Gambians and
> the country as a whole.
> First, I gave the example of the Ghanaian government which around=

> 1992/93 proposed a bill to enable Ghanaians to acquire dual citizenship.
> The government realised then that Ghanaians abroad were playing a very
> important role in the country=B4s economic life. It realised that the
> amount of money transferred to Ghana by its citizens abroad was nearly
> double the government=B4s yearly budget. I urged that a study be carried
> out to measure the amount of money transferred to The Gambia yearly by
> Gambians abroad.
> Second, in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one h=
as to
> be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually responsible
> and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulated
> for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship. If they
> were allowed dual citizenship, they would be able to provide more for
> their families back home because of the increase in their salaries
> whilst gaining valuable work experience which would be beneficial to The
> Gambia when they return home.
> Third, enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of other coun=
tries
> would make it easier for them to acquire loans and invest in certain
> types of businesses thereby increasing the amount of money that they are
> able to transfer to The Gambia.
> Fourth, Gambians abroad play an important role in the economic an=
d
> infrastructural development of The Gambia. Many Gambians shoulder the
> responsibility of being the sole providers. Their families depend on
> them for food, clothes, shelter, education etc. They are therefore
> helping to ease the burden on the government because the social
> implications would have been numerous if the money they send back home
> was not there - mass school dropouts because of the government=B4s
> inability to provide scholarships for all the needy, an increase in
> crime, prostitution whether literally or through having many partners to
> take care of one=B4s economic needs etc. The infrastuctural development
> role can be evidenced by teh number of buildings erected by Gambians
> abroad in Banjul, Serrekunda, Kotu, Kerr Serigne to name a few places.
> Fifth, Gambians abroad provide employment opportunities for build=
ing
> contractors, masons, carpenters, taxi drivers, bankers, insurance
> people, sales people etc. Making it possible for them to acquire dual
> citizenship would help them provide more employment opportunities back
> home because of increased opportunities in their countries of residence.
> Sixth, one of the most important reasons for making it possible f=
or
> Gambians to acquire dual citizenship is eduaction. In terms of
> eligibility for scholarships, student loans and most important,
> eligibility to pay home fees instead of international students=B4 fees. I=

> gave examples of two British universities. The Imperial College of
> Science, Technology and Medicine in London charged for example European
> Union students wishing to study Mathematics for the 1995/96 academic
> year =A3750 and international students =A37,450. For Clinical Medicine, t=
he
> fee was =A32,800 for European Union students and =A315,000 for internatio=
nal
> students. Middlesex University charged European Union students =A33,000
> for the MA Economics for the same academic year and international
> students =A36,400. The differences are staggering! If it is made easier
> for Gambians to acquire dual citizenship, The Gambia would have more
> qualified citizens at no cost to the state whilst releasing the
> country=B4s meagre resources to more needy people.
> Seventh, if Gambians could acquire dual citizenship, they could
> contribute to the country=B4s development through projects which target
> areas such as agriculture, education, drug control etc. by becoming
> bolder as citizens to approach government agencies and ministries. They
> could even work in responsible positions in those same agencies and
> ministries because they meet the citizenship qualifications set for
> certain jobs in some countries.
> The dual citizenship issue was catered for during the Jawara regi=
me
> albeit on a selective basis. Foreigners who could invest a certain
> amount of money were given Gambian passports whilst they maintained
> their country=B4s passports. Gambians abroad were acquiring citizenships
> of other countries whilst maintaining their Gambian citizenship. Section
> 10 (1 and 2)of the 1970 Constitution provided that the Minister
> responsible for citizenship affairs could deprive a person of his/her
> Gambian citizenship if the Minister finds out that that person has
> either acquired the citizenship of another country or enjoyed certain
> rights or practised certain obligations accorded only to citizens of
> that country. This in essence meant that Gambians could have dual
> citizenship as long as the Minister didn=B4t know. What the Minister know=

> didn=B4t hurt.
> Many Gambians are willing to acquire citizenship of other countri=
es but
> are afraid to do so because of fear of harassment and victimisation
> should they return home. Cases abound where immigration officials have
> harassed Gambians who have naturalised abroad at Banjul International
> Airport. I have heard of two Gambians who have naturalised in Sweden
> being deported from The Gambia because they overstayed during visits to
> the country!
> I concluded the letter by writing:"Having discussed some of the
> benefits of enabling Gambians to acquire the citizenship of other
> countries without forfeiting their Gambian citizenship, I feel that it
> is something worth considering given the numerous benefits to individual
> Gambians, their families, the government and society as a whole. I am
> therefore appealing to your party (PDOIS), the Gambia Government,
> members of the committee responsible for the draft constitution, all the
> other parties and the Gambian population in general to make this vital
> provision possible in the Constitution for the Second Republic. If this
> is something that cannot be possible, please fight to make it possible
> for Gambians who have naturalised abroad to come back home without
> needing visas, staying there permanently and not being harassed and
> deported by Immigration officials."
> I noticed a provision in the draft constitution which can somehow=
be
> interpreted as giving Gambians permission to acquire dual citizenship. I
> stand corrected if someone else more qualified to judge the nitty gritty
> of the provision finds to the contrary. Section 13 (4) reads: "Nothing
> in this or any other provision of this Constitution or any other law
> shall be construed as depriving, or authorising any person or authority
> to deprive, any citizen of The Gambia by birth or descent of his or her
> citizenship of The Gambia whether on account of such citizen=B4s holding
> the citizenship or nationality of some other country or for any other
> cause". The important difference between this provision and that of
> section 10 (1 and 2) of the 1970 Constitution is that the draft
> Consitution does not authorise any person or authority to deprive a
> Gambian who naturalised in another country whilst the 1970 Constitution
> authorised the Minister to do so. I=B4m not sure whether section 13 (4)
> was adopted in the Constitution for the Second Republic. Maybe someone
> who has the Constitution can confirm this.
> Another important distinction between the draft Constitution and =
the
> 1970 one on this issue is that section 14 of the draft Constitution
> provides: "A citizen of The Gambia who loses his or her citizenship of
> The Gambia as a result of the acquisition or possession of the
> citizenship of some other country shall, on the renunciation of the
> citizenship of that other country, be entitled to be registered, or if
> he or she was formerly a citizen by birth or descent, to be officially
> recognised, as a citizen of The Gambia." This makes it possible for
> those who are required by countries in which they naturalise to give up
> their Gambian citizenship to regain their Gambian citizenship should
> they wish. Such a provision was not present in the 1970 Constitution.
> Again, I do not know whether this section of the draft proposal was
> adopted. Maybe someone can confirm this.
> Sorry for such a long post. I hope that despite its length it is
> helpful on the issue of dual citizenship.
> Buharry.
> Habib Ghanim wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >Buharry
What a great deed
I support you and will do anything to make this possible
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 09 Nov 1997 15:35:00 -0500
From: Abdou Touray <abdou@cs.columbia.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <34661E74.25F36036@cs.columbia.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi folks,

BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH wrote:

> Well,I think you are wrong,for the simple reason that when a group is
> defined by behavior as opposed to physical appearance that is not
> normally
> considered as racism or groupism.

I think the above statement is contradicted by the fact that racism
is typically characterized by blanket stereotyping based on behavior.
E.g. "Xs are thieves, lazy, do not like strife, etc.". I think the
blind obsession with behavior is what makes racism the Grand and
Dangerous Illogic that it is. As with immigrant elsewhere, Middle
Eastern immigration to The Gambia has added a certain vitality and
entrepreneurial spirit to the national character. These immigrants, for
the most part, tend to be very hardworking, tenacious businessmen
taking risks few Gambians dare take. If the culture of the corrupt
bureaucrat and soldier/President gives way to that of individual
responsibility typified by the Gambian-Lebanese, I am sure we will be a
more prosperous and peaceful country. After all, a test of a citizen's
loyalty should not be how willing she is to risk her life by staying put
during turmoil, but rather, how much she is willing to contribute to the
social good.
Thanks and bye for now,
-Abdou.


> The injustice in racism is that it blames
> people for the way they look,something nobody can do anything
> about.But of
> course all of us know how to change the way we do things when the
> people we
> deal with don't approve.The yardstick we apply on gambians is even
> stricter.Maybe you should,given that you are a little bit new in the
> gambia,ask what has happened to those Gambians who had been engaged in
> such
> practices during the FaFa Jawara era.The Gambia we are envisaging is a
> fair
> country but which must not be taken for granted by either by gambians
> or
> Non-Gambians.
>
>
> Regards
> Bassss!
> -----Original Message-----
> From: jgr@commit.gm <gambia-l@commit.gm>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Date: 08/ÑÌÈ/1418 02:14 Õ
> Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
>
> Sent by "Jorn Grotnes" <jgr@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
> Bass
>
> >to its miniscule landmass that non-gambians who demonstrated their
> lack of
> >care for the country and its people should not be given the
> opportunity to
>
> How about Gambians that demonstrated the same?
>
> the way you put it it seems that you don't want to banish individuals,
> but
> rather handle the group as a whole. So if some of the group
> (arbitrarily
> defined by who? Yourself?) are "chickening out", throw the whole group
> out
> (or at least don't trust them). This is a sort of racism (groupism) or
> am I
> wrong?
>
> Jorn
> Commit
> The Gambia





------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 18:59:13 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971109174349.29136A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi folks,
as far as I am concerned, the debate about "Ethnicity and
Identity" is over with. I think that the market place of ideas has
prevailed because we have engaged in a dialoque in which we have agree to
disagree. I have gained more insight about the Lebanese because of other
peoples contribution to the debate. It is very important that we talk
about issues that are normally meant for the closet because they help us
understand more about each others heritage and our differences
Our prejudices can be overcome when we discover just how much we really
have in common with our peers from other ethnic groups.


Si Jama,
Daddy Njie.






"What's that thing?"
"Well, it's a highly technical, sensitive instrument we use in
computer repair. Being a layman, you probably can't grasp exactly what
it does. We call it a two-by-four."
-- Jeff MacNelley, "Shoe"


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 09 Nov 1997 20:22:13 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp2.erols.com
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <34668BF5.2963@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Nyang Njie wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
> as far as I am concerned, the debate about "Ethnicity and
> Identity" is over with. I think that the market place of ideas has
> prevailed because we have engaged in a dialoque in which we have agree to
> disagree. I have gained more insight about the Lebanese because of other
> peoples contribution to the debate. It is very important that we talk
> about issues that are normally meant for the closet because they help us
> understand more about each others heritage and our differences
> Our prejudices can be overcome when we discover just how much we really
> have in common with our peers from other ethnic groups.
>
> Si Jama,
> Daddy Njie.
>
> "What's that thing?"
> "Well, it's a highly technical, sensitive instrument we use in
> computer repair. Being a layman, you probably can't grasp exactly what
> it does. We call it a two-by-four."
> -- Jeff MacNelley, "Shoe"

Daddy
I agree with you and also thank you for the other view points you brought
up .
Sometimes we all cover behind smoking screens and trow in red herrings to
divert the real issues. Bala & family the sex of Joanna was not the issue
.. I just wanted you to be aware of a possible oversight.
Folks I really liked Buharry's piece on DUAL NATIONALITY. I think some of
the old politician's fears for opposing the idea were that some of us (if
we have another citizenship apart from the Gambian) would return home and
challenge them for their offices , which is our right anyway. All of the
Gambians should be encouraged to return back to contribute to the
national development of the country no matter what happened in the past(
except for criminal or corrupt convicted persons)
I believe that Gambia was open to this dual citizenship before we became
a Republic- Please correct me anyone if I am wrong.
peace
Habibb

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 20:54:35 -0500 (EST)
From: MJagana@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <971109205433_1548224779@mrin39>

In a message dated 97-11-07 05:34:03 EST, you write:

<< That is the bottom line and that is why this debate is very
,very important. >>


Dear Bass,

I agree with you but I think we need to look beyound the people moving out
in bad times, and look at those who create these situations. If we had
leaders that do not mismanage and corrupt our economies I believe we us a
nation can strive without depending on these narrs.

It is made much easier for these Narrs to cut through the breaucratic paper
work and start operating thier businesses, than it is for the native
Gambians.

The Narrs might be part of the problem, but the root of the problem is the
corrupt systems that run our countries, and at the same time is ruining our
economy.


momodou J

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 21:09:10 -0500 (EST)
From: MJagana@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <971109210910_969086098@mrin79>

In a message dated 97-11-07 18:21:34 EST, you write:

<< I have been to many
> super markets back home and to my dismay I have found expired food being
> sold at exorbitant prices that forced me to believe that the owners of
> those super markets do not care about the well being of the Gambians. C >>


Dear Daddy Njie,
I very much understand your point, but if these expired food products are
displayed for sale, then what is the use of Board of Health, or the
regulators are they not aware of this.

MOMODOU J

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 22:24:26 -0500 (EST)
From: BAKSAWA@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Membership to The List
Message-ID: <971109222053_-1459850234@mrin54.mail.aol.com>

Mr. Sanyang:

I am sorry to disappoint you, but I am not the Awa Sey in question. I lived
at Haddington Street. However, Awa and and her twin brother Adama (nicknamed
"Benz") were friends of mine.

Thanks!

Awa Sey

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 9 Nov 1997 22:14:17 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <199711100416.WAA20214@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi folks,

i've just added a our newest subscriber to Gambia-l, Keretha Cash. i've
already sent her info on how to communicate with Gambia-L, and hope she
sends in her self-intro as soon as she settles down to the list. welcome
to Gambia-L Karetha.

have a great week!

Katim


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 01:35:22 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <9711100635.AA28124@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Nyang Njie wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
> as far as I am concerned, the debate about "Ethnicity and
> Identity" is over with. I think that the market place of ideas has
> prevailed because we have engaged in a dialoque in which we have agree to
> disagree. I have gained more insight about the Lebanese because of other
> peoples contribution to the debate. It is very important that we talk
> about issues that are normally meant for the closet because they help us
> understand more about each others heritage and our differences
> Our prejudices can be overcome when we discover just how much we really
> have in common with our peers from other ethnic groups.
>
> Si Jama,
> Daddy Njie.

Brother Nyang, I also agree with you, wholeheartedly, that we have learned
very important lessons on this issue. If you recall, when I first brought
up this topic, I had only two questions in mind:

1. Assuming that the consciousness of "other" ethnic groups were not
present in the Gambia around the 1900s, when were these groups
invented?

2. How have these groups influenced the shaping of ideas and attitudes
about
ourselves and how has their presence in the Gambia helped the counry
both
economically and socially?

The response was great! To be honest, I didn't quite expect all these
responses. I counted over 35 responses - the most ever for any topic ever
to be discussed on Gambia-L, since I have been a member more than a year
ago. What was very interesting was that we were able to debate the issue
like mature and professional adults without resulting to personal attacks
that is sometimes common on Lists such as Gambia-L. Infact, I was hesitant
to bring up the subject because I thought that some people (like brother
Habib) might take it offensively. Fortunately for me, they have the
understanding that a purposeful dialogue and learning is all that we are
here for. We, the members of Gambia-L, can only talk. We cannot implement
any laws or changes but we can make a difference by discussing the issues
that we feel are necessary (and by making our voices heard) for the
improvement of our beloved country. If only we could relay our ideas to
our politicians and government, then we would have done our part in
assisting in the development of the Gambia.

Now that we have beaten up this topic, Ethnicity and Identity, to the
ground, I feel it is time to move on to other things until such time that
it becomes warranted to talk about it again. And believe me, it willcome
around again in a different form. The nature of internet discussion is
that things tend to go around in circles, and what you say today will come
back many days/weeks/years later haunting you.

Let's continue to keep the discussion alive and healthy.

Best Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

==========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

PS What I really hope to get out of this is some prospective business
partners. Habib, Jabou and others, can we meet in 'secret' to discuss
potential business partnerships? I am all ears for such issues. Habib, you
will be very welcomed to Atlanta. Let me know (via private mail)in advance
so I can make time to meet with you. As you know, In America, every second
is accounted for. Thanks.


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 09:58:00 +0100
From: amadou.kabir.njie@nsw.no
To: Gambia-L@u.washington.edu
Subject: MY CONSCIENCE
Message-ID: <3466d065.narud@relay.nsw.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1; name=body.txt


MY CONSCIENCE

My conscience?
What about it? Leave it alone!
My soul is on fire
My mind is roaming in search of vanity
Doesn=C9t anyone realise
I have been raised up to believe
In a strong sense of right and wrong
Then advised
Not to right a wrong
When that wrong does not have anything to do with my person
When that wrong may jeopardise my personal ambition
Yet I have been taught
The personal
The immediate family
The extended family
The tribe (village)
The nation (race)
Are inter-linked
I was put in a constant state of conflict
When I was taught
Wrong is not right
I am a prisoner of my conscience
Warded by laws
Laid down without my consent

Why am I?
Shall I just wither away
Like a leaf in the Scandinavian autumn
To be replaced by my offspring
Who shall in turn wither
Like their father before them?

Why am I so scared?
Scared?
Yes I am a coward
I am scared
Of being identified
Like Biko
Like Fanon
Like Ghandi
Like cheikh Anta
Like Danso
I just admire their courage
Or is it bravery?
That thing that drove them
And that which I lack
I so admire them
For doing what they did
For us
Yet I am hesitant
To even express sympathy
To express gratitude
Just in case...

Leave politics to the politicians
That race
=46rom outer space
Who are they?
Graduates of political science?

Biko was a medical student
So was Che
Fonon was a doctor who extended his psychiatric practice
Into rehabilitating his patients politically by means of guerrilla =

tactics
To free them from French tyranny
Which he found out was the main cause of their psychiatric condition

Ghandi was a lawyer
Who shelved his law books
To march the streets
To demand our rights

Cheikh Anta Diop?
He was an all-round scholar
A Mathematician
A Historian and
A philosopher

Danso was a =CAsoldier=CB
Who did not hesitate
To turn round
And point his gun
At the oppressor
Who was left to fabricate a lie
To explain his behaviour

Die for me and I=C9ll call you a hero
Or at worse try to ridicule you
Suffer for me and I=C9ll call you foolish
Don=C9t call me anything
I have no part in it
I just want to continue to exist
To continue to suffer in peace
To suffer like a coward
Don=C9t call me that either
I don=C9t want to be anybody=C9s hero

What do you want from me?
I am just another mortal soul
I pray five times a day
I got the message passed on to me
That if I don=C9t
I shall burn in hell
In a furnace
Whose smoke is even hotter
Than any mundane fire
Whose smoke is even hotter
Than the core of any nuclear reactor!
Why should I risk being scorched
In the mother fire that belches such fearful smoke
When I have the chance
To end up in paradise
Instead
Yes paradise!
Where I shall =CAlive=CB a boring but effortless existence
Where it is just sufficient to wish
And have your wish fulfilled
Dream of a beautiful woman and there She is
Long for a handsome man and there He is
Thirst for =CAataya=CB and feel the taste of =CAlewhal=CB in you mouth
And the preacher told me that
That existence is everlasting
An eternal existence!

Oh!
This world
Is just a place
That I happen
To be
Passing through

Oh!
My permanent abode
Is there
Where nobody has ever returned from!
It is my conscience!

A. Kabir Njie












---------------------------------------------------------------------
amadou.kabir.njie@nsw.no
Narud Stokke Wiig AS
R=E5dhusgt. 27
N-0158 OSLO
NORWAY
Tel: +47 22 33 06 70
Fax: +47 22 41 45 01
---------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 16:38:20 +0100
From: Andrea Klumpp <klumpp@kar.dec.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: pls. unsubscribe
Message-ID: <34672A6C.BA0@kar.dec.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello Listmanagers,

could you please unsubscribe me temporarily ?? Thank you !!

best, Andrea

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 11:17:26 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <34673396.3CCE@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
>
> Hi Habib!
> All the more reason to realise that some of the people erroneously
> referred to as "Nari Beirut" are as Gambian as Gambian can be. I don´t
> know much beyond my grandparents but I doubt if I can trace my Gambian
> roots as far back as you or the late Shyben Madi can. I´d probably be
> better off trying Senegal and beyond like many other Gambians. Yet here
> I am not knowing anywhere else and not feeling anything other than
> Gambian. How can we expect the so-called "Nari Beirut" who have lived in
> The Gambia for over a hundred years to feel anything other than Gambian?
> On the issue of Lebanese fleeing The Gambia if there should be trouble,
> who wouldn´t if they have the chance? It would be nice to know that
> there would be both Gambians and non-Gambians who would sacrifice both
> life and property to defend the country. However, reality would dictate
> that there would also be both Gambians and non-Gambians who would flee
> should such a day come (God forbid). You see, there are both heroes and
> cowards. There are also both powerful and powerless people and those who
> have everything to gain and those who have nothing to gain and cannot in
> anyway contribute to the war except in maybe being counted among the
> dead and wounded. Maybe the farthest most Gambians who flee will get to
> will be Senegal but some will definitely flee. Look at The Gambia today
> and see how many Sierra Leoneans and Liberians are present. The
> indigenous citizens of those countries did flee.
> Look at Gambians today. Most of us on this list are abroad. There is no
> war in The Gambia yet we have not gone home. Even though some of us are
> studying, there are many of us who have finished studying and possess
> qualifications that The Gambia desperately needs. But we have not gone
> home. What have we done? We have fled. Some say because of economic
> reasons, some because they didn´t agree with the Jawara regime, some
> because they do not agree with the Jammeh regime, some because of this
> and some because of that. The bottom line is that we have fled. So, let
> us be fair. If we are to blame foreigners who flee the country if there
> is war, let us first blame ourselves for fleeing in time of "peace". If
> we can do this, maybe we can justify blaming others for fleeing. Thanks.
> Buharry.
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Habib Ghanim wrote:
> >
> > MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi!
> > > I would like to throw into the debate something I read that surprised
> > > me a lot. I was surprised to read (I'm not sure if it was in the Point
> > > or Observer) after Shyben Madi´s death that he was born in The Gambia in
> > > 1890 (if I can correctly remember). I don´t know how many years his
> > > parents lived in the country before he was born or even if they were
> > > born there. What is clear is that 1890 was many years before many
> > > Gambians´ parents or grandparents moved to the Gambia from Senegal,
> > > Mali, Guinea etc. to make it possible for them to be born as Gambian
> > > citizens. I therefore think it is important to realise that some of the
> > > "Nari Beirut" are as Gambian as any of us can ever be because over a
> > > hundred years is a long time. Thanks.
> > > Buharry.
> >
> > Buharry
> > I think Shyben Madi's father was there way before 1890 and I have proof
> > also . My father for example was a friend of the famous chief of Fulladu
> > called Mussa Molloh, who always went to his shop to chat and do business.
> > Habib
Buharry
You are right. Many of us are here for several reasons but some of us
like myself have paid their dues to the Gambia by actually returning and
working in the commercial field and government too. I also contributed
to the development of the Gambian women's vegetable gardens program as I
was part of the idea since inception.( so I do not feel guilty being
here now after doing my part )
We must however never forget the folks back home .
Did you find the full document you had on dual nationality. I would like
to make reference to it of course with your consent.
Peace
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 21:58:19 +0300
From: "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: The NARR Question?????? In The Gambia
Message-ID: <01bcee0a$cbf8dfe0$402385c2@kolls567>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0004_01BCEE23.F14617E0"

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Jorn,

Thanks very much for your response!Well,even though I am a little =
swamped

by my job right now,I think I should indulge you and expand the frontier =
of

this debate "further" as you requested,esp. now that many of our =
colleagues

on the list here want us to brush the subject aside and put it under the

carpet.I have no problems with that except that I would want to know =
what it

is that everybody is in a hurry trying to put under the carpet here and =
why.Somebody

mentioned here that Gambian specialty called Masslaha

(ambivalence/hypocrisy),so does it have anything to do with that,or are =
they

right in suggesting we are trying to make a fuss about something that =
does

not exist and that there is no case to answer here? In any case,this is =
a National Security Issue as I see it ,and we will have to confront it =
sooner or later, so why not deal with it now!


But before presenting my case,I think I need to answer the specific

questions you put to me and also clarify what I perceive as a

misunderstanding on your part of my 'target group'.


First of all,I don't recall using the word,Lebanese in my last =
message.The

word I must have used is Narr,since I know that not all the Middle =
Easterns

that virtually control the Commercial Life of the Gambia come from

Lebanon.But, of course, we cannot ignore the fact the lion's share =
belongs to

that country.Then comes the Mauritanians,some =
Syrians,Palestinians,Egyptians

etc...


The second thing I want to do is to be on the record as saying that =
whenever

I mention Narr or Lebanese or whatever,that definitely cannot and does =
not include

those Gambians of Lebanese descent who were born brought

up,educated,socialised in Gambia and have a sense of belonging to the

country,neither me nor anybody anywhere has the slightest right to to =
refer

to them as anything other than Gambians.They are, in short, as Gambian =
as our National Anthem itself.But since I am perfectly comfortable with =
critically debating about Mali and Malians ,even though my Sarahule =
ancestors originally came from that country,I would assume that my =
Gambian compatriots of Lebanese,Syrian,palestinian or whatever descent =
are equally comfortable with talking about the people who come from =
those places to work in the Gambia.


The third thing I want to do is to inform you that the fact that I =
belong to

the list of those Gambians who have abandoned or run away from the =
Gambia or

whatever you would want to call it cannot and should not deny me my =
right to

participate and contribute in the fullest possible manner to 'the Aliens

Policy Debate'in my country,anymore than your present status as a =
Norwegian

doing business in the Gambia should deny you your birthright of having

something to say about what should be done about some of the the Gambian

residents in Norway who consistently abuse the generosity of their host

country.


So,maybe we can now talk about the Narr problem or the Lebanese if that =
is the word you prefer.For your information,Gambia is not at all unique =
among the black African countries whose commercial life,s Dependency on =
Asian Immigrants has approached infantile proportions.Just name any =
country south of the Sahara from Senegal to the Cape of good Hope,the =
cahnces are that, if that country has anything in it worth selling,the =
sellers are Asians,mostly Lebanese in West Africa and Indians in East =
and Southern Africa,and the buyers,who else, the poor black =
locals.Several years ago,when Senegal and Mauritania had their that =
infamous border clash and the Lebanese shop owners panicked and booked =
the first flights out of Yoff to Banjul,Freetown,Monrovia,Kinshasha etc. =
and the Mauritanian Shopkeepers too busy avoiding execution from a =
hysterical Senegalese youth,the food supplies for almost all the urban =
centers of Senegal came to an abrupt halt.Only those Senegalese close to =
the Gambian border were able to buy their daily essentials from that =
country.As unbelievable as the degree is to which Senegal's commercial =
life is held hostage by its Middle Eastern immigrants,that is nothing =
compared to the devastating economic strenght and control of the Indians =
of the commercial life of the Kenyan captial,Nairobi.When I visited that =
country in the mid eighties,you would have thought that,given my =
bringing up in Sere Kunda,a town in which owning a shop is almost equal =
to being an Asian(Bitiki Narr) -given that kind of culture in me,it =
should not have surprised me at all that in here also,another black =
African country,the people who own and run all the things that are worth =
running and owning are foreigners, the Asian immigrants;but, believe =
me,there was nothing in my that Sere Kunda experience that could have =
prepared me for the shock I was about to experience.In short,the Gambian =
situation was a day on the beach compared to what I saw in Kenya.I will =
not make here any mention of the almost sureal stiuation that had =
existed in the pre-Idi Amin era in Uganda ,in which a mere 72 thousand =
foreigners,almost all of them Indians, had controlled almost eighty =
percent of the wealth of entire Ugandan Nation.So much for the plight of =
other African countries.


So,who are Nay sayers on this List kidding,themselves or the helpless =
Gambian masses?And I want to know what they are trying to say here! Are =
they saying that there are no Narrs in the Gambia that own and control =
the bulk of what is worth owning and controlling in our nation's =
commercial sector;or are they saying that they are there but that they =
are now all citizens of of our country; or are they saying: yes ,they =
are there,and ,yes, they control a disproportionate portion of our =
commerce but that that is not a problem? If their reply is denying =
their existence then maybe we should do some mass psycho-analysing =
here.Because maybe then the Psychological Mechanism called 'state of =
denial' is at work here.That is a mechamism that the SELF uses to =
protect itself from the painful consequences of a problem it cannot =
solve or get away from.It does that by denying the very existence of the =
problem bugging it,on the one hand,and convincing itself at the =
sub-conscious level of that 'fact',on the other.But if their reply is =
that they are there, alright,but that all of them have acquired Gambian =
citizenship,I would say to them that I am very,very interested to know =
about that magical process that has made getting Gambian citizenship and =
setting up shops all over the place in the Gambia such a =
breeze!And,finally, if they reply that ,yes,they are there and,yes,they =
are not Gambian citizens,and yes,they are wielding an unacceptable =
amount of power and influence in our land but that, that is not a =
problem at all,then I would like to refer them to at least one Lebanese =
who thinks otherwise.That person is none other than a friend of mine =
here in Qatar who,when he once visited his wealthy cousin in the Gambia, =
did not fail to notice that there was something fundamentally flawed =
with the picture he saw down there.His disbelief with the surreal =
situation down there was not connected so much to the incredible amount =
of power and influence of his compatriots in the Gambia,but rather to =
the fact that very few Gambians seem to notice the tragic irony of the =
situation,let alone being bothered by it.My this smart Lebanese friend's =
honest observation is the direct result of his knowing deep down that =
there is no way,not in one million years,that the smartest Fulla =
entrepreneur,could achieve in Beirut what the dummest Lebanese =
entrepreneur is capable of achieving within just one year after =
overstaying his visiting visa and setting up a shop and started selling =
stuffs. Gambia,please,wake up!! The Roman historian,Pliny was =
right,there are certain things that can happen no where else except in =
Africa.Else,where on God's earth could life be so great for migrant =
workers!

I am a little bit confused about that mythtical commercial and =
entrepreneurial acumen of the Middle Easterns and its alleged attendant =
vitality.I am a little bit confused about the kinds of magical selling =
skills that they have demonstrated that the Badibunkas,the Fullas and =
the Sarahulehs cannot have if given the same opportunities.I am a little =
bit confused as to where this so-called vitality,which would be absent =
from the Gambia in their absence, has made itself felt in the lives of =
the ordinary Gambians.All these are very confusing to me;what is however =
not confusing to me is that Gambia is a tiny little country with a tiny =
economy much of which is controlled by non-Gambians who have,with very =
isolated exceptions,demonstrated over the decades that they are =
non-integrateable into the main stream Gambian society.Now,that could be =
a recipe for disaster in the future.The situation and the events that =
culminated into the 1972 crises in uganda looked dangerously similar to =
that of Gambia at present.The cliche that says that the people who don't =
learn from the lessons of history are condemned by it is as true today =
as it ever was.There is nothing wrong with making one's country's =
economy liberal and open to outside talent and investment,but only the =
naive would confuse that with giving the keys to the family treasury to =
foreigners.

This debate is not about racism,and it is not about xenophobia and it is =
not at the highest intellectual level even about Lebanon or Lebanese or =
Mauritania or Mauritanians,it is about how not to run a modern state =
like a traditional open village in which anybody could come from =
anywhere and build a hut in anywhere as long as there is an empty space =
left somewhere without much questioning.That is how we are and that is =
our heritage and there is a lot of good in it.But common sense requires =
that, since others don't don't treat us in their places with the kind of =
unrestrained village generosity that we are accustomed to treating their =
people in our places,maybe we should adjust our treatment of their =
people accordingly.That way ,we would achieve reciprocity,be fair to =
ourselves and maybe even win the respect of the people we deal with.

REGARDS BASSSS!

=20



=20




-----Original Message-----

From: jgr@commit.gm <gambia-l@commit.gm>

To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List

<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>

Date: Saturday, November 08, 1997 11:14 AM

Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity




Sent by "Jorn Grotnes" <jgr@commit.gm>

via Commit




Bass,


If you are willing to continue this discussion, I would like to argue

further;


>Well,I think you are wrong,for the simple reason that when a group is

>defined by behavior as opposed to physical appearance that is not =
normally

>considered as racism or groupism.


But you have not done that, on the contrary you have judged the =
behaiviour

of a group (the Lebanese) after the behaviour of some members of the =
group.

Or are you seriously meaning that ALL memebers of the group were =
behaving in

this way, and that the reason why you group them is their behaviour, =
rather

than the fact that they are Lebanese (which is very much "how they =
look")?


>Maybe you should,given that you are a little bit new in the gambia,ask =
what

has

>to those Gambians who had been engaged in such practices during


Why don't you enlighten me if you think it will help me to understand =
the

need to exclude Lebanese from Gambian business?

The fact that I have been in the Gambia for such a short period should =
not

matter, let's instead pretend I am completely ignorant of matters =
Gambian

(not far from the truth).

It seems to me that a lot of Gambians that abandoned their country in =
hard

times (something I do not condemn, like you seem to do) might be on this

very list.

Should they not be allowed to return to their own country if they wish? =
(I

must assume that, since they are to be "even stricter judged" than the

Lebanese?)


Please take note that I am talking principles here, since my factual

knowledge is extremely limited.


Best regards


Jorn

Commit

The Gambia









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<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV>
<P align=3Dleft>Jorn,</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Thanks very much for your response!Well,even though I am =
a little=20
swamped</P>
<P align=3Dleft>by my job right now,I think I should indulge you and =
expand the=20
frontier of</P>
<P align=3Dleft>this debate "further" as you requested,esp. =
now that=20
many of our colleagues</P>
<P align=3Dleft>on the list here want us to brush the subject aside and =
put it=20
under the</P>
<P align=3Dleft>carpet.I have no problems with that except that I would =
want to=20
know what it</P>
<P align=3Dleft>is that everybody is in a hurry trying to put under the =
carpet=20
here and why.Somebody</P>
<P align=3Dleft>mentioned here that Gambian specialty called =
Masslaha</P>
<P align=3Dleft>(ambivalence/hypocrisy),so does it have anything to do =
with=20
that,or are they</P>
<P align=3Dleft>right in suggesting we are trying to make a fuss about =
something=20
that does</P>
<P align=3Dleft>not exist and that there is no case to answer here? In =
any=20
case,this is a National Security Issue as I see it ,and we will have to =
confront=20
it sooner or later, so why not deal with it now!</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>But before presenting my case,I think I need to answer =
the=20
specific</P>
<P align=3Dleft>questions you put to me and also clarify what I perceive =
as a</P>
<P align=3Dleft>misunderstanding on your part of my 'target group'.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>First of all,I don't recall using the word,Lebanese in =
my last=20
message.The</P>
<P align=3Dleft>word I must have used is Narr,since I know that not all =
the Middle=20
Easterns</P>
<P align=3Dleft>that virtually control the Commercial Life of the Gambia =
come=20
from</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Lebanon.But, of course, we cannot ignore the fact the =
lion's share=20
belongs to</P>
<P align=3Dleft>that country.Then comes the Mauritanians,some=20
Syrians,Palestinians,Egyptians</P>
<P align=3Dleft>etc...</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>The second thing I want to do is to be on the record as =
saying=20
that whenever</P>
<P align=3Dleft>I mention Narr or Lebanese or whatever,that definitely =
cannot and=20
does not include</P>
<P align=3Dleft>those Gambians of Lebanese descent who were born =
brought</P>
<P align=3Dleft>up,educated,socialised in Gambia and have a sense of =
belonging to=20
the</P>
<P align=3Dleft>country,neither me nor anybody anywhere has the =
slightest right to=20
to refer</P>
<P align=3Dleft>to them as anything other than Gambians.They are, in =
short, as=20
Gambian as our National Anthem itself.But since I am perfectly =
comfortable with=20
critically debating about Mali and Malians ,even though my Sarahule =
ancestors=20
originally came from that country,I would assume that my Gambian =
compatriots of=20
Lebanese,Syrian,palestinian or whatever descent are equally comfortable =
with=20
talking about the people who come from those places to work in the =
Gambia.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>The third thing I want to do is to inform you that the =
fact that I=20
belong to</P>
<P align=3Dleft>the list of those Gambians who have abandoned or run =
away from the=20
Gambia or</P>
<P align=3Dleft>whatever you would want to call it cannot and should not =
deny me=20
my right to</P>
<P align=3Dleft>participate and contribute in the fullest possible =
manner to 'the=20
Aliens</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Policy Debate'in my country,anymore than your present =
status as a=20
Norwegian</P>
<P align=3Dleft>doing business in the Gambia should deny you your =
birthright of=20
having</P>
<P align=3Dleft>something to say about what should be done about some of =
the the=20
Gambian</P>
<P align=3Dleft>residents in Norway who consistently abuse the =
generosity of their=20
host</P>
<P align=3Dleft>country.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>So,maybe we can now talk about the Narr problem or the =
Lebanese if=20
that is the word you prefer.For your information,Gambia is not at all =
unique=20
among the black African countries whose commercial life,s Dependency on =
Asian=20
Immigrants has approached infantile proportions.Just name any country =
south of=20
the Sahara from Senegal to the Cape of good Hope,the cahnces are that, =
if that=20
country has anything in it worth selling,the sellers are Asians,mostly =
Lebanese=20
in West Africa and Indians in East and Southern Africa,and the =
buyers,who else,=20
the poor black locals.Several years ago,when Senegal and Mauritania had =
their=20
that infamous border clash and the Lebanese shop owners panicked and =
booked the=20
first flights out of Yoff to Banjul,Freetown,Monrovia,Kinshasha etc. and =
the=20
Mauritanian Shopkeepers too busy avoiding execution from a hysterical =
Senegalese=20
youth,the food supplies for almost all the urban centers of Senegal came =
to an=20
abrupt halt.Only those Senegalese close to the Gambian border were able =
to buy=20
their daily essentials from that country.As unbelievable as the degree =
is to=20
which Senegal's commercial life is held hostage by its Middle Eastern=20
immigrants,that is nothing compared to the devastating economic strenght =
and=20
control of the Indians of the commercial life of the Kenyan =
captial,Nairobi.When=20
I visited that country in the mid eighties,you would have thought =
that,given my=20
bringing up in Sere Kunda,a town in which owning a shop is almost equal =
to being=20
an Asian(Bitiki Narr) -given that kind of culture in me,it should not =
have=20
surprised me at all that in here also,another black African country,the =
people=20
who own and run all the things that are worth running and owning are =
foreigners,=20
the Asian immigrants;but, believe me,there was nothing in my that Sere =
Kunda=20
experience that could have prepared me for the shock I was about to=20
experience.In short,the Gambian situation was a day on the beach =
compared to=20
what I saw in Kenya.I will not make here any mention of the almost =
sureal=20
stiuation that had existed in the pre-Idi Amin era in Uganda ,in which a =
mere 72=20
thousand foreigners,almost all of them Indians, had controlled almost =
eighty=20
percent of the wealth of entire Ugandan Nation.So much for the plight of =
other=20
African countries.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>So,who are Nay sayers on this List kidding,themselves or =
the=20
helpless Gambian masses?And I want to know what they are  trying to =
say=20
here! Are they saying that there are no Narrs in the Gambia that own and =
control=20
the bulk of what is worth owning and controlling in our nation's =
commercial=20
sector;or are they saying that they are there but that they are now all =
citizens=20
of of our country; or are they saying: yes ,they are there,and ,yes, =
they=20
control a disproportionate portion of our commerce but that that is not =
a=20
problem? If their reply is  denying their existence then maybe we =
should do=20
some mass psycho-analysing here.Because maybe then the Psychological =
Mechanism=20
called 'state of denial' is at work here.That is a mechamism that the =
SELF uses=20
to protect itself from the painful consequences of a problem it cannot =
solve or=20
get away from.It does that by denying the very existence of the problem =
bugging=20
it,on the one hand,and convincing itself at the sub-conscious level of =
that=20
'fact',on the other.But if their reply is that they are there, =
alright,but that=20
all of them have acquired Gambian citizenship,I would say to them that I =
am=20
very,very interested to know about that magical process that has made =
getting=20
Gambian citizenship and setting up shops all over the place in the =
Gambia such a=20
breeze!And,finally, if they reply that ,yes,they are there and,yes,they =
are not=20
Gambian citizens,and yes,they are wielding an unacceptable amount of =
power and=20
influence in our land but that, that is not a problem at all,then I =
would like=20
to refer them to at least one Lebanese who thinks otherwise.That person =
is none=20
other than a friend of mine here in Qatar who,when he once visited his =
wealthy=20
cousin in the Gambia, did not fail to notice that there was something=20
fundamentally flawed with the picture he saw down there.His disbelief =
with the=20
surreal situation down there was not connected so much to the incredible =
amount=20
of power and influence of his compatriots in the Gambia,but rather to =
the fact=20
that very few Gambians seem to notice the tragic irony of the =
situation,let=20
alone being bothered by it.My this smart Lebanese friend's honest =
observation is=20
the direct  result of his knowing deep down that there is no =
way,not in one=20
million years,that the smartest Fulla entrepreneur,could achieve in =
Beirut what=20
the dummest Lebanese entrepreneur is capable of achieving within just =
one year=20
after overstaying his visiting visa and setting up a shop and started =
selling=20
stuffs. Gambia,please,wake up!! The Roman historian,Pliny was =
right,there are=20
certain things that can  happen no where else except in =
Africa.Else,where=20
on God's earth could life be so great for migrant workers!</P>
<P align=3Dleft>I am a little bit confused about that mythtical =
commercial and=20
entrepreneurial acumen of the Middle Easterns and its alleged attendant=20
vitality.I am a little bit confused about the kinds of magical selling =
skills=20
that they have demonstrated that the Badibunkas,the Fullas and the =
Sarahulehs=20
cannot have if given the same opportunities.I am a little bit confused =
as to=20
where this so-called  vitality,which would be absent from the =
Gambia in=20
their absence, has made itself felt in the lives of the ordinary =
Gambians.All=20
these are very confusing to me;what is however not confusing to me is =
that=20
Gambia is a tiny little country with a tiny economy much of which is =
controlled=20
by non-Gambians who have,with very isolated exceptions,demonstrated over =
the=20
decades that they are non-integrateable into the main stream Gambian=20
society.Now,that could be a recipe for disaster in the future.The =
situation and=20
the events that  culminated into the 1972 crises in uganda looked=20
dangerously similar to that of Gambia at present.The cliche that says =
that the=20
people who don't learn from the lessons of history are condemned by it =
is as=20
true today as it ever was.There is nothing wrong with making one's =
country's=20
economy liberal and open to outside talent and investment,but only the =
naive=20
would confuse that with giving the keys to the family treasury to=20
foreigners. </P>
<P align=3Dleft>This debate is not about racism,and it is not about =
xenophobia and=20
it is not at the highest  intellectual level even about Lebanon or =
Lebanese=20
or Mauritania or Mauritanians,it is about how not to run a modern state =
like a=20
traditional open village in which anybody could come from anywhere and =
build a=20
hut in anywhere as long as there is an empty space left somewhere =
without much=20
questioning.That is how we are and that is our heritage and there is a =
lot of=20
good in it.But common sense requires that, since others don't don't =
treat us in=20
their places with the kind of unrestrained village generosity that we =
are=20
accustomed to treating their people in our places,maybe we should adjust =
our=20
treatment of their people accordingly.That way ,we would achieve =
reciprocity,be=20
fair to ourselves and maybe even win the respect of the people we deal =
with.</P>
<P align=3Dleft><FONT color=3D#000000=20
size=3D2>          &nbs=
p;            =
;            =
             =

<FONT color=3D#000000>REGARDS BASSSS!</FONT></FONT></P>
<P align=3Dleft><FONT color=3D#000000=20
size=3D2>          &nbs=
p;            =
;            =
             =

</FONT></P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft>-----Original Message-----</P>
<P align=3Dleft>From: <U><FONT color=3D#0000ff>jgr@commit.gm</U></FONT> =
<<U><FONT=20
color=3D#0000ff>gambia-l@commit.gm</U></FONT>></P>
<P align=3Dleft>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing =
List</P>
<P align=3Dleft><<U><FONT=20
color=3D#0000ff>gambia-l@u.washington.edu</U></FONT>></P>
<P align=3Dleft>Date: Saturday, November 08, 1997 11:14 AM</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft>Sent by "Jorn Grotnes" <<U><FONT=20
color=3D#0000ff>jgr@commit.gm</U></FONT>></P>
<P align=3Dleft>via Commit</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft>Bass,</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>If you are willing to continue this discussion, I would =
like to=20
argue</P>
<P align=3Dleft>further;</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>>Well,I think you are wrong,for the simple reason =
that when a=20
group is</P>
<P align=3Dleft>>defined by behavior as opposed to physical =
appearance that is=20
not normally</P>
<P align=3Dleft>>considered as racism or groupism.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>But you have not done that, on the contrary you have =
judged the=20
behaiviour</P>
<P align=3Dleft>of a group (the Lebanese) after the behaviour of some =
members of=20
the group.</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Or are you seriously meaning that ALL memebers of the =
group were=20
behaving in</P>
<P align=3Dleft>this way, and that the reason why you group them is =
their=20
behaviour, rather</P>
<P align=3Dleft>than the fact that they are Lebanese (which is very much =
"how=20
they look")?</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>>Maybe you should,given that you are a little bit new =
in the=20
gambia,ask what</P>
<P align=3Dleft>has</P>
<P align=3Dleft>>to those Gambians who had been engaged in such =
practices=20
during</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>Why don't you enlighten me if you think it will help me =
to=20
understand the</P>
<P align=3Dleft>need to exclude Lebanese from Gambian business?</P>
<P align=3Dleft>The fact that I have been in the Gambia for such a short =
period=20
should not</P>
<P align=3Dleft>matter, let's instead pretend I am completely ignorant =
of matters=20
Gambian</P>
<P align=3Dleft>(not far from the truth).</P>
<P align=3Dleft>It seems to me that a lot of Gambians that abandoned =
their country=20
in hard</P>
<P align=3Dleft>times (something I do not condemn, like you seem to do) =
might be=20
on this</P>
<P align=3Dleft>very list.</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Should they not be allowed to return to their own =
country if they=20
wish? (I</P>
<P align=3Dleft>must assume that, since they are to be "even =
stricter=20
judged" than the</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Lebanese?)</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>Please take note that I am talking principles here, =
since my=20
factual</P>
<P align=3Dleft>knowledge is extremely limited.</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>Best regards</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft>Jorn</P>
<P align=3Dleft>Commit</P>
<P align=3Dleft>The Gambia</P>
<P align=3Dleft></P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P>
<P align=3Dleft> </P><B><FONT face=3D"Times New Roman (Arabic)" =
size=3D6>
<P align=3Dleft> </P></B></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

------=_NextPart_000_0004_01BCEE23.F14617E0--


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 14:29:19 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
Message-ID: <9711101929.AA35208@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Let's face it, English is a crazy language. There is no egg in
eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France.

Sweetmeats are candies, while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are
meat.

We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that
quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square, and a guinea pig is
neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write, but fingers don't fing, grocers
don't groce, and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth,
why isn't the plural of booth beeth? One goose, two geese -- one
moose, two meese? And one index, two indices?

Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend, that you
comb through annals of history but not through a single annal? If you
have a collection of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them,
what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why don't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats
vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? If you wrote a letter, did you
bote your tongue?

Sometimes I think all English speakers should be committed to an asylum
for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and
play at a recital; ship by truck, and send cargo by ship; have noses that
run and feet that smell; park on driveways and drive on parkways?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and
wise guy are opposites? How can overlook and oversee be opposites, while
quite a lot and quite a few are alike? How can the weather be hot as hell
one day and cold as hell another?

Have you noticed that we talk about certain things only when they are
absent? Have you ever seen a horseful carriage or a strapful gown? Met a
sung hero or experienced requited love? Have you ever run into someone
who was gruntled, ruly or peccable? And where are all those people who
ARE spring chickens or who WOULD hurt a fly?

You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house
can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it
out, and in which an alarm clock goes on by going off.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the
creativity of the human race (which, of course, isn't a race at all).

That is why, when the stars are out they are visible, but when the lights
are out they are invisible. And why, when I wind up my watch, I start it,
but when I wind up this essay, I end it.

-----------------------------------------------------

Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 17:00:23 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: How Smart Are You?
Message-ID: <9711102200.AA37318@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hello to all the TEASER "How Smart ARE You" respondents,

Some people have requested that I send them the results of the 'mini
survey'. Rather than send out 35 individual responses, I have decided to
post it to the List. After receiving 35 responses, here are the final
results from those individuals.

Please, don't feel bad if you counted 3F'S. Most people counted 3F'S just
like you. Hmmm, Does this tell you anything? The only two individuals who
scored a perfect count were someone from NASA and a Physics Prof. at some
university (note: this is according to the information received).

Here is a break down of the responses:

0F 1F 2F 3F 4F 5F 6F Total
=============================================================
1 0 0 22 7 3 2 35

Thank you for the responses.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 18:13:19 -0500 (EST)
From: "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Hello
Message-ID: <199711102313.SAA17339@postbox.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Michael:

I just finished reading your message but noticed that you did managed to get
your message about changing your e-mail address to gambia-l.. i'm glad it
worked out.

On another note, we'll be driving into Cleveland. It's only about a 2.5 hour
drive. I'm not sure yet whether we plan to spend the night or drive back
the same day. Once I talk to my sister, we'll let you know. Thanks for
offering though. Your hospitality is very much appreciated.

I surfed the net thinking I could pick up something on the conference that's
coming up. apparently it's called the 'annual conference of the african
studies association' by the Department of african american and african
studies. the phone number is 614/292-3700. the webpage is at
Http://aaas.ohio-state.edu. there is not much about the conference here
except the date and venue. i would suggest that you call the number above
and ask that they fax you a copy of the registration packet or send it by
e-mail if they have it. I hear that it is very well organized and that there
are a lot of interesting sessions going on. i will try to get a hold of a
hard copy but it might be too late to send it to you. i did inquire about an
electronic version on Gambia-l and one Ebrima Sall said that he will try to
send it to me. if i get it, I will forward it to you. good luck let me know
if you plan to come down. I know for a fact that at the end of the
conference on the 15th, the OSU african students assoc. is hosting a
cultural evening of dances, fashion show, story telling..., it should be
fun. talk to you later.

N'Dey Marie

At 10:34 AM 11/9/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Listmember, please subscribe Abdoulie S. Jallow. His e-mail address is
>B6L6@MUSICB.MCGILL.CA
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 18:19:31 -0500 (EST)
From: "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: sorry ... personal message mistakenly sent
Message-ID: <199711102319.SAA21460@postbox.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Gambia-l:
Oops! i just sent a personal message to gambia-l that was meant for a
friend. sorry... i hit the send message button before realizing that the
reply address was to gambia-l.
N'Deye Marie


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 17:36:37 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: Daddy Njie <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Reparations for the injustices of slavery
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971110172225.1469A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi folks,
I was just wondering what you guys think about slavery and the
idea of reparations. Should Africans and Africans leaving in the diaspora
be compensated for slavery and also should the west return stolen
artifacts and treasure back to Africa.

Si jama
Daddy Njie.

Walk softly and carry a megawatt laser.



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 18:48:43 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: ASA Meeting, Columbus, Ohio
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.971110184332.27012A-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Habib,

Thanks for the information. I do not know how far Cleveland is from
Columbus, but it would be nice to see Daddy Sang, somehow. I will email
him and see if we can work out a way of seeing each other.

Best,

Ebrima.

On Fri, 7 Nov
1997, Habib Ghanim wrote:

> Ebrima Sall wrote:
> >
> > Hi Folks,
> >
> > Will any Gambia-lers be in Columbus, Ohio, for the
> > upcoming annual jamburee of the African Studies Association (13-16
> > November; venue: Hyatt Regency and environs).
> >
> > I will be there, and it would be great to see some of you there. I hope,
> > Amadou, you will be going too...
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Ebrima Sall.I think Daddy Sang is in Cleveland, Oh . Is that close enough??
>





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 19:20:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Africa in the fast-globalizing world economy
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.971110191728.27012C-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Sorry folks. That was a slip! I mean, the private message that I wanted to
send to Cliff Friday (with the above subject heading), which found its way
to the bantaba. I am sorry about that.

Ebrima Sall.


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 22:42:45 -0500
From: LAMIN CEESAY <ceesay@bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <3467D435.3278@bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

This is Irie Ceesay speaking up finally. I think Patricia Conjoh
Nortfleet should be President.

I have never agreed with anyone more than she. You can barely find
African women who will tell it like
it is, as Patricia has done.

I'm African-American, but married to a REAL, AUTHENTIC, BONA FIDE
African from The Gambia and I'm learning
that all Patricia has said is SO-O-O-O true.

I love my husband beyond all means, but I'm truly learning the plight of
the African Woman (wife).
I don't think I could survive the fate of the African woman (wife)
living in Africa today. I suppose
you would have to be born and bred in Africa to be truly satisfied with
the lifestyle.

I went to an African gathering recently and just as Patricia said, all
the women were in the kitchen, cooking and chatting about, while all the
men were in the living room, chatting about and sitting in chairs while
the women were standing.

While I was most appalled, I just took it in stride and acted
accordingly, "I went in the living room and sat in an unoccupied
chair." My husband did not attend the gathering with me, but if he had,
he would have given me the eye to go and chat with the ladies.

I just don't know if I'll ever get use to this aspect of the new culture
that I've embarked upon.
My husband and I have come to the agreement that we'll each have to
accept parts of each other's culture and just continue loving each
other.

Well, Momodou, you asked why hadn't the list heard from me, well, now
you've awakened the dead. You chose the right subject to bring me back
to life. Patricia you get my vote for President, of America, The
Gambia and Sierre Leone.


Irie (bye for now).

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 13:05:07 +0100
From: Per Grotnes <perg@nfh.uit.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19971111130507.006a2cb4@draugen.nfh.uit.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Buharry.
At 16:28 09.11.97 -0800, you wrote among other things:


".......in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one has to
be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually responsible
and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulated
for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship."

Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, there
have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the above
statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, give
me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must allow
dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another country.
I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Correct me
if I am wrong, anyone.

perG


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 06:52:55 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp1.erols.com
Subject: Re: ASA Meeting, Columbus, Ohio
Message-ID: <34687147.69D0@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ebrima Sall wrote:
>
> Habib,
>
> Thanks for the information. I do not know how far Cleveland is from
> Columbus, but it would be nice to see Daddy Sang, somehow. I will email
> him and see if we can work out a way of seeing each other.
>
> Best,
>
> Ebrima.
>
> On Fri, 7 Nov
> 1997, Habib Ghanim wrote:
>
> > Ebrima Sall wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi Folks,
> > >
> > > Will any Gambia-lers be in Columbus, Ohio, for the
> > > upcoming annual jamburee of the African Studies Association (13-16
> > > November; venue: Hyatt Regency and environs).
> > >
> > > I will be there, and it would be great to see some of you there. I hope,
> > > Amadou, you will be going too...
> > >
> > > Best,
> > >
> > > Ebrima Sall.I think Daddy Sang is in Cleveland, Oh . Is that close enough??
> >
>
> Ebrima
I spoke to Sang Ndow and he indicated he might go if he gets more
information. He will be a good participant because like me he has been
around for over twenty five years in USA.
Good luck and keep in touch
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 09:23:06 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD46@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"

This could be an opened can of worms but then again may not be.

If because you are an African woman, you cannot be a FEMINIST, then as
African women we CANNOT be anything. As an African woman, I CAN be
anything I want to be but I also know what my position, possibilities
and my responsibilities are in my society. Sister Conjoh will have to
let us know what being AN AFRICAN WOMAN means to her and since this is
not clear in her posting, I can only surmise what she meant from her
example -

that it really is not feasible for the African woman to espouse the
feminist doctrine, perhaps because of the consequences of such a stance
in our society or that African women have no need to because we are and
have always been the sustainers of structures that make the society what
it is.

> >
> > Is the african woman equal to the african man socially?
>
>
If everything was meant to be equal, one of us will be of no
consequence, I think.

> Why this arrangement? Because male education is more
> > valued than female education. At the end of the day, are these
> children
> > all equal socially?
>
A rhetorical question - these children are being socialized
differently. As girls growing up, our mothers taught us the practical
aspects of living and encouraged us to learn whatever else there is to
learn and this in itself empowered us to take responsibility for self
and ours. Now, - had the family been able to send all five kids to
school and the farm work and housework still needed to be done, will
the girls be made to do both or will the girls go the kitchen and the
boys to farm?


> > This "big talk" is usully politics or other affairs of the State
> that
> > women are left out of. Is this equality?
I will wager that the men do not know much about how the household is
run and how their kids are developing mentally or socially

> The boys are educated and the girls are not.
>
Says who - leave the boys in the kitchen for a week and they will not be
able to boil water.

> Politically who is more in tune with the affairs of the > country?
> When the boys vote, they fully (hopefully) understand the issues on
> which they vote, unlike their sisters who are probably apolitical. Is
> this equality?
>
The only issues that our politicians run on are those that would keep
them in power. Sisters may be uneducated about the issues because they
are never made clear by those running but apolitical would be
stretching.
> >
> > Economically, is the african woman equal to the african man? The
> > traditional role of the woman in Africa is child rearing.
>
This may be the perception of many, but is it the reality? If all the
women in Africa engaged in business were to disengage and wait for the
man to fend for the whole family, famine of unimaginable proportion will
ensue, let's not try it.

> >
> > Who controls the money machinary in Africa? Who sets the agenda for
> > different developmental programs? Who controls our mineral and
> natural
> > resources? Is that economic equality?
???????
>
> There is no room to demand social equality, political equality or
> economic equality.
>
There is room to demand whatever - it is a choice with consequences and
a very personal one at that

> Do I want to be feminist? NO!!!!!!!!!! Because then I would be
> very different.
>
How would you be different. I am sure you are a HUMANIST which to me
means more than being a FEMINIST.
> To answer your
> > question, the disclaimer is to let you to know that I am not
> different - I
> > am an African woman.
>
Like you, I am an African woman who does not demand but works for
equality which could be attained by everyone treating the other as they
would want to be treated (Idealistic?)
> >
> > JUST A THOUGHT:
> > African men have governed our world from time in memorial, and look
> at the
> > mess we are in ------- maybe the women should be given a chance to
> govern
> > so can compare the difference
>
I agree. I think we will be better at it.

> ( Note: I am not a politician ).
>
I am afraid you cannot escape being a politician - it is inherently
human
>
> >
> > Conjoh.
>
>
In peace

Soffie Ceesay

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 07:46:39 PST
From: "alieu badara" <alieu@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: SUBSCRIBE
Message-ID: <19971111154639.21520.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

HELLO!
Could you subscribe Edi Sidibeh in the bantaba.
His email address is lha7edsi@kyamk.fi

Bye,Alieu


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 10:49:52 -0500 (EST)
From: EStew68064@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Dr. Gamble...info request
Message-ID: <971111104952_-1340717410@mrin44.mail.aol.com>


In a message dated 11/8/97 12:59:48 PM, you wrote:

<<Dear Gambia L Folks:

Dr. Gamble asked me if anyone knows the answers to the following questions:

1. There is an old custom in The GAmbia of someone giving a small present in
the hope of getting a present of greater value in return. Is there any word
in Gambian languages, including Creole, for this procedure?

2. Does anybody know the names of the old landing places on the South bank
opposite Karantaba?

3. Has anybody ever heard of the following places which travellers mentioned
in earlier centuries...Pompetory, Jerekunde, Bereck or Pereck, Oranto,
Massamacoadum, Ponor, Jalacuna. And where are they?

Any answers would be appreciated.

Baraka - Liz Stewart Fatty

>>



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 09:53:37 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>,
Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
Cc: Kimberly McCord 001 <kmccord@RBVDNR.com>,
"Elaine E. Richards" <erichard@RBVDNR.com>,
Subject: RE: Reparations for the injustices of slavery
Message-ID: <199711111554.HAA12239@mx5.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
boundary="---- =_NextPart_000_01BCEE87.D66AF260"

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------ =_NextPart_000_01BCEE87.D66AF260
Content-Type: text/plain

Greetings Everyone. My name is Keretha Cash and I am a new member to
GAMBIA-L. I reside in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and pay my bills working as
a secretary. My connection to The Gambia is through friends and my
fiance, who is from Banjul.

On the issue at hand, I think the physical slavery is minimal today but
the mental slavery is rampant. Reparations would be wonderful but it
would be idealistic. Compensation in the form of equal opportunity for
jobs, housing, etc.... is a more realistic goal. When we take advantage
of the opportunities, we can have more control over our lives and the
goals of our people as a whole -- Africans and the African Diaspora --
and WORKING TOGETHER we will change the world. Although too many chefs
and not enough cooks spoil the broth.

As far as returning stolen goods, there is no question, no discussion
needed here. If it is taken without permission and compensation, if it
is TAKEN, it MUST needs be returned. In my mind, the colonialists have
stolen so much and tried to wipe out the contributions of Africa to the
world so that the descendents and the diaspora (us) have to search hard
to find the positive in being from the continent of Africa.

Thank you for listening. I look forward to other responses. Peace.

> ----------
> From: Nyang Njie[SMTP:st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu]
> Sent: Monday, November 10, 1997 5:36 PM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Reparations for the injustices of slavery
>
> Hi folks,
> I was just wondering what you guys think about slavery and the
> idea of reparations. Should Africans and Africans leaving in the
> diaspora
> be compensated for slavery and also should the west return stolen
> artifacts and treasure back to Africa.
>
> Si jama
> Daddy Njie.
>
> Walk softly and carry a megawatt laser.
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 09:55:49 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <199711111557.JAA10090@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi folks,

i've subscribed Alieu Jobe to Gambia-L and asked him to kindly send in a
self-introduction as soon as he can. join me in welcoming him to our
midst, and wish him a pleasant stay, and fruitful dialogue.

have a great day!

Katim


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 20:35:46 +0300
From: "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <01bceec8$3e7d4c00$5d2385c2@kolls567>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

That was great thinking,Soffie! Thanks and keep up the good work down there!

Regards Bassss!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: 11/ÑÌÈ/1418 11:30 ã
Subject: RE: Are some African women feminists?


>This could be an opened can of worms but then again may not be.
>
>If because you are an African woman, you cannot be a FEMINIST, then as
>African women we CANNOT be anything. As an African woman, I CAN be
>anything I want to be but I also know what my position, possibilities
>and my responsibilities are in my society. Sister Conjoh will have to
>let us know what being AN AFRICAN WOMAN means to her and since this is
>not clear in her posting, I can only surmise what she meant from her
>example -
>
>that it really is not feasible for the African woman to espouse the
>feminist doctrine, perhaps because of the consequences of such a stance
>in our society or that African women have no need to because we are and
>have always been the sustainers of structures that make the society what
>it is.
>
>> >
>> > Is the african woman equal to the african man socially?
>>
>>
>If everything was meant to be equal, one of us will be of no
>consequence, I think.
>
>> Why this arrangement? Because male education is more
>> > valued than female education. At the end of the day, are these
>> children
>> > all equal socially?
>>
> A rhetorical question - these children are being socialized
>differently. As girls growing up, our mothers taught us the practical
>aspects of living and encouraged us to learn whatever else there is to
>learn and this in itself empowered us to take responsibility for self
>and ours. Now, - had the family been able to send all five kids to
>school and the farm work and housework still needed to be done, will
>the girls be made to do both or will the girls go the kitchen and the
>boys to farm?
>
>
>> > This "big talk" is usully politics or other affairs of the State
>> that
>> > women are left out of. Is this equality?
>I will wager that the men do not know much about how the household is
>run and how their kids are developing mentally or socially
>
>> The boys are educated and the girls are not.
>>
>Says who - leave the boys in the kitchen for a week and they will not be
>able to boil water.
>
>> Politically who is more in tune with the affairs of the > country?
>> When the boys vote, they fully (hopefully) understand the issues on
>> which they vote, unlike their sisters who are probably apolitical. Is
>> this equality?
>>
>The only issues that our politicians run on are those that would keep
>them in power. Sisters may be uneducated about the issues because they
>are never made clear by those running but apolitical would be
>stretching.
>> >
>> > Economically, is the african woman equal to the african man? The
>> > traditional role of the woman in Africa is child rearing.
>>
>This may be the perception of many, but is it the reality? If all the
>women in Africa engaged in business were to disengage and wait for the
>man to fend for the whole family, famine of unimaginable proportion will
>ensue, let's not try it.
>
>> >
>> > Who controls the money machinary in Africa? Who sets the agenda for
>> > different developmental programs? Who controls our mineral and
>> natural
>> > resources? Is that economic equality?
>???????
>>
>> There is no room to demand social equality, political equality or
>> economic equality.
>>
>There is room to demand whatever - it is a choice with consequences and
>a very personal one at that
>
>> Do I want to be feminist? NO!!!!!!!!!! Because then I would be
>> very different.
>>
>How would you be different. I am sure you are a HUMANIST which to me
>means more than being a FEMINIST.
>> To answer your
>> > question, the disclaimer is to let you to know that I am not
>> different - I
>> > am an African woman.
>>
>Like you, I am an African woman who does not demand but works for
>equality which could be attained by everyone treating the other as they
>would want to be treated (Idealistic?)
>> >
>> > JUST A THOUGHT:
>> > African men have governed our world from time in memorial, and look
>> at the
>> > mess we are in ------- maybe the women should be given a chance to
>> govern
>> > so can compare the difference
>>
>I agree. I think we will be better at it.
>
>> ( Note: I am not a politician ).
>>
>I am afraid you cannot escape being a politician - it is inherently
>human
>>
>> >
>> > Conjoh.
>>
>>
>In peace
>
>Soffie Ceesay
>


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 13:22:57 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <3468A280.7489@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ceesay Soffie wrote:
>
> This could be an opened can of worms but then again may not be.
>
> If because you are an African woman, you cannot be a FEMINIST, then as
> African women we CANNOT be anything. As an African woman, I CAN be
> anything I want to be but I also know what my position, possibilities
> and my responsibilities are in my society. Sister Conjoh will have to
> let us know what being AN AFRICAN WOMAN means to her and since this is
> not clear in her posting, I can only surmise what she meant from her
> example -
>
> that it really is not feasible for the African woman to espouse the
> feminist doctrine, perhaps because of the consequences of such a stance
> in our society or that African women have no need to because we are and
> have always been the sustainers of structures that make the society what
> it is.
>
> > >
> > > Is the african woman equal to the african man socially?
> >
> >
> If everything was meant to be equal, one of us will be of no
> consequence, I think.
>
> > Why this arrangement? Because male education is more
> > > valued than female education. At the end of the day, are these
> > children
> > > all equal socially?
> >
> A rhetorical question - these children are being socialized
> differently. As girls growing up, our mothers taught us the practical
> aspects of living and encouraged us to learn whatever else there is to
> learn and this in itself empowered us to take responsibility for self
> and ours. Now, - had the family been able to send all five kids to
> school and the farm work and housework still needed to be done, will
> the girls be made to do both or will the girls go the kitchen and the
> boys to farm?
>
> > > This "big talk" is usully politics or other affairs of the State
> > that
> > > women are left out of. Is this equality?
> I will wager that the men do not know much about how the household is
> run and how their kids are developing mentally or socially
>
> > The boys are educated and the girls are not.
> >
> Says who - leave the boys in the kitchen for a week and they will not be
> able to boil water.
>
> > Politically who is more in tune with the affairs of the > country?
> > When the boys vote, they fully (hopefully) understand the issues on
> > which they vote, unlike their sisters who are probably apolitical. Is
> > this equality?
> >
> The only issues that our politicians run on are those that would keep
> them in power. Sisters may be uneducated about the issues because they
> are never made clear by those running but apolitical would be
> stretching.
> > >
> > > Economically, is the african woman equal to the african man? The
> > > traditional role of the woman in Africa is child rearing.
> >
> This may be the perception of many, but is it the reality? If all the
> women in Africa engaged in business were to disengage and wait for the
> man to fend for the whole family, famine of unimaginable proportion will
> ensue, let's not try it.
>
> > >
> > > Who controls the money machinary in Africa? Who sets the agenda for
> > > different developmental programs? Who controls our mineral and
> > natural
> > > resources? Is that economic equality?
> ???????
> >
> > There is no room to demand social equality, political equality or
> > economic equality.
> >
> There is room to demand whatever - it is a choice with consequences and
> a very personal one at that
>
> > Do I want to be feminist? NO!!!!!!!!!! Because then I would be
> > very different.
> >
> How would you be different. I am sure you are a HUMANIST which to me
> means more than being a FEMINIST.
> > To answer your
> > > question, the disclaimer is to let you to know that I am not
> > different - I
> > > am an African woman.
> >
> Like you, I am an African woman who does not demand but works for
> equality which could be attained by everyone treating the other as they
> would want to be treated (Idealistic?)
> > >
> > > JUST A THOUGHT:
> > > African men have governed our world from time in memorial, and look
> > at the
> > > mess we are in ------- maybe the women should be given a chance to
> > govern
> > > so can compare the difference
> >
> I agree. I think we will be better at it.
>
> > ( Note: I am not a politician ).
> >
> I am afraid you cannot escape being a politician - it is inherently
> human
> >
> > >
> > > Conjoh.
> >
> >
> In peace
>
> Soffie Ceesay

Soffie
It was a real pleasure meeting you recently at The Muslim Community
Center. I agree you are not a feminist nor should you condone feminism
because it is the new tool of the west to divide and rule ( believe me
-it is a fact).
Secondly we have to accept the fact that men and women are equal -no
question. So because we as men get more salary for the same education
does not justfy the idea that a man's education is worth more than a
woman. Traditionally a man should get more income due the the fact that
he is the primary bread weaner of the family in almost most cases
especially back home.( it is his responsibility to feed ,educate and
house his family-wife and children-)
The reality is that a man cannot conceive a chid no matter how hard he
tries and does not have the extra powers Allah gave them (like breast
feeding, menstruation ,child birth and love for their siblings)
Therefore she has assumed certain positions in the family that only she
can do well-there are exceptions of course-( some men are also good at
this -do not get me wrong)
I will finally get to the religious part but I have to attend a meeting
in a few minuites so we will continue maybe tomorrow.
Peace
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 13:51:55 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
Message-ID: <971111135155_1536086799@mrin53.mail.aol.com>

Liz,
The one occasion l can think of, where one gives a small present in return
for a bigger one is in something the Wollof do called "rotal" Literally
translated, this mean drawing water for someone( as in out of a well) An
individual would do this for their uncle's children, usually on a festive
occasion like the end of Ramadan etc. You are jokingly referred to as their
"slave" and they in turn are supposed to give you something, which can be
money, clothes etc. When this so called "master" is getting married or having
a naming ceremony for a child, you "toppa Njam" i.e you go to the
celebration and assist with any chores etc. in anticipation of being given
something in return. These cross cousins have a relationship where they
constantly tease each other but it is all done affectionately. Perhaps
others have more to add, or can give a better explanation and meaning of
these gestures.

Jabou Joh.



In a message dated 11/11/97 10:51:00 AM, you wrote:

<<
In a message dated 11/8/97 12:59:48 PM, you wrote:

<<Dear Gambia L Folks:

Dr. Gamble asked me if anyone knows the answers to the following questions:

1. There is an old custom in The GAmbia of someone giving a small present in
the hope of getting a present of greater value in return. Is there any word
in Gambian languages, including Creole, for this procedure?

2. Does anybody know the names of the old landing places on the South bank
opposite Karantaba?

3. Has anybody ever heard of the following places which travellers mentioned
in earlier centuries...Pompetory, Jerekunde, Bereck or Pereck, Oranto,
Massamacoadum, Ponor, Jalacuna. And where are they?

Any answers would be appreciated.

Baraka - Liz Stewart Fatty

>>




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>>



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 14:18:59 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <9711111919.AA52300@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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"FIND THE GOOD IN EVERY PERSON; WHEN YOU DO, LET THEM KNOW"

-Anon


Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 14:31:35 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Humor: Is this your kind of guy?
Message-ID: <9711111931.AA64598@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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Sorry folks, no offense intended.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

There is a man who has three girlfriends, but he does not know which one
to marry. So he decides to give each one $5000 and see how each of them
spends it.

The first one goes out and gets a total makeover with the money. She gets
new clothes, a new hairdo, manicure, pedicure, the works, and tells the
man, "I spent the money so I could look pretty for you because I love you
so much."

The second one went out and bought new golf clubs, a CD player, a
television, and a stereo and gives them to the man. She says, "I bought
these gifts for you with the money because I love you so much."

The third one takes the $5000 and invests it in the stock market, doubles
her investment, returns the $5000 to the man and reinvests the rest. She
says, "I am investing the rest of the money for our future because I love
you so much."

The man thought long and hard about how each of the women spent the money,
and decided to marry the one with the biggest breasts.

------------------------

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: 11 Nov 1997 17:38:29 +0100
From: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu (Receipt notification requested)
Cc: GAMBIA-L <x400@NORAD.telemax.no> (Receipt notification requested)
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <post.ut34688c7b*/c=NO/admd=Telemax/prmd=Norad/o=Oslo/s=Ceesay/g=Ba-Musa/@MHS>
Content-Identifier: post.ut34688c7b
Content-Return: Prohibited

Per G. wrote:

Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, there
have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the above
statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, give
me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must allow
dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another country.
I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Correct
me
if I am wrong, anyone.

= I think you wrong,

As a Gambian citizen working for NORAD I cannot get a job at one of our
stations outside Norway because I`m not norwegian. There are even some
cleaning jobs in certain government offices where only norwegians citizens
are employed.
But it is true that under Norwegian law you are not permitted to have
citizenship in two countries. A Norwegian national who has applied for and
been granted citizenship in another country automatically loses his/her
Norwegian citizenship. The same is true of the reverse case: a foreign
national who wishes to acquire Norwegian citizenship will be required to
give up his/her former citizen.

But in certain case, the legislation permits you to hold citizenship in
more than one country.

Cases such as:

: If you acquired dual citizenship at birth because you have inherited two
different nationalities from your parents.

: If you were born of Norwegian parents in a country where citizenship is
based on territorial principle.

: If you have applied for a norwegian citizenship and it is not possible
for you to be released from your original citizen.

The last case might work for Gambians if Provision 13(4) in the draft
constitution of the Gambia was adopted in the constitution of the second
republic. Or what???

Regards
Ba-Musa Ceesay




------------------------------

Date: 11 Nov 1997 17:51:23 +0100
From: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
To: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no> (Receipt notification requested)
Cc: gambia-l@u.washington.edu (Receipt notification requested)
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <post.ut34688f4c*/c=NO/admd=Telemax/prmd=Norad/o=Oslo/s=Ceesay/g=Ba-Musa/@MHS>
Content-Identifier: post.ut34688f4c
Content-Return: Prohibited

Svar til melding fra 13:36 tirsdag 11. november 1997
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Per G. wrote:

Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, there
have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the above
statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, give
me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must allow
dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another country.
I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Correct
me
if I am wrong, anyone.

= I think you wrong,

As a Gambian citizen working for NORAD I cannot get a job at one of our
stations outside Norway because I`m not norwegian. There are even some
cleaning jobs in certain government offices where only norwegians citizens
are employed.
But it is true that under Norwegian law you are not permitted to have
citizenship in two countries. A Norwegian national who has applied for and
been granted citizenship in another country automatically loses his/her
Norwegian citizenship. The same is true of the reverse case: a foreign
national who wishes to acquire Norwegian citizenship will be required to
give up his/her former citizen.

But in certain case, the legislation permits you to hold citizenship in
more than one country.

Cases such as:

: If you acquired dual citizenship at birth because you have inherited two
different nationalities from your parents.

: If you were born of Norwegian parents in a country where citizenship is
based on territorial principle.

: If you have applied for a norwegian citizenship and it is not possible
for you to be released from your original citizen.

The last case might work for Gambians if Provision 13(4) in the draft
constitution of the Gambia was adopted in the constitution of the second
republic. Or what???

Regards
Ba-Musa Ceesay




------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 13:23:46 PST
From: "NJAGA JAGNE" <jagnen25@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
Message-ID: <19971111212350.25492.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain


>Let's face it, English is a crazy language. There is no egg in
>eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
>English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France.
.............
>...........................is why, when the stars are out they are
visible, but when the lights >are out they are invisible. And why,
when I wind up my watch, I start it, >but when I wind up this essay, I
end it.
>
Moe S. Jallow
*********************************************************************

MOE,
you are just amazing. i would dearly love to meet you
one day and just attach a face to this wondrous humorous
character who continually brightens my days with his postings on
this bantaba.
for the second straight day, you have made me laught
out loud from my guts like an ***** (the way people here
look at me when i do). you have made me lighten up with new
energy at the end of my classes when i am just about to drop
out of sheer exhaustion. i was so amused by your "how smart
are u" that i called some of my fellow students to share it
with them. you just have that special touch. whatever it was
that that "smart" stuff measures, i apparently don't have enough
of it. i only saw 3 f's and had a tougher time finding the
6th f even after i read the answer. whatever it was that you
had a purpose for these postings, i have found a special
purpose for it. it makes me smile just thinking about them
the whole day.
keep it up bro moe, if this list does nothing else, it
helps me get on with my days much better.
untill i can log on again, this is a verrrry
light-hearted ...........NNNJJJJAAAAGGGGAAAAA

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 16:20:17 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <9711112120.AA56336@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Soffie Ceesay, you wrote:

> If because you are an African woman, you cannot be a FEMINIST, then as
> African women we CANNOT be anything. As an African woman, I CAN be
> anything I want to be but I also know what my position, possibilities
> and my responsibilities are in my society. Sister Conjoh will have to
> let us know what being AN AFRICAN WOMAN means to her and since this is
> not clear in her posting, I can only surmise what she meant from her
> example -

Greetings Ya Soffie,

Since I am pressed for time, I will take a brief moment to comment on your
'well put' response.

In my response to a friend's private message earlier (on this subject), I
noted that I respected Ms. Conjoh's conception of the absence of gender
equality and I think she gave some very good arguments. However, what I
confused me was her idea that feminism is unattainable by the AFRICAN
WOMAN. If this is so, then there is no need for women (with the same
believe as hers) to address issues that affect women. Instead, they should
just accept their fate and continue to be the breasts of burden of
society. Her outspokeness is very scare among the African women which is
why I think she cannot escape from the reality that, just as she has
demonstrated, a FEMINIST will always fight for the attainment of gender
quality and equity in society. By suggesting that women should come
together and address issues that affect their lives, she is outrightly
engaging in FEMINIST struggles. I wonder why she refuses to see that.


> > Do I want to be feminist? NO!!!!!!!!!! Because then I would be
> > very different.
> >
> How would you be different. I am sure you are a HUMANIST which to me
> means more than being a FEMINIST.

>From your response above, It sounds as though you do not also believe in
FEMINISM.
Do you agree with brother Habib's (let me indulge him :-)))) statement:

"I agree you are not a feminist nor should you
condone feminism because it is the new tool of
the west to divide and rule ( believe me -it is a fact)."

Do you really believe this is a "new tool of the west"?. Please, kindly
comment on this, if possible.

Just because there is no equivalent word for FEMINISM in most African
languages does not negate the struggle for gender equality. IMO the
non-existence of an appropriate word for FEMINISM can be attributed
(crudely) to the dominance of patriarchy. Won't you agree that language,
like many other things, is shaped and influenced by the dominant group in
a society?

I got to run....more later.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------





------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 13:30:58 -0800 (PST)
From: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SUBSCRIBE
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.96a.971111132253.19648B-100000@dante20.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

It's my bad. I asked the List managers to subscribe my friend,
Joseph Jassey, and they did. But I gave them a wrong email address and so
it did not go thru. Could you please subscribe him again using the
following address: jjassey@MCIONE.com
Thanx, dawda.


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 16:47:37 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: ASA--Hello
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.971111164226.22232A-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Ndeye Marie,

The ASA home page is at:

www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/ASA_Menu.html

and the e-mail address is: africa@emory.edu

Good luck.

Ebrima


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 15:52:05 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>,
gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <199711112153.NAA00373@mx2.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------ =_NextPart_000_01BCEEB9.F82CFE70
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charset="iso-8859-1"

I am responding to part of Soffie's email:

>From an African American perspective, I venture that the African woman
is definitely a humanist which is my view is a higher perspective than
just being a feminist. The definition of feminist may vary somewhat but
I also believe many are feminists. Does the definition of feminism mean
pro-female and therefore anti-male? There are many ways to express
feminism -- some upfront and some behind the scenes. Maybe it's how the
formula is expressed: in the work force, on the home front, socially,
etc... Do you protest loudly and directly or indirectly and through
others (your children, family members, etc...)?

>From my conversations with some Gambians, women are very active in
society and politics albeit behind the scenes. Some men discuss things
with their wives before taking a position and thus, the woman has some
input. Does that mean that the woman is not active? What is your view
on this?

I also wonder if equality should always be expressed in terms of 50/50
or does it vary according to situations, relationships, talents, skills,
etc...? I do think that even if people believe themselves to be of no
consequence, they are but have handed over their power. During the
apartheid regime, many women took to the streets beside and in spite of
the men. Yes it was for the nation but I would consider this to be a
feminist action.

The new generation, due to the globalization of information
distribution, will have a different view on this issue I am sure.

Keretha
> ----------
> From: Ceesay Soffie[SMTP:Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 1997 8:23 AM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: RE: Are some African women feminists?
>
> This could be an opened can of worms but then again may not be.
>
> If because you are an African woman, you cannot be a FEMINIST, then as
> African women we CANNOT be anything. As an African woman, I CAN be
> anything I want to be but I also know what my position, possibilities
> and my responsibilities are in my society. Sister Conjoh will have to
> let us know what being AN AFRICAN WOMAN means to her and since this is
> not clear in her posting, I can only surmise what she meant from her
> example -
>
> that it really is not feasible for the African woman to espouse the
> feminist doctrine, perhaps because of the consequences of such a
> stance
> in our society or that African women have no need to because we are
> and
> have always been the sustainers of structures that make the society
> what
> it is.
>
> > >
> > > Is the african woman equal to the african man socially?
> >
> >
> If everything was meant to be equal, one of us will be of no
> consequence, I think.
>
> > Why this arrangement? Because male education is more
> > > valued than female education. At the end of the day, are these
> > children all equal socially?
> >
> A rhetorical question - these children are being socialized
> differently. As girls growing up, our mothers taught us the practical
> aspects of living and encouraged us to learn whatever else there is to
> learn and this in itself empowered us to take responsibility for self
> and ours. Now, - had the family been able to send all five kids to
> school and the farm work and housework still needed to be done, will
> the girls be made to do both or will the girls go the kitchen and the
> boys to farm?
>
>
> > > This "big talk" is usully politics or other affairs of the State
> > that women are left out of. Is this equality? I will wager that the
> men do not know much about how the household is run and how their kids
> are developing mentally or socially
>
> > The boys are educated and the girls are not.
> >
> Says who - leave the boys in the kitchen for a week and they will not
> be
> able to boil water.
>
> > Politically who is more in tune with the affairs of the > country?
> > When the boys vote, they fully (hopefully) understand the issues on
> > which they vote, unlike their sisters who are probably apolitical.
> Is
> > this equality?
> >
> The only issues that our politicians run on are those that would keep
> them in power. Sisters may be uneducated about the issues because
> they
> are never made clear by those running but apolitical would be
> stretching.
> > >
> > > Economically, is the african woman equal to the african man? The
> > > traditional role of the woman in Africa is child rearing.
> >
> This may be the perception of many, but is it the reality? If all the
> women in Africa engaged in business were to disengage and wait for the
> man to fend for the whole family, famine of unimaginable proportion
> will
> ensue, let's not try it.
>
> > >
> > > Who controls the money machinary in Africa? Who sets the agenda
> for
> > > different developmental programs? Who controls our mineral and
> > natural resources? Is that economic equality?
> ???????
> >
> > There is no room to demand social equality, political equality or
> > economic equality.
> >
> There is room to demand whatever - it is a choice with consequences
> and
> a very personal one at that
>
> > Do I want to be feminist? NO!!!!!!!!!! Because then I would be
> > very different.
> >
> How would you be different. I am sure you are a HUMANIST which to me
> means more than being a FEMINIST.
> > To answer your question, the disclaimer is to let you to know that I
> am not
> > different - I am an African woman.
> >
> Like you, I am an African woman who does not demand but works for
> equality which could be attained by everyone treating the other as
> they
> would want to be treated (Idealistic?)
> > >
> > > JUST A THOUGHT:
> > > African men have governed our world from time in memorial, and
> look
> > at the mess we are in ------- maybe the women should be given a
> chance to
> > govern so can compare the difference
> >
> I agree. I think we will be better at it.
>
> > ( Note: I am not a politician ).
> >
> I am afraid you cannot escape being a politician - it is inherently
> human
> >
> > >
> > > Conjoh.
> >
> >
> In peace
>
> Soffie Ceesay
>


Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 00:01:37 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <34696261.4051@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Per!

You wrote:

> Firstly: In the above
> statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, gi=
ve
> me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must all=
ow
> dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
> constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another count=
ry.
> I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries.> =

>> Correct me if I am wrong, anyone.> =

=

There are many jobs in Sweden that require citizenship. To be able to
have for example, some jobs within Telia, the Swedish telecommunication
company, among many other places, you have to be a citizen. With the
tough times in Sweden at the moment, the citizenship requirement has
gone down from "responsible" jobs to many other jobs. Rummaging through
"Platsjournalen", the employment listings newspaper, I have seen
advertisements for cleaning jobs which require Swedish citizenship. The
most depressing aspect of this is that these jobs are hotel or normal
office cleaning jobs, not security-related jobs. I checked my e-mail
today when I got home from work. It was a bit late to give you actual
job ads. I=B4ll find some actual job ads tomorrow that require Swedish
citizenship and post it and I bet you=B4ll be very surprised to see the
nature of those jobs. =

I have also had discussions with friends who live in Finland and Norway
who have also indicated that there are certain jobs there (not only
those related to security institutions) that require citizenship. There
is nothing strange about that. If you go to The Gambia, there are
certain jobs you as a foreigner cannot hold.
On a related note, research reports in Sweden have indicated that the
unemployment rates for Swedes by birth and naturalised Swedes is much
better than for non-naturalised immigrants. According to an
Arbetsmarknadsstyrelsen report, in 1996, the unemployment rate for
non-Nordic citizens was 30,6%, for naturalised Swedes, 19,3% and for
Swedes by birth, 7,3%. The report went on to say "j=E4mf=F6rt med =

utomnordiska medborgare har invandrare med svenskt medborgarskap en
b=E4ttre arbetsmarknadssituation."(i.e. compared to non-Nordic citizens,
naturalised immigrants have a better labour market situation)
(Arbetsmarknaden f=F6r Utomnordiska Medborgare, URA 1997:3, p.9)
Another report (Invandrare till Arbete: Ett Handlingsprogram f=F6r
Arbetsmarknadsverket, Arbetsmarknadsstyrelse,1994,nr.501, p.5) that
charted the unemployment figures for different nationalities from 1987
to 1994 read thus:
ARBETSL=D6SHET F=D6R OLIKA MEDBORGARGRUPPER - 16-64 1987-F=D6STA HALV=C5R=
ET 1994
(UNEMPLOYMENT RATES F=D6R DIFFERENT GROUPS AGED 16-64 - 1987 TO THE FIRST=

HALV OF 1994)
Utomeuropeiska (non-European groups) from 14% in 1987- 37% in 1994
Utomnordiska (non-Nordic) from 6% to 28.5% =

Nordiska (Nordic) 4% to 13%
Svenska (Swedish) 2% to 8%
Another research carried out by Chef magazine to check the attitude of
bosses towards non-Swedes discovered that 92% of of all bosses would
give a Swedish citizen the job whilst 8% would give the job to a
non-Swede all other things (education, experience etc.) being equal.
(Chef, "=C4r L=E4get Hoppl=F6st", Chef, nr. 3, March 1996, p.20)
So you see Per, the situation for non-Swedes is very bad. If Gambians
can acquire dual citizenship, their situation on the Swedish labour
market might improve a bit. The trend in Sweden is basically the same in
other Nordic countries. I do not have employment any figures for Norway
and Finland at home but for Denmark (according to an OECD report in
1993), the unemployment rate for non-Danes was 28.5% whilst it was 10.5%
for Danes (OECD in Pockettidning, "Invandrare Drabbas H=E5rt av
Arbetsl=F6shet", Pockettidning, nr. 23, 1 September 1995, p. 5) Figures
for Norway would definitely follow the same trend.
In relation to the requirements of other countries for those
naturalising to give up their citizenship, we have to first realise that
there are more Gambians in other parts of the world than there are in
Scandinavia. In Sweden, when one is granted Swedish citizenship, one has
up to 4 years to give up his/her original citizenship. If the
authorities in his/her country of citizenship refuse after four years to
relieve him/her of his/her citizenship, he/she is granted Swedish
citizenship on top of the original citizenship. He/she thus acquires
dual citizenship. If the person applies for his/her children who are
minors and the application is accepted, they get Swedish citizenship
without being required to give up their original citizenship. The choice
becomes the parent=B4s. If he/she wants them to have dual citizenship,
he/she would not apply for them to be relieved of their original
citizenship. The Swedish government however warns the parent that it
cannot do much if the children are in trouble or are held against their
will in their original country as they are also citizens of that
country. =

In England,if they have not changed the law in the very recent past
without my knowledge, one is not required to give up one=B4s citizenship
before becoming a British citizen. There are many Gambians there who
have both British and Gambian nationalities. I don=B4t know how it is in
America and other countries. Maybe someone else can help.
I=B4ll post some examples of job ads tomorrow. I hope I have answered
some parts of your questions. Hej d=E5.
Buharry.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=

Per Grotnes wrote:
> =

> Hi Buharry.
> At 16:28 09.11.97 -0800, you wrote among other things:
> =

> =

> ".......in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one has to
> be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually responsibl=
e
> and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulated
> for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship."
> =

> Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, there=

> have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the ab=
ove
> statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, gi=
ve
> me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must all=
ow
> dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
> constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another count=
ry.
> I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Correc=
t me
> if I am wrong, anyone.
> =

> perG

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 17:02:14 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.971111165355.22232C-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Hi all,

The information below was circulated some time in September. For
more recent information, please visit the ASA website.
You will find the address at the end of the
message. Or send them an e-mail.

Cheers,

Ebrima.

-------------------------------

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
November 13 - 16, 1997
Columbus, Ohio

We regret to announce that the National Panels Committee is behind
schedule and this years ASA Annual Meeting Preliminary Program is not yet
ready.

Below please find information for those of you who wish to pre-register,
book your hotel room, and make your flight arrangements.

Just as soon as the Preliminary Program is ready we will post it on the
ASA web page and make announcements on both the H-Africa and Nuafrica
listsrvs.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause members and guests.

Christopher P. Koch, PhD
Executive Director
African Studies Association
Fax: (404) 329-6433
E-Mail: africa@emory.edu
www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/ASA_Menu.html


******************************************************************
AN INVITATION TO THE 40TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE

AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
November 13 - 16, 1997
Columbus, Ohio

ASA ANNUAL MEETING

The 40th Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association will be held
November 13 - 16, 1997, at the Hyatt Regency, Columbus, OH.

Hundreds of scholars from the United States, Africa, Europe, and Asia will
make formal presentations on nearly 200 panels and roundtables. Sessions
will focus on a wide range of subjects from many disciplinary
perspectives. Panels are organized into 17 distinct thematic sections.

The conference hotel is the Hyatt Regency at Greater Columbus Convention
Center, 350 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215. Tel: (614) 463-1234,
fax: (614) 280-3046, web: www.hyatt.com. The room rates are $94 single,
$99 double, $104 triple, and $109 quad (plus tax of 15.75%). The hotel
will guarantee these convention rates only until October 12.

Make your travel and hotel reservations early! We urge you to plan your
travel through the ASAs official travel agency, Conventions in America, by
calling 1-800-929-4242 (ASA #319), e-mail: scitravel@aol.com. They
guarantee you the lowest fare on any airline at the time of booking.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

ASA ANNUAL BANQUET
With address by ASA President Gwendolyn Mikell (Friday, November 14, 7:30
pm).

ASA WOMENS CAUCUS LUNCH
With address by Kay Raseroka, Head Librarian of the University of Botswana
(Saturday, November 15, 1:00 pm).


ASA BOOK EXHIBIT
Some sixty publishers and producers of Africana will display books,
educational material, and other goods.

AFRICAN FILM AND VIDEO
Screenings of several new African films, including prize winners from the
1997 Pan-African Film Festival in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and
films/videos from the new South Africa will be held at the annual meeting.
There will also be the return of the immensely popular Video Marketplace,
where conference participants can request to see documentaries and feature
films from and about Africa throughout the day.

AFRICA-RELATED EXHIBITIONS
Ohio State Universitys Center for African Studies, in collaboration with
the Skoto Gallery of New York; and Otterbein College, will both feature
African Art exhibitions during the time of the ASA Annual Meeting.

ASA PLACEMENT SERVICE
The ASA will provide a Jobs Registry at the conference. Individual ASA
members seeking employment may register, as well as institutions wishing
to advertise listings.

CONFERENCE INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET
Information concerning ASA and the Annual Meeting may be found on the ASA
web page:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/ASA_Menu.html

ON-SITE INFORMATION
Panel sessions begin at 12:00pm Thursday, November 13, and continue
through 4:00pm Sunday, November 16.

ON-SITE REGISTRATION AND PACKET PICK-UP HOURS:
Wednesday, November 12 2:00pm8:00pm
Thursday, November 13 10:00am5:00pm
Friday, November 14 8:00am3:00pm
Saturday, November 15 8:00am3:00pm
Sunday, November 16 8:00am11:00am

BOOK EXHIBIT HOURS:
Thursday, November 13 10:00am5:00pm
Friday, November 14 10:00am5:00pm

Mail your registration today! Preregistration forms must be received by
October 1. Registration materials received after October 1 will not be
processed. Participants whose materials do not arrive by that date will be
required to register and pay on-site fees in Columbus.


REGISTRATION FORM

Registration
ASA Members $85 _____
ASA Members earning less than $15,000 $50 _____
Non-members $110 ____
Non-members earning less than $15,000 $60 _____

Preregistration Discount (RECEIVED BY OCTOBER 1)
ASA Members $55 _____
ASA Members earning less than $15,000 $35 _____
Non-members $85 _____
Non-members earning less than $15,000 $50 _____

ASA Annual Banquet $ 32.50______
Womens Caucus Lunch $ 21 _____

I wish to join the ASA, please add my dues from below $ ________

Total enclosed $ _______

Check enclosed Charge my: Mastercard Visa

Account_________________________________ Expiry Date_______

Signature ______________________________________


1997 ASA MEMBERSHIP
All members receive ASA NEWS (four issues/year), AFRICAN STUDIES REVIEW
(three issues/year), and ISSUE: A JOURNAL OF OPINION (two issues/year).

1997 Membership Dues
Regular
Income over $ 60,0000 $85 _______
Income from $45 - 60,000 $75 _______
Income from $30 - 45,000 $65 _______
Income from $15 - 30,000 $50 _______
Income less than $15,000 $30 _______
Joint
Second person (lower of two incomes)
in household with one regular
member $30 _______
Postage and Handling
Oseas & Canada surface $6 _______
Oseas air $18 _______
Lifetime
One-time payment of $1200 or three
annual installments of $400 _______


Name _______________________________________

Address ______________________________________

City _________________________________________

State _________ Zip _______________ - ________

Country ______________________________

E-Mail ________________________________________

Affiliation _____________________________________

Office Telephone ________________________________

Discipline _____________________________________

Region/Country of Interest _________________________


AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION
Credit Union Building
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322

Tel:(404) 329-6410
fax: (404) 329-6433,
e-mail: africa@emory.edu
www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Home_Page/ASA_Menu.html





------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 23:06:58 +0100
From: "Bala Jallow" <bala@algonet.se>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
Message-ID: <199711112223.OAA21927@mx5.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thank you Njaga Jagne. I fully agree with you.

----------
> From: NJAGA JAGNE <jagnen25@hotmail.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
> Date: den 11 november 1997 22:23
>
>
> >Let's face it, English is a crazy language. There is no egg in
> >eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
> >English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France.

> ............
> >...........................is why, when the stars are out they are
> visible, but when the lights >are out they are invisible. And why,
> when I wind up my watch, I start it, >but when I wind up this essay, I
> end it.
> >
> Moe S. Jallow
> *********************************************************************
>
> MOE,
> you are just amazing. i would dearly love to meet you
> one day and just attach a face to this wondrous humorous
> character who continually brightens my days with his postings on
> this bantaba.
> for the second straight day, you have made me laught
> out loud from my guts like an ***** (the way people here
> look at me when i do). you have made me lighten up with new
> energy at the end of my classes when i am just about to drop
> out of sheer exhaustion. i was so amused by your "how smart
> are u" that i called some of my fellow students to share it
> with them. you just have that special touch. whatever it was
> that that "smart" stuff measures, i apparently don't have enough

> of it. i only saw 3 f's and had a tougher time finding the
> 6th f even after i read the answer. whatever it was that you
> had a purpose for these postings, i have found a special
> purpose for it. it makes me smile just thinking about them
> the whole day.
> keep it up bro moe, if this list does nothing else, it
> helps me get on with my days much better.
> untill i can log on again, this is a verrrry
> light-hearted ...........NNNJJJJAAAAGGGGAAAAA
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 14:56:47 PST
From: "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <19971111225648.7707.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain


I'm sorry I can comment on any of the contributions made today, But I
would like to tell everyone who is contributing that I find the topic
very interesting. Although at times I was feeling a little disturbed by
some of the comments. Especially when then debate between Jorn and Bass
started. Putting it very brief:
I think the aspect of racism when discussing a tribe or ethnic identity
should be treated with great care. Cliches are never fair to the
individual.
And as a young German I would like to remind you that the Germans
thought they had a similar relation as the one between the Gambians and
the Narrs. The Germans disregarded the Jews because of many things.
Certainly there was some reason to realize the economic power the Jews
were able to accumulate over history. But why did they do so? Because
until Isreal was founded they never had a country of their own. they
were forced to live in permanent exil. And the easiest and most
independent way of surviving was to do business which is not
bound to a place like farming and the like. It all ended in the greatest
desater mankind had to suffer the holocaust.
The experience I have made with some Lebanese in the Gambia tells me
that most are very concerned about how the country is developing and
thats because they do intermingle and identify with the country and its
people.

I would like to add some questions that I have:

Habib: who are the Lebanese jjc’s?
Daddy Njie: who are the Tabans and the Eids?
Bass: what does the expression Fafa Jawara imply?

best regards and good night to everyone. Jobst



______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 18:00:09 -0500
From: "Amadou L. Fall" <jambaar@enter.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Are some African women feminists?
Message-ID: <199711112259.RAA01266@mail.enter.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Modou Jallow wrote:

> Hello fellow Gambia-Lers,
>
> The message below is from a female friend who cosiders herself an AFRICAN
> WOMAN but who is not a FEMINIST....
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
==========================================================================
>
> > FEMINISM - A doctrine advocating the granting of the same social,
political,
> > and economic rights to women as the ones granted to men; also a
movement
> > to win these rights.
> >
> > A FEMINIST - A woman who demands/believes to be equal to a man
socially,
> > politically, and economically.
> >
> > A feminist is allowed to take responsibility of her life. She makes
every
> > decision on all aspects of her life. She freely expresses her needs,
and
> > demands how she should be treated. A feminist is empowered, and free to
> > pursue any career she chooses. I am an African woman; I cannot be a
> > feminist...
> >
> > Conjoh.

Moe,

I believe that she is trying to point out the futility of trying to be a
"Feminist" in the Western sense given the African Woman's situation (read
disadvantages). That is, the natural bias of parents that educate their
sons and not their daughters, resulting in the daughters not acquiring the
skills or know-how to compete on an equal footing with their brothers.

This is what I gather from reading Conjoh's forwarded message...


Peace!

Amadou Fall

------------------------------

Momodou



Denmark
10505 Posts

Posted - 01 Aug 2021 :  15:58:23  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 15:03:03 PST
From: "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: some questions
Message-ID: <19971111230303.17418.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

can anyone please answer the following questions:

1) Who could inform me about the activities of GAMSEM?
2) How does the word democracy translate into Mandinka, Wollof or the
other local languages in the Gambia?
3) Who can tell me if the Gambian housemaids or watchmen have ever tried
to organise themselves. Or if they have ever voice out any protest?
4) Is the Daily Observer online know apart from some selected issues? Or
any other newspaper?

Best regards. Jobst

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 23:00:21 +0000
From: "wendela@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
Message-ID: <v01510100b08e8a133521@[149.212.100.55]>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sent by wendela@commit.gm (Wendela Van Bilderbeek)
via Commit


>In a message dated 11/8/97 12:59:48 PM, you wrote:
>
><<Dear Gambia L Folks:
>
>Dr. Gamble asked me if anyone knows the answers to the following questions:
>
>1. There is an old custom in The GAmbia of someone giving a small present in
>the hope of getting a present of greater value in return. Is there any word
>in Gambian languages, including Creole, for this procedure?
>
>2. Does anybody know the names of the old landing places on the South bank
>opposite Karantaba?
>
>3. Has anybody ever heard of the following places which travellers mentioned
>in earlier centuries...Pompetory, Jerekunde, Bereck or Pereck, Oranto,
>Massamacoadum, Ponor, Jalacuna. And where are they?
>
>Any answers would be appreciated.
>
>Baraka - Liz Stewart Fatty
>
>>>
1. "Roatal" refering to the presents given to cousins (but limited to
ones uncle's son or daughter) at the time of the muslim feast of "Tobaski"
when muslims sacrifice lamba etc... . This gift can take different forms
ranging from drinks to ones clothes and other likes. The giver in return
obliged to give bigger presents ranging from new clothes to relatively
large sums of money etc... etc... .

3. dont know the others but Jerekunde sounds like the biggest town in the
Ganbia called Serekunda which is comprised of various areas such as
Latrikunda, Dippa Kunda, Talinding Kunjang, Bundung or Bubdung-ka-kunda
etc... etc... . This Town was founded by Sere Jobe after whom the town was
named after.

Momodou Njie (Cho)

wendela




------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 21:39:14 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:reparations
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971111121048.22249A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi folks,
a friend of mine sent me this email from the U.K. It is about
slavery and reparations and I found it interesting and hopefully we can
start a new dialoque on this subject. Also I wanted to acknowledge the
author but that information was not furnished to me.
Jere Jef,
Daddy Njie.
************************************************************************


Britain is not alone in being responsible for the enslavement,
exploitation and colonalisation of Africa and Africans,there
is no doubt however Britain played a major role.

The demand for reparations is made not only of Britain but of all
nations engaged in the Slave Trade and subsequent colonialisation
of Africa. Those of us based in Britain who are of African origin have a
duty at the very least to understand why we are in Britain and what part
these events have had in the creation of Britain's history and wealth.
Africa continues to be economically exploited and abused and it's
checkered history of so called self rule is used as evidence of an
intrinsic inability of Africans to govern ourselves. What we within the
Africa Reparations Movement contend is that there is little democracy in
Africa and that this is the direct legacy of imperialism. The hasty pull
out by Belgium, Britain and France of colonies that were ill prepared for
self rule has created a climate in which corruption and maladministration
have become widescale in many countries.

There has been no apology for the enslavement of millions of African
people, and there are some today that continue to argue that slavery was
generally a good thing because it "introduced us to civilisation". This
presupposes that there was no culture or civilisation in Africa before the
onslaught by Europe. Even if one accepts Europe's version of what
constitutes civilisation there is ample evidence that medicine, mathematics,
complex social organisation, engineering were but a few of the achievements
of Africa and Africans in the centuries prior to contact with Europe.. The
19th Century is replete with attempts to both deny and destroy evidence of
African culture. It was in this century as capitalism expanded and
consolidated that ideological justification began to be developed for the
oppression of African peoples and resources.

It was the belief that Africans were(are) inferior human beings that
justified not only the absence of financial compensation for slavery to
African peoples but the carve up of Africa by the 5 European powers in the
1880's. When Britain abolished the slave trade in 1834 slave holders were
paid 20 millions in compensation not a penny was paid to former slaves. In
many instances the rights and opportunities for former slaves was made
worse when slavery was abolished which indicates a punitive and inhumane
relationship with Africa peoples, a legacy which we believe still
persists. It is not only that of all peoples against whom a major wrong has
been done we should receive reparations as other peoples have done in the
past, we are now beginning to calculate the damage not only in terms of
the 10 to 20 million African people who were murdered during the Middle
Passage we are also looking at the loss to Africa of its fittest and
finest. We know that the old, the sick, the disabled were not taken, only
those young fit and active. What must the impact have been to African
villages to loose its most economically and socially active? We cannot
begin to put a monetary figure of this but if we are to repair the damage
of enslavement we must begin to consider the whole legacy of enslavement.
When we have raised the issue of Reparations publicly we have encountered
a European concern solely with money. They ask how much will it cost?
We consider this and offensive question which yet again reduces African
peoples to the level of commodities. Is it not enough that Europe created
a whole social institution out of buying and selling African people now
they can only see us in terms of money. When we speak of reparations we
speak of mear' repair. We wish to repair the damage to us psychologically,
economically, historically and financially. When demand, the return of our
Artifacts stolen, misinterpreted and abused museums and Collectors in the
West. We demand the creation of free and fair commodity markets for
African goods and the ending of cash crops for the benefit of Europe and
not local communities. We demand democracy in Africa and not leaders
supported and sustained by Governments and Corporations in whose interests
corrupt rulers govern. We demand the creation of a Continent fit for
African people in which we can discover and develop skills and resources
that are sustainable and in keeping with our best African Traditions.
Reparations means that as peoples of Africa origin we can value
ourselves as highly as others value themselves' the psychological damage
to us of skin lightening, and of elevating thing European over things
African can only do us harm. There may be things to be learned from Europe
and Europeans but there are things that Europe could usefully learn form
Africa and Africans. A new relationship must be forged in which there is
mutual respect and equality, this cannot happen whilst there is no repair
to the devastating damage done by enslavement. Africa, Africans and Europe
must understand and repair the basis of the current relationship.
There are very pressing reasons for a new relationship with Africa.
African peoples in Europe are increasingly finding ourselves subject to
overt persecution and discrimination as the barriers go up around fortress
Europe. And as the trading blocks of North America and the Pacific Rim
develop and Eastern Europe is brought closer to the West so the economic
isolation of Africa is seen to be manifest.For well over a hundred years
Africa has been seen only in terms of a repository of raw materials for
the West, to be plundered and exploited as they wished. We would be ill
advised to ignore the wider global perspective of current economic and
political developments. If Africa is to survive we must play our part in
its survival. Is it possible for Africa to be economically self sufficient,
especially if this included trade with the African Diaspora? What would be
the impact on local environments if rather than cash crops Africa produced
food stuffs for its own population with the majority of its trade internal
rather than external to Africa? What would an Africa wide transportation
system look like that connected Sierra Leone to Zambia without having to
fly first to London or Zurich. These are not irrelevant or impractical
questions but they are ones that are not currently being addressed. We
need to put our skills and energies into Africa. We need to reverse the
brain drain from Africa and the Caribbean to the US, Canada and Europe.
Our own self interest demands that we have somewhere to go when the going
gets tough and we should look very seriously at recent European
history as we witness the rise of fascism in France, Germany, Belgium and
Britain. There may be little point in us saying we were born here or that we
are really British or French. German Jews protested as they were pushed
into incinerators that they were German. This is a very bleak scenario and
it is one that we hope will not arise but it would be foolhardy to imagine
that it could not happen. What are our options? And are we playing into the
hands of fascists and racists by saying that we should leave Europe. We
believe that there are sound pragmatic reasons why we should want to make
Africa a place fit for Africans. firstly it would be an insurance policy
against rising fascism. Secondly why should we not consider going to
Africa if we can think of going to Canada or the USA. If as we
believe we win the argument for financial compensation Africa would become
a viable option for people of African origin to live and invest in. And
when Africa is strong the standing of African peoples will also be strong.
We do not demand that all people of African origin should return to
Africa what we seek instead is to make it a place of preference. Some of
us because of family and friends will want to stay here, this must be a
right one that will continue to fight for. But we also want to dispel the
lies and myths that make the idea of all things African so negative. We did
not come to Europe because of the weather we came because it was, we were
told the motherland (or fatherland). We came because there were few
economic choices for us if we wished to prosper. Given our skills of survival
and of creativity we can make Africa a place where all African peoples can
be free to achieve our full potential. Reparations starts with our self
image. Let us be proud to be African.











------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 22:52:02 -0500 (EST)
From: SANG1220@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: SANG1220@aol.com
Subject: "Rotal"
Message-ID: <971111225202_-1476378261@mrin45.mail.aol.com>

Jabou, you are right on I can add that during xtmas time, ny aunt Tanta Fama,
use to do just that Rotal nyu. My father in turn would recepricate during
"Tobaski" and buy her what she wants. I hope this helps Liz.
Thanks
Daddy Sang.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 00:37:56 -0500 (EST)
From: TOURAY1@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dr. Gamble...info request
Message-ID: <971112003756_540524538@mrin40.mail.aol.com>

Hey,
I know we Mandinkos call that 'FITAROO'.
That is refering to the presents given to cousins.

Lams

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 10:03:32 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <01bcee6f$ec51dde0$LocalHost@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Jobst!
Thanks for your response.Both your concern and warning are well
taken.I am sure you will agree with me that the atmosphere for this
bantaba,like its gambian namesake,is mostly festive and jovial,which i
personally like and enjoy a lot,and i am sure the same could be said about
you.But again,like its namesake,this bantaba must seriously and honestly
debate from time to time issues that could have profound consequences for
the future of the village.

Having said all these,I would to tell you to CHEER UP! for the carnival
atmosphere is back again at the bantabaaa!


Regards Bassss!

P.S.
FaFa Jawara was a popular name given to our former President,esp
within the Mandinka speaking communities.


-----Original Message-----
From: Jobst Münderlein <joppl@hotmail.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Wednesday, November 12, 1997 7:52 AM
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity


>
>I'm sorry I can comment on any of the contributions made today, But I
>would like to tell everyone who is contributing that I find the topic
>very interesting. Although at times I was feeling a little disturbed by
>some of the comments. Especially when then debate between Jorn and Bass
>started. Putting it very brief:
>I think the aspect of racism when discussing a tribe or ethnic identity
>should be treated with great care. Cliches are never fair to the
>individual.
>And as a young German I would like to remind you that the Germans
>thought they had a similar relation as the one between the Gambians and
>the Narrs. The Germans disregarded the Jews because of many things.
>Certainly there was some reason to realize the economic power the Jews
>were able to accumulate over history. But why did they do so? Because
>until Isreal was founded they never had a country of their own. they
>were forced to live in permanent exil. And the easiest and most
>independent way of surviving was to do business which is not
>bound to a place like farming and the like. It all ended in the greatest
>desater mankind had to suffer the holocaust.
>The experience I have made with some Lebanese in the Gambia tells me
>that most are very concerned about how the country is developing and
>thats because they do intermingle and identify with the country and its
>people.
>
>I would like to add some questions that I have:
>
>Habib: who are the Lebanese jjc’s?
>Daddy Njie: who are the Tabans and the Eids?
>Bass: what does the expression Fafa Jawara imply?
>
>best regards and good night to everyone. Jobst
>
>
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 06:38:04 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp1.erols.com
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <3469BF4C.6496@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Bassirou Dodou Drammeh wrote:
> =

> Jobst!
> Thanks for your response.Both your concern and warning are we=
ll
> taken.I am sure you will agree with me that the atmosphere for this
> bantaba,like its gambian namesake,is mostly festive and jovial,which i
> personally like and enjoy a lot,and i am sure the same could be said abou=
t
> you.But again,like its namesake,this bantaba must seriously and honestly
> debate from time to time issues that could have profound consequences for=

> the future of the village.
> =

> Having said all these,I would to tell you to CHEER UP! for the carnival
> atmosphere is back again at the bantabaaa!
> =

> Regards Bassss!
> =

> P.S.
> FaFa Jawara was a popular name given to our former President,esp
> within the Mandinka speaking communities.
> =

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jobst M=FCnderlein <joppl@hotmail.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Date: Wednesday, November 12, 1997 7:52 AM
> Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
> =

> >
> >I'm sorry I can comment on any of the contributions made today, But I
> >would like to tell everyone who is contributing that I find the topic
> >very interesting. Although at times I was feeling a little disturbed by
> >some of the comments. Especially when then debate between Jorn and Bass
> >started. Putting it very brief:
> >I think the aspect of racism when discussing a tribe or ethnic identity
> >should be treated with great care. Cliches are never fair to the
> >individual.
> >And as a young German I would like to remind you that the Germans
> >thought they had a similar relation as the one between the Gambians and
> >the Narrs. The Germans disregarded the Jews because of many things.
> >Certainly there was some reason to realize the economic power the Jews
> >were able to accumulate over history. But why did they do so? Because
> >until Isreal was founded they never had a country of their own. they
> >were forced to live in permanent exil. And the easiest and most
> >independent way of surviving was to do business which is not
> >bound to a place like farming and the like. It all ended in the greatest=

> >desater mankind had to suffer the holocaust.
> >The experience I have made with some Lebanese in the Gambia tells me
> >that most are very concerned about how the country is developing and
> >thats because they do intermingle and identify with the country and its
> >people.
> >
> >I would like to add some questions that I have:
> >
> >Habib: who are the Lebanese jjc=92s?
> >Daddy Njie: who are the Tabans and the Eids?
> >Bass: what does the expression Fafa Jawara imply?
> >
> >best regards and good night to everyone. Jobst
> >
> >
> >
> >______________________________________________________
> >Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> >Hello
The Lebanese JJCees are the newcomers who came recently from =

Senegal,Sierra Leone or Liberia after the turmoils in those countries. =

Like Basss and Joanna rightly said these later commers have not been =

part of the original family type settings we all proudly know when we =

mingled and parited etc together with the local indiginous Gambians. The =

same is true for the Akus and the Fulls also. There are some Fukani =

families that settled in the Gambia over 100 years ago . How can you =

bundle them up with the ones who came just a few years ago who do not =

even know the street names of Banjul ( whic is one my my quick tests for =

a REAL Gambian - I ask them if they know the names of some off side =

street in Banjul say for example Wellesly or Denton or James Senegal and =

if they cannot recall or pin point then I assume they are JJCees!!
I hope that anwers my question.
Peace =

Habib

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 06:39:07 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp1.erols.com
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <3469BF8B.4A32@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

chakys@image.dk wrote:
>
> Hello to the G-lers,
> I think that the narr's issue is shameful; because of the lack of
> tolerance and the right to the difference. The narr or lebanases are
> probably bad examples in Gambia, but the main question is who help
> them to be that bad according to our economic and social norms.
> I think you should better point at our leaders who give the
> opportunity to such a kind of unpleasant situation. They have to be
> more responsible in order to give a priority to the people
> well-being.
> Honestly! people who'd been living over the years in the Gambia must
> be considered as normal cityzens. I do believe their contributions
> can be great. The diversity can just be an advantage. The U.S is a
> typical example . Think about it!!!!!!!!
> The national convergence will give a better chance to all those
> peoples who are not feeling to be gambians. They will really
> appreciate that. We have to admit as a fact that the narr' shops are
> a great convenience to be all over the country.
> We need to stop being corrupted and give more opportunities to any of
> us to improve our living condition and empede the xenophoby to take
> over our indulgence.
> Chakys.Well said
Well said
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 06:49:06 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp1.erols.com
Subject: Re: some questions
Message-ID: <3469C1E2.46FA@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Jobst M=FCnderlein wrote:
> =

> can anyone please answer the following questions:
> =

> 1) Who could inform me about the activities of GAMSEM?
> 2) How does the word democracy translate into Mandinka, Wollof or the
> other local languages in the Gambia?
> 3) Who can tell me if the Gambian housemaids or watchmen have ever tried
> to organise themselves. Or if they have ever voice out any protest?
> 4) Is the Daily Observer online know apart from some selected issues? Or
> any other newspaper?
> =

> Best regards. Jobst
> =

> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.comJobst,
Jallow Jallow of the Gambia Union or anyone of his followers can easily =

answer these questions. I remember during the first civil unrests in th =

earlt sixties and late fifties when we were in high school with the then =

FIELD FORCE from Bakau ," Jallow is our leader we shall not be moved like =

a tree planted by the water" was a household song . Good old days.

Habib

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 13:25:40 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: No Subject
Message-ID: <971112132536_1903612313@mrin54.mail.aol.com>

Jobst Munderlein,

What is your purpose for enquiring about the activities of Gamsen?

Jabou Joh


Jobst Muenderlein wrote:

>

> can anyone please answer the following questions:

>

> 1) Who could inform me about the activities of GAMSEM?

> 2) How does the word democracy translate into Mandinka
Wollof or the

> other local languages in the Gambia?

> 3) Who can tell me if the Gambian housemaids or watchmen have ever tried

> to organise themselves. Or if they have ever voice out any protest?

> 4) Is the Daily Observer online know apart from some selected issues? Or

> any other newspaper?

>

> Best regards. Jobst

>

> ______________________________________________________

> Get Your Private
Free Email at http://www.hotmail.comJobst


Jallow Jallow of the Gambia Union or anyone of his followers can easily

answer these questions. I remember during the first civil unrests in th

earlt sixties and late fifties when we were in high school with the then

FIELD FORCE from Bakau
" Jallow is our leader we shall not be moved like

a tree planted by the water" was a household song . Good old days.



Habib



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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 10:43:00 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
Message-ID: <19971112184300.18186.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Amigos,

Is this ridiculous or what???? My comments later.....

Jai.
> Nigeria to Absorb Displaced Gambian Students
>
> Africa News Service
> 10-NOV-97
>
> LAGOS, Nigeria (PANA, 11/10/97)
> - Nigeria has agreed to admit some
> 32 Gambian students evacuated
> from the University of Sierra
> Leone, following the political crisis
> in that country, an official said
> Monday.
>
> The Nigerian minister of state for
> education, Iyabo Anisulowo, said
> the students would be absorbed by
> Nigerian universities. Their areas of
> studies were not stated.
>
> Visiting Gambian Secretary of State
> for the Interior Momodou Bojang
> requested for the absorption of the
> students when he met Anisulowo.
>
> The education ministry quoted
> Anisolowo as saying that Nigeria
> and Gambia enjoyed good relations
> and that Nigeria would always be
> ready to help Gambia.
>
> Since the independence of these
> two former British colonies, Nigeria
> has helped Gambia with personnel
> at the judicial, military and civil
> service level.
>
> Both countries have a military
> assistance pact, under which
> Nigerian instructors are sent to train
> members of the Gambian armed
> forces.
>
> The announcement of the latest
> education assistance came a day
> after Gambian President Yayah
> Jammeh's three-day official visit to
> Nigeria.
>
> He stopped over Friday on his way
> from the Gabon summit of the
> African, Caribbean and Pacific
> states.
>
> During the visit, he had talks with
> the Nigerian leader, Gen. Sani
> Abacha, on bilateral and regional
> issues.
>
> By Paul Ejime, PANA Staff
> Correspondent


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 11:41:14 -0800
From: MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU
Message-ID: <199711121941.LAA05690@mx3.u.washington.edu>

This is my take on the prostitution issue regarding Nigeria:

"Have we lost our humanity?"
I would like to put a different spin on this issue:
First, we will all recognize and agree that self preservation is
a defining characteristic of humans/animals; all of us would
agree that, with rare exceptions, every individual wants to live.
Indeed, theologians have presented heaven as possessing
attributes of unimaginable beauty, perfection, elegance; a place
of eternal joy and happiness the entry of which begins at death
however, under normal circumstances, even the most religious and
devout amongst us would not pray to die. Recently, (true or
fiction) there have been reports of cannibalism in South Korea
resulting from unprecedented hunger and starvation; in many war
torn countries it has not been rare to hear stories of
cannibalism. You see brothers and sisters, when it comes down to
it, people will even eat each other in order to live. Survival,
I submit to you, is a human instinct.
If, then, survival is a human instinct and individuals will
live if they can, individuals will, therefore, do all they could
to survive. We all know that as we dialogue on this forum this
very minute someone in Africa is dying (gradually or now) from
hunger and starvation; individuals are dying from malnutrition
because of not having enough to eat. Faced with a life and death
situation, who can then ask a family to be humane, descent, moral
....? If a family must survive and the only alternative (the only
viable alternative I might add) is prostitution, what matters to
that family is not decency, morality, or humane; what matters to
that family is a survival question. The family is certainly not
robing anyone of his or her belongings! The family certainly is
not killing anyone to maintain its livelihood. Such a family has
a reality; an unquestionable reality that no one seems to solve
for them. A people failed by nature, failed by the rest of the
world, failed by their own people and leaders, who can ask such a
people to be descent or humane faced with a survival
or death question. The question, "have we lost our
humanity?," should not be directed to families engaged in such
activities in my opinion. Reasoning and personal experience
should tell us that no family, no family will, by choice,
prostitute its own; it is contrary to all instincts observed in
the family by experts.
The question, "Have we lost our humanity?," must, therefore,
be directed to those that forced these families in to such
degrading, degenerative and indecent level of ruin. The singer
says, "In the abundance of water, the fool is thirsty."
Certainly, in the case of Nigeria it is in the midst of plenty,
in the abundance of water, even the wise is thirsty and hungry;
because the people are denied to drink and eat amidst plenty and
left to starve. Have we lost our humanity? Have we lost our
decency? Have we lost our human touch ..., to let a people
degenerate in to such a condition. We certainly have the right
to complaining about our history of colonialism, our history of
slavery, and how history of .... but in Nigeria where one of the
worlds most valued products (oil) is in abundance, no excuse can
be given for having the majority, a considerable majority, living
in such degrading conditions, forcing them in to dehumanizing
activities. Bad, when an external source is responsible for
such; beyond comprehension when a people does it to their own
people. You can be religious, you can be moral, you can be
humane when life is normal; however, when life is not normal,
when basic survival items are uncertain, when you eat breakfast
and don't know whether you will eat lunch, morality is not, could
not, and should not be the yard stick of measurement. The
ultimate source of the indecency, the degeneracy, the inhumanity
of a people failed by nature, failed by the rest of the world,
and, indeed, failed by its own is from these failures not from
within. When death shows its ugly face, one does and must do
everything possible to escape!!!
Peace
Mamadi Corra

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 11:46:44 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA - By Obaro Ikime (fwd)
Message-ID: <19971112194737.6099.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Folks,

The article below is one of the most moving ones I have ever read thus
far in my short life. Please read it and see for yourself...brilliant
piece!!!!

Any feminist in the house????

Jainaba.
Democracy guarantees nothing; only good people, and good visionary
leadership does.
*********************************************************************

Category: Editorial
Date of Article: 10/29/97
Topic: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA
Author: Obaro Ikime
Full Text of Article:

THE crowing of the cock woke me up from my deep sleep. The crowing
sounded as if the cock was perching by the hole in the wall that served
as
a window in my bedroom. It was so near and it was so penetrating. I was
irritated by the fact that even before I could overcome the displeasure
of disturbed sleep the cock crew again. Why won't the damned cock hold
its peace? Or move far away from my window-hole? I felt like getting up
and throwing something at the cock. Then suddenly I relaxed. I actually
smiled at my own bad humour. Has not God made the cock to herald the
coming of dawn everyday? Should not the cock do its appointed work? The
cock crew again. I felt guilty. It was time to wake up. But my body was
not ready. Yet, I had to get out of my bed. I yawned and stretched. Then
I swung my feet from my bed.

My bed is one of my prized possessions. It is an old iron with springs.
Years of usage had weakened all the springs. My increasing weight has
taken its toll on them. I hear that the white man has made something
that you put on the springs so that when you lie on it, you do not feel
the hardness of the springs. I don't have that thing for my bed. What I
have are two hand-woven mats and a thoroughly non-blanket that one of my
daughters gave to me some few years back. These days when I sit on my
bed the springs crack with my weight and sag towards the floor. But I am
glad that I have an iron bed. My mates do not have an iron bed, only my
husband has a better bed.

I swung my feet from the bed. Then I stood up. On the floor was my
youngest child. I woke him up as I made for the door. I went to the back
of the house to empty my bladder. Then I got back to my room and got
some water in a cup. I washed my face and picked up my pako (chewing
stick). Pako in mouth, I headed for the kitchen area to boil water for
my bath. While the water heated up, I swept my side of the compound,
while my son swept the room and verandah. There were a few other chores
to be seen to.

Because I had a long way to go to the market, I had to leave home very
early. Luckily, it wasn't my turn to cook for my husband today. Another
wife had that duty. My son is in primary school. I gave him money to buy
ogi and akara to eat before walking to his school which was some two and
a half kilometres from our home. Just as the late risers were getting up
and laying around a bit on their varandahs, I had my basket on my head
making for the bus stop nearest our homestead. It is a fairly long walk
and each day I feel a little tired by the time I get there. Today would
be worse because I have to go to another bus stop to catch a bus that
will take me to a nearby village to buy tomatoes, pepper and green
vegetables which I sell in Ibadan at the Bodija Market. My customer in
that village had assured me she would be ready when I come.

The bus ride to the village was rather rough and long. The bus kept
stopping, being re-started, stopping and being re-started. We were
nearly all women. From the way the bus smelt, it was clear many of us
had not had their bath that morning! Many still had their pako in their
mouths.

And some even spat on the floor of the bus. Eventually, we got to the
village which I was going. I got off the bus. My customer was ready.
Three baskets of tomatoes, two of pepper (tatase) and two of green
vegetables. By the time I had paid for them, I wasn't sure I could pay
my transport back to Ibadan. So I asked my customer to let me have N20
back. She kindly agreed, saying I should not forget to pay it back on my
next visit.

I waited for a very long time before I could get transport back to
Ibadan. This worried me because I did not want to miss the morning
market. Eventually, a bus came along and picked me. The driver was very
unfriendly. He made me pay almost thrice the normal charge for my
wares. Other passengers begged him to reduce the charge but he refused.
I agreed to his terms, though I was some N10.00 short. When the bus
conductor came to collect the money, I gave him all I had. He asked for
the remaining N10. I pleaded with him to let us get to the market in
Ibadan where I could borrow from a friend. He refused. Eventually, a
woman in the bus gave me the N10, saying she knew my place in the market
and would come and collect the money during the day. I thanked her
profusely.

At Bodija Market, I laid out my wares. I don't have a stall. But I have
a place which I use everyday. I put on my broad- brimmed hat made from
straw to shield me from the heat of the day. It was a particularly hot
day. Luckily, it was a good day for me. Buyers kept calling and buying.
By sunset, I had less than a basket of tomatoes left. All the pepper and
green vegetables had been sold. I had made a profit of some N350, with
just half a basket of tomatoes left. I asked my neighbour to keep an eye
on my tomatoes so I could go and buy what I would cook for myself and
child when I got home. By the time I was ready to leave for home, it was
already dark. The woman who gave me N10 called to collect her money. I
thanked her again.

When I got home, my son was saying he was hungry, and none of the other
wives could give him anything to eat. Fortunately, I had bought him some
bread, N20 worth. I gave him the loaf which he began to devour hungrily.
I set to cook us our evening meal. By the time we had dinner, I was more
than ready to go to bed. But luck was not on my side. My husband sent
for me. When I entered his parlour, I knew something was wrong. I knelt
to greet him and to ask what he wanted me for. He said he hadn't eaten
dinner; could I cook him something? I pointed out that I was not the
cook for that day and had not prepared myself to cook for him. He
shouted at me angrily.

"Are you mad, I say go and get me food. Or have you gone deaf too?"
My husband is a very greedy man when it comes to food. He never gives
us, the wives, money for food. But he can eat three times what we
women eat. Whoever is cooking for him has to cook extra hard that
week if she's to get him enough food. What I had was for me and my
child. I had to go back to the kitchen. Fortunately, I had elubo (yam
flour) at home. I made some amala. And I had to cook a little more meat
to add to what was left of the ewedu soup I had made earlier.

By the time my husband had eaten, and I had cleared up the plates, I was
ready to drop dead out of fatigue. The heat of the day had taken its
toll. My son was already fast asleep on the floor of my room. I was so
weak, I thought a cold bath would refresh me. As I was bathing, one of
the children was sent to call me. My husband was calling. So, after I
came out of the bathroom and rubbed my body, I walked over to my
husband. He was in his bedroom. I knew what that meant. I was in no mood
to sleep with him. But to say so is to invite severe beating, after
which he would still insist on sex. So, I resigned myself. I went back
to close the door to my room. Then I went in to him. It was a tiring
night. My husband kept waking me up.

Before I knew it, the cock crew. That cock again! Now another round
would begin. All for what? To train my children and to meet the sex
demands of my husband. That is all I live for. To meet the demands of my
husband and to train my children. The father of those children hardly
cares for or about them. But it is his name they answer at school, not
mine. He hardly buys them clothes or give them money. Yet they say we
too are human beings. We hear that some woman in Abuja is trying to help
us.

Perhaps, before I die that help will sip down to me. For now I am what I
am. There is no meaning to my life, save for the children God has given
me. I live for them. I just pray that when they are all grown, they will
make my life worthwhile. I labour from sunrise to sunset and often far
into the night, everyday, every week, every month, every year. No one
but my children value my sweat. Even they hardly say "thank you." For
them it is a duty that I owe them. No one owes me any duty. What a life.
One day you will meet me and know me. My name is ULENIWOMA - the
UnLEttered NIgerian WOMAn.
*********************************************************************

Dr. Obaro Ikime is a History Lecturer at the University of Ibadan,
Nigeria.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 14:05:24 PST
From: "Jobst Münderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Mobutus gold in the Gambia
Message-ID: <19971112220524.2522.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

I have just now (Wednesday, 12.11.1997, 22.15h) seen a short report on
the German TV channel ZDF about the above. It’s unbelievable.

A German Journalist (Jürgen Roth) has done some research to find out
about Mobutus wealth. He came across the company „Yoshad“ I think in
Geneva that had transferred Gold to the Gambia. The company belongs to
Mobutus son „Kungulu Mobutu“. A swiss banker confirmed that around 100
tons of gold (value: over 2 Billion $!!!) were transfered to Westafrica.
The Journalist went to the Gambia to find out. The had different
contacts that showed them around in Banjul and upcountry. He saw five
safes in a house in the south of Banjul, each contaning dozens of
goldblock each weighing between 3-5 kilogramm. Additionally there was
huge sacks and buckets with unmellted goldsand. They went to a place
around 100km from Banjul were the journalist was shown even more gold
burried in a place with tight security.

The context of this must be noted: Kabilas who ousted the Mobutu regime
seems to be worrying that the Mobutuclan might try to set up an army to
regain power in former Zaire. Therefore Kabila has set up an
international committee to find and secure the money and wealth mobutu
had stolen from the country. So far only about 150 Million Dollar could
be confiscated in Europe.

As soon as there are any additional news in the papers I will
leteverybody know.
Peace Jobst


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 18:12:53 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Mobutu's gold in Gambia
Message-ID: <971112180258_43072810@mrin52.mail.aol.com>

Well, l must say that l find this one a little far fetched. How could some
Gambian have brought all that gold into the country un-detected, especially
the way customs goes over everything with a fine toothed comb thses days. And
if one speculates that the Government knows something about it, why would
they entrust it to someone who would keep it in a safe in their house and
then readily lead foreign journalists to it at their asking? Very unlikely,
and a bit far fetched.

Jabou.


I have just now (Wednesday, 12.11.1997, 22.15h) seen a short report on
the German TV channel ZDF about the above. It's unbelievable.

A German Journalist (Juergen Roth) has done some research to find out
about Mobutus wealth. He came across the company "Yoshad" I think in
Geneva that had transferred Gold to the Gambia. The company belongs to
Mobutus son "Kungulu Mobutu". A swiss banker confirmed that around 100
tons of gold (value: over 2 Billion $!!!) were transfered to Westafrica.
The Journalist went to the Gambia to find out. The had different
contacts that showed them around in Banjul and upcountry. He saw five
safes in a house in the south of Banjul, each contaning dozens of
goldblock each weighing between 3-5 kilogramm. Additionally there was
huge sacks and buckets with unmellted goldsand. They went to a place
around 100km from Banjul were the journalist was shown even more gold
burried in a place with tight security.

The context of this must be noted: Kabilas who ousted the Mobutu regime
seems to be worrying that the Mobutuclan might try to set up an army to
regain power in former Zaire. Therefore Kabila has set up an
international committee to find and secure the money and wealth mobutu
had stolen from the country. So far only about 150 Million Dollar could
be confiscated in Europe.

As soon as there are any additional news in the papers I will
leteverybody know.
Peace Jobst


______________________________________________________
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Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 18:21:10 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gambian students and Nigeria
Message-ID: <971112182110_244122292@mrin40.mail.aol.com>

Jai,

l must say that l fail to see the ridiculousness in this. It sure beats them
being left hanging like some Sierra Leonian univ. students l found in Gambia
this summer. One of them was due to graduate this summer and the other one
was in his second year. They didn't know where to go or what to do as far as
the continuation of their education was concerned. l also remember one of
them telling me that their academic records had been burned or something to
that effect when l suggested transferring to another univ. l bet they wished
that someone would have arranged for them to continue somehow. These two boys
and their mom were staying with my sister and her husband who are good
friends with their parents, and it broke my heart everytime l talked to
them. They just sat around looking depressed every day.

Jabou.******

Jabou

Amigos,

Is this ridiculous or what???? My comments later.....

Jai.
> Nigeria to Absorb Displaced Gambian Students
>
> Africa News Service
> 10-NOV-97
>
> LAGOS, Nigeria (PANA, 11/10/97)
> - Nigeria has agreed to admit some
> 32 Gambian students evacuated
> from the University of Sierra
> Leone, following the political crisis
> in that country, an official said
> Monday.
>
> The Nigerian minister of state for
> education, Iyabo Anisulowo, said
> the students would be absorbed by
> Nigerian universities. Their areas of
> studies were not stated.
>
> Visiting Gambian Secretary of State
> for the Interior Momodou Bojang
> requested for the absorption of the
> students when he met Anisulowo.
>
> The education ministry quoted
> Anisolowo as saying that Nigeria
> and Gambia enjoyed good relations
> and that Nigeria would always be
> ready to help Gambia.
>
> Since the independence of these
> two former British colonies, Nigeria
> has helped Gambia with personnel
> at the judicial, military and civil
> service level.
>
> Both countries have a military
> assistance pact, under which
> Nigerian instructors are sent to train
> members of the Gambian armed
> forces.
>
> The announcement of the latest
> education assistance came a day
> after Gambian President Yayah
> Jammeh's three-day official visit to
> Nigeria.
>
> He stopped over Friday on his way
> from the Gabon summit of the
> African, Caribbean and Pacific
> states.
>
> During the visit, he had talks with
> the Nigerian leader, Gen. Sani
> Abacha, on bilateral and regional
> issues.
>
> By Paul Ejime, PANA Staff
> Correspondent


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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 15:37:05 -0800 (PST)
From: Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Please forward: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
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------------- Begin Forwarded Message -------------

From: "HURAI BETTS" <oneke@email.msn.com>
To: <sarian.loum@Corp>
Subject: Please forward: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 13:14:07 -0600
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Mr. Jallow,
That was a very interesting piece on the language we call Engish, and it
addresses some of the very points that i have often wondered about myself. I
have also been enjoying the other jokes that you have posted, and I'll
have to admit that they relieve the pressure after a long and grueling week.
Please "keep up the good work" and know that your efforts are appreciated!
Peace to all,
Hurai Betts







------------- End Forwarded Message -------------



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 15:42:30 -0800 (PST)
From: Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Please fwd:Re: Are some African women feminists?
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------------- Begin Forwarded Message -------------

From: "HURAI BETTS" <oneke@email.msn.com>
To: <sarian.loum@Corp>
Subject: Please fwd:Re: Are some African women feminists?
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 13:16:07 -0600
X-Priority: 3
X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V4.71.1712.3


Mr. Jallow,
This could indeed be opening a can of worms that have been struggling to
get out for some air.
I do believe that an African woman can express her views about the
inequality of men and women without being termed a feminist. The opinions
that Ms. Conjoh has formulated could have risen from an endless experience
with male dominance in our society. Although it is not inconceivable for an
African woman to be feminist, expressing one's views on feminin issues does
not in my opinion qualify as feminism. I definitely agree with most of her
comments, but that does not make me a feminist. Most men, African men in
general are born with silver spoons in their mouths, ie, nothing is expected
of them except to be the man of the house and do odd jobs around the house;
in return for this strutting around, they get to have all the privileges
that their hearts desire including having women as their maids instead of
their partners, sisters, or mothers. The African society encourages men to
behave this way, and in my opinion, this is very wrong. Who is it that
decided that a man should be the dominant member of the house? Men
themselves! Even though the situation is nowhere near being changed, and I'm
not saying that it should, I think that our mothers back home should try and
teach our brothers how to fend for themselves in the event that there are no
women around to do so for them. I've seen numerous cases where guys are
uprooted from their safe bubbles in the Gambia, and have a hard time
adjusting in a foreign society because they dont know how to fry an egg to
feed themselves, or to perform other basic neccessities that women used to
do for them. Instead of rambling on any further, I will cut it short, the
basic point is that women should be given the same opportunities as men, and
I'm sure in most cases they will even do a better job. No, we do not want to
take over the role of men in society, but give us a chance to prove
ourselves and show you our capabilities rather than dismiss us because we
are women.
On another note, being abroad has not influenced my thinking, which is what
I get most of the time for expressing my opinion on this subject. These are
opinions that I have always had and I dont consider myself a feminist for
expressing them.
Till next time, peace to all,
Hurai Betts







------------- End Forwarded Message -------------



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 16:57:06 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian students and Nigeria
Message-ID: <19971113005715.12190.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Jabou,

I can see that you are not up to date with what is going on in Nigeria.
Would you rather have those two gentlemen and all the others affected to
go to a university in Nigeria or rather a more stable country such as
Ghana???

Being a university student in Nigeria does not necessarily mean that you
will earn a degree regardless of your achievements. The whole system is
a mess. I know quite a few people who had to abandon their program
because of cult activities on campus, student riots etc..and for your
info., the 96/97 academic year is yet to be completed. Do you see my
drift??

In the interest of those affected, the secretary of state for education
not the interior should try to have these folks sent to Ghana or some
other stable country rather than Nigeria. They have suffered enough.
Talking about the guy who was due to graduate in the summer....I will
bet my last cent that he won't graduate before the year 2000, should he
decide to go Nigeria. Yeah, quite bold!!!

You probably know that the presidential elections in Nigeria is
scheduled for 1998....and judging from history, it has never been
smooth. One other reason for not frustrating those "boys" further.

I am sure the Government has a good intention for those affected by this
unfortunate event, my only advice is, please rethink your decision to
send these folks to Nigeria. Quite a few Gambians, as far as I can
recall, had to withdraw from Nigerian universities in the early 90's
because of student disturbances....it is even worse these days. I
thought Mrs. Jow is quite familiar with what I've just
written....Hmmmmmm. In any case, those folks deserve better!!

Cheerio,

Jainaba.
Tact is when you tell a man that he has an open mind, when he has a hole
in his head.
**********************************************************************
>Jai,
>
>l must say that l fail to see the ridiculousness in this. It sure beats
them
>being left hanging like some Sierra Leonian univ. students l found in
Gambia
>this summer. One of them was due to graduate this summer and the other
one
>was in his second year. They didn't know where to go or what to do as
far as
> the continuation of their education was concerned. l also remember one
of
>them telling me that their academic records had been burned or
something to
>that effect when l suggested transferring to another univ. l bet they
wished
>that someone would have arranged for them to continue somehow. These
two boys
>and their mom were staying with my sister and her husband who are good
>friends with their parents, and it broke my heart everytime l talked
to
>them. They just sat around looking depressed every day.
>
>Jabou.******
>
>Jabou
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 22:48:47 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gambian students in Nigeria
Message-ID: <971112224842_342671537@mrin45.mail.aol.com>

Jainaba,
Yes, l guess l was not aware of all the gaury details about happenings in
Nigerian univs. and thus, l was merely addressing the issue of arrangements
on behalf of students as opposed to none. It is curious that they would be
sent to Nigeria if indeed Prior Gambian students have infact experienced what
you say they did.


Jabou,

I can see that you are not up to date with what is going on in Nigeria.
Would you rather have those two gentlemen and all the others affected to
go to a university in Nigeria or rather a more stable country such as
Ghana???

Being a university student in Nigeria does not necessarily mean that you
will earn a degree regardless of your achievements. The whole system is
a mess. I know quite a few people who had to abandon their program
because of cult activities on campus, student riots etc..and for your
info., the 96/97 academic year is yet to be completed. Do you see my
drift??

In the interest of those affected, the secretary of state for education
not the interior should try to have these folks sent to Ghana or some
other stable country rather than Nigeria. They have suffered enough.
Talking about the guy who was due to graduate in the summer....I will
bet my last cent that he won't graduate before the year 2000, should he
decide to go Nigeria. Yeah, quite bold!!!

You probably know that the presidential elections in Nigeria is
scheduled for 1998....and judging from history, it has never been
smooth. One other reason for not frustrating those "boys" further.

I am sure the Government has a good intention for those affected by this
unfortunate event, my only advice is, please rethink your decision to
send these folks to Nigeria. Quite a few Gambians, as far as I can
recall, had to withdraw from Nigerian universities in the early 90's
because of student disturbances....it is even worse these days. I
thought Mrs. Jow is quite familiar with what I've just
written....Hmmmmmm. In any case, those folks deserve better!!

Cheerio,

Jainaba.
Tact is when you tell a man that he has an open mind, when he has a hole
in his head.
**********************************************************************
>Jai,
>
>l must say that l fail to see the ridiculousness in this. It sure beats
them
>being left hanging like some Sierra Leonian univ. students l found in
Gambia
>this summer. One of them was due to graduate this summer and the other
one
>was in his second year. They didn't know where to go or what to do as
far as
> the continuation of their education was concerned. l also remember one
of
>them telling me that their academic records had been burned or
something to
>that effect when l suggested transferring to another univ. l bet they
wished
>that someone would have arranged for them to continue somehow. These
two boys
>and their mom were staying with my sister and her husband who are good
>friends with their parents, and it broke my heart everytime l talked
to
>them. They just sat around looking depressed every day.
>
>Jabou.******
>
>Jabou
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com


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From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Gambian students and Nigeria
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 08:50:49 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA - By Obaro Ikime (fwd)
Message-ID: <01bcef2f$0b92c240$5f2185c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
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A couple of days ago,we were appalled by the alleged Prostituition Scandal
in the land Achebe and Sonyinka.I was going to agree with Mr.Corra that we
should not point fingers or blame the people involved ,since morality can
very easily go by the wayside when the very survival of the individual is at
stake.But after having read Professor Ikime's article, with its riveting
account of the very fatigued,depressing and almost hopeless life of Mis.
Uleniwoma,and after learning how incredibly she manages to earn a decent and
dignified living, not only for herself but also for her son and her spoilt
and uncaring husband - after learning all this,we have started to ask
whether,even in the face of death,selling ones flesh would be the only
'moral' choice left for the black woman.

You might argue that,It could have been less fatiguing for mis. Uleniwoman
to get herself a wealthy lover in the city , who would be more than willing
to give her more than the peanuts she gets from selling three baskets of
vegetables daily in the market ,in exchange for sexual favours.But
interestingly,she doesn,t even insinuate that, that could at all be an
option in her world,her Hellish life notwithstanding.

So,I salute Mis.Uleniwoma for her hardwork,dignity and refusal to be
defeated even in the face of adversity.She represents the black womanhood
all of us love,fear and revere.And I denounce in the strongest terms those
low-lives on their way to south east Asia to violate our honour and black
dignity.


Regards Bassss!

P.S.
Jainaba,thanks for the forward and keep up the good work down there!


-----Original Message-----
From: Jainaba Diallo <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 13, 1997 4:46 AM
Subject: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA - By Obaro Ikime (fwd)


>Folks,
>
>The article below is one of the most moving ones I have ever read thus
>far in my short life. Please read it and see for yourself...brilliant
>piece!!!!
>
>Any feminist in the house????
>
>Jainaba.
>Democracy guarantees nothing; only good people, and good visionary
>leadership does.
>*********************************************************************
>
>Category: Editorial
>Date of Article: 10/29/97
>Topic: Meet a Woman Called ULENIWOMA
>Author: Obaro Ikime
>Full Text of Article:
>
>THE crowing of the cock woke me up from my deep sleep. The crowing
>sounded as if the cock was perching by the hole in the wall that served
>as
>a window in my bedroom. It was so near and it was so penetrating. I was
>irritated by the fact that even before I could overcome the displeasure
>of disturbed sleep the cock crew again. Why won't the damned cock hold
>its peace? Or move far away from my window-hole? I felt like getting up
>and throwing something at the cock. Then suddenly I relaxed. I actually
>smiled at my own bad humour. Has not God made the cock to herald the
>coming of dawn everyday? Should not the cock do its appointed work? The
>cock crew again. I felt guilty. It was time to wake up. But my body was
>not ready. Yet, I had to get out of my bed. I yawned and stretched. Then
>I swung my feet from my bed.
>
>My bed is one of my prized possessions. It is an old iron with springs.
>Years of usage had weakened all the springs. My increasing weight has
>taken its toll on them. I hear that the white man has made something
>that you put on the springs so that when you lie on it, you do not feel
>the hardness of the springs. I don't have that thing for my bed. What I
>have are two hand-woven mats and a thoroughly non-blanket that one of my
>daughters gave to me some few years back. These days when I sit on my
>bed the springs crack with my weight and sag towards the floor. But I am
>glad that I have an iron bed. My mates do not have an iron bed, only my
>husband has a better bed.
>
>I swung my feet from the bed. Then I stood up. On the floor was my
>youngest child. I woke him up as I made for the door. I went to the back
>of the house to empty my bladder. Then I got back to my room and got
>some water in a cup. I washed my face and picked up my pako (chewing
>stick). Pako in mouth, I headed for the kitchen area to boil water for
>my bath. While the water heated up, I swept my side of the compound,
>while my son swept the room and verandah. There were a few other chores
>to be seen to.
>
>Because I had a long way to go to the market, I had to leave home very
>early. Luckily, it wasn't my turn to cook for my husband today. Another
>wife had that duty. My son is in primary school. I gave him money to buy
>ogi and akara to eat before walking to his school which was some two and
>a half kilometres from our home. Just as the late risers were getting up
>and laying around a bit on their varandahs, I had my basket on my head
>making for the bus stop nearest our homestead. It is a fairly long walk
>and each day I feel a little tired by the time I get there. Today would
>be worse because I have to go to another bus stop to catch a bus that
>will take me to a nearby village to buy tomatoes, pepper and green
>vegetables which I sell in Ibadan at the Bodija Market. My customer in
>that village had assured me she would be ready when I come.
>
>The bus ride to the village was rather rough and long. The bus kept
>stopping, being re-started, stopping and being re-started. We were
>nearly all women. From the way the bus smelt, it was clear many of us
>had not had their bath that morning! Many still had their pako in their
>mouths.
>
>And some even spat on the floor of the bus. Eventually, we got to the
>village which I was going. I got off the bus. My customer was ready.
>Three baskets of tomatoes, two of pepper (tatase) and two of green
>vegetables. By the time I had paid for them, I wasn't sure I could pay
>my transport back to Ibadan. So I asked my customer to let me have N20
>back. She kindly agreed, saying I should not forget to pay it back on my
>next visit.
>
>I waited for a very long time before I could get transport back to
>Ibadan. This worried me because I did not want to miss the morning
>market. Eventually, a bus came along and picked me. The driver was very
>unfriendly. He made me pay almost thrice the normal charge for my
>wares. Other passengers begged him to reduce the charge but he refused.
>I agreed to his terms, though I was some N10.00 short. When the bus
>conductor came to collect the money, I gave him all I had. He asked for
>the remaining N10. I pleaded with him to let us get to the market in
>Ibadan where I could borrow from a friend. He refused. Eventually, a
>woman in the bus gave me the N10, saying she knew my place in the market
>and would come and collect the money during the day. I thanked her
>profusely.
>
>At Bodija Market, I laid out my wares. I don't have a stall. But I have
>a place which I use everyday. I put on my broad- brimmed hat made from
>straw to shield me from the heat of the day. It was a particularly hot
>day. Luckily, it was a good day for me. Buyers kept calling and buying.
>By sunset, I had less than a basket of tomatoes left. All the pepper and
>green vegetables had been sold. I had made a profit of some N350, with
>just half a basket of tomatoes left. I asked my neighbour to keep an eye
>on my tomatoes so I could go and buy what I would cook for myself and
>child when I got home. By the time I was ready to leave for home, it was
>already dark. The woman who gave me N10 called to collect her money. I
>thanked her again.
>
>When I got home, my son was saying he was hungry, and none of the other
>wives could give him anything to eat. Fortunately, I had bought him some
>bread, N20 worth. I gave him the loaf which he began to devour hungrily.
>I set to cook us our evening meal. By the time we had dinner, I was more
>than ready to go to bed. But luck was not on my side. My husband sent
>for me. When I entered his parlour, I knew something was wrong. I knelt
>to greet him and to ask what he wanted me for. He said he hadn't eaten
>dinner; could I cook him something? I pointed out that I was not the
>cook for that day and had not prepared myself to cook for him. He
>shouted at me angrily.
>
>"Are you mad, I say go and get me food. Or have you gone deaf too?"
>My husband is a very greedy man when it comes to food. He never gives
>us, the wives, money for food. But he can eat three times what we
>women eat. Whoever is cooking for him has to cook extra hard that
>week if she's to get him enough food. What I had was for me and my
>child. I had to go back to the kitchen. Fortunately, I had elubo (yam
>flour) at home. I made some amala. And I had to cook a little more meat
>to add to what was left of the ewedu soup I had made earlier.
>
>By the time my husband had eaten, and I had cleared up the plates, I was
>ready to drop dead out of fatigue. The heat of the day had taken its
>toll. My son was already fast asleep on the floor of my room. I was so
>weak, I thought a cold bath would refresh me. As I was bathing, one of
>the children was sent to call me. My husband was calling. So, after I
>came out of the bathroom and rubbed my body, I walked over to my
>husband. He was in his bedroom. I knew what that meant. I was in no mood
>to sleep with him. But to say so is to invite severe beating, after
>which he would still insist on sex. So, I resigned myself. I went back
>to close the door to my room. Then I went in to him. It was a tiring
>night. My husband kept waking me up.
>
>Before I knew it, the cock crew. That cock again! Now another round
>would begin. All for what? To train my children and to meet the sex
>demands of my husband. That is all I live for. To meet the demands of my
>husband and to train my children. The father of those children hardly
>cares for or about them. But it is his name they answer at school, not
>mine. He hardly buys them clothes or give them money. Yet they say we
>too are human beings. We hear that some woman in Abuja is trying to help
>us.
>
>Perhaps, before I die that help will sip down to me. For now I am what I
>am. There is no meaning to my life, save for the children God has given
>me. I live for them. I just pray that when they are all grown, they will
>make my life worthwhile. I labour from sunrise to sunset and often far
>into the night, everyday, every week, every month, every year. No one
>but my children value my sweat. Even they hardly say "thank you." For
>them it is a duty that I owe them. No one owes me any duty. What a life.
>One day you will meet me and know me. My name is ULENIWOMA - the
>UnLEttered NIgerian WOMAn.
>*********************************************************************
>
>Dr. Obaro Ikime is a History Lecturer at the University of Ibadan,
>Nigeria.
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 08:39:46 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Power failure in the new Airport building.
Message-ID: <19971113074100.AAA51874@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Last night there had been a current failure in the new terminal
building at the Gambia International Airport. In the beginning they
were operating on the emergency supply but that also failed after a
short time. Could you imagine, there were a few candle lights and I
was lucky to have a pocket torch light with me inorder to keep an eye
on my luggage. At one time I saw a car packed infront of the main
exit with full lights on, giving light in the main building to
assist the new arrivals with Ghana Airways.
At least I was there for 1 hour and 40 munites before things were
normal. The funny thing is that there were full lights in the old
terminal building.

I wonder who was responsible for the mess but this is one of the
things which has still setting us back in development. The building
has just been officially opened about two or three ago. There was a
comment from a waiter that this is what they are living with,
meaning that this is not time.

The building is very beautiful both outside and inside but at the
moment is seems as it has the beauty of salt water.


Peace
Momodou Camara

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 08:39:45 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Back fro Gambia
Message-ID: <19971113074100.AAB51874@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
I have been away for a week and have to catch up with my mails. I
hope to reply some of you who sent me mails.

Welcome to all new members to the list.

Momodou Camara

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:14:04 +0100
From: "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <346B0B2B.695BB400@hs.nki.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

chakys@image.dk wrote:

> Hello to the G-lers,
> I think that the narr's issue is shameful; because of the lack of
> tolerance and the right to the difference. The narr or lebanases are
> probably bad examples in Gambia, but the main question is who help
> them to be that bad according to our economic and social norms.
> I think you should better point at our leaders who give the
> opportunity to such a kind of unpleasant situation. They have to be
> more responsible in order to give a priority to the people
> well-being

> Chakys.

Although I don't agree to some of the thinks the "new narrs" are
doing, I've got to agree to what Chakys wrote above.. The thing goes
both ways. They've got lots of encouragement from our leaders.

Isatou.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:43:04 +0100
From: "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
Message-ID: <346B11F6.D09AF2D7@hs.nki.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jainaba Diallo wrote:

> Amigos,
>
> Is this ridiculous or what???? My comments later.....



> Jai

This was my thought too when I read it as I was once a student in one of
the Nigerians Universities. After my second 6 month strike, I had to
give up.More comming later 'cause I got to go back to school work.....

> .>



> Nigeria to Absorb Displaced Gambian Students
>
> >
> > Africa News Service
> > 10-NOV-97
> >
> > LAGOS, Nigeria (PANA, 11/10/97)
> > - Nigeria has agreed to admit some
> > 32 Gambian students evacuated
> > from the University of Sierra
> > Leone, following the political crisis
> > in that country, an official said
> > Monday.
> >
> > The Nigerian minister of state for
> > education, Iyabo Anisulowo, said
> > the students would be absorbed by
> > Nigerian universities. Their areas of
> > studies were not stated.
> >
> > Visiting Gambian Secretary of State
> > for the Interior Momodou Bojang
> > requested for the absorption of the
> > students when he met Anisulowo.
> >
> > The education ministry quoted
> > Anisolowo as saying that Nigeria
> > and Gambia enjoyed good relations
> > and that Nigeria would always be
> > ready to help Gambia.
> >
> > Since the independence of these
> > two former British colonies, Nigeria
> > has helped Gambia with personnel
> > at the judicial, military and civil
> > service level.
> >
> > Both countries have a military
> > assistance pact, under which
> > Nigerian instructors are sent to train
> > members of the Gambian armed
> > forces.
> >
> > The announcement of the latest
> > education assistance came a day
> > after Gambian President Yayah
> > Jammeh's three-day official visit to
> > Nigeria.
> >
> > He stopped over Friday on his way
> > from the Gabon summit of the
> > African, Caribbean and Pacific
> > states.
> >
> > During the visit, he had talks with
> > the Nigerian leader, Gen. Sani
> > Abacha, on bilateral and regional
> > issues.
> >
> > By Paul Ejime, PANA Staff
> > Correspondent
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:44:02 +0100
From: "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian students: From the frying pan to .........
Message-ID: <346B1231.8C8DADC6@hs.nki.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jainaba Diallo wrote:

> Amigos,
>
> Is this ridiculous or what???? My comments later.....

I forgot to sign my name in my fisrt posting....

Isatou.

>
>
> Jai.
> > Nigeria to Absorb Displaced Gambian Students
> >
> > Africa News Service
> > 10-NOV-97
> >
> > LAGOS, Nigeria (PANA, 11/10/97)
> > - Nigeria has agreed to admit some
> > 32 Gambian students evacuated
> > from the University of Sierra
> > Leone, following the political crisis
> > in that country, an official said
> > Monday.
> >
> > The Nigerian minister of state for
> > education, Iyabo Anisulowo, said
> > the students would be absorbed by
> > Nigerian universities. Their areas of
> > studies were not stated.
> >
> > Visiting Gambian Secretary of State
> > for the Interior Momodou Bojang
> > requested for the absorption of the
> > students when he met Anisulowo.
> >
> > The education ministry quoted
> > Anisolowo as saying that Nigeria
> > and Gambia enjoyed good relations
> > and that Nigeria would always be
> > ready to help Gambia.
> >
> > Since the independence of these
> > two former British colonies, Nigeria
> > has helped Gambia with personnel
> > at the judicial, military and civil
> > service level.
> >
> > Both countries have a military
> > assistance pact, under which
> > Nigerian instructors are sent to train
> > members of the Gambian armed
> > forces.
> >
> > The announcement of the latest
> > education assistance came a day
> > after Gambian President Yayah
> > Jammeh's three-day official visit to
> > Nigeria.
> >
> > He stopped over Friday on his way
> > from the Gabon summit of the
> > African, Caribbean and Pacific
> > states.
> >
> > During the visit, he had talks with
> > the Nigerian leader, Gen. Sani
> > Abacha, on bilateral and regional
> > issues.
> >
> > By Paul Ejime, PANA Staff
> > Correspondent
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:58:31 +0100
From: "Kaira Isatou Boubacar" <kaiisa@hs.nki.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian students in Nigeria
Message-ID: <346B1597.A696D270@hs.nki.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gunjur@aol.com wrote:

> Jainaba,
> Yes, l guess l was not aware of all the gaury details about happenings
> in
> Nigerian univs. and thus, l was merely addressing the issue of
> arrangements
> on behalf of students as opposed to none. It is curious that they
> would be
> sent to Nigeria if indeed Prior Gambian students have infact
> experienced what
> you say they did.
>
> Jabou,
>

Jabou,
I can tell you guys alot about it as I mentioned in an earlier
postings...
but I'm busy right now with...I'll come to it later(maybe tomorrow?)

Isatou.

>
>
>
>
>




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:27:50 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New members
Message-ID: <19971113152906.AAA22066@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
Both Edi Sidibeh and Abdoulie Jammeh have been added to the list.
Welcome to our Bantaba and we look forward to your contributions.
You can send a brief introduction. Our address is
gambia-l@u.washington.edu


regards
Momodou Camara


*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:36:14 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: No Subject
Message-ID: <19971113153730.AAA61144@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Jabou,
Gamsen and GAMSEM are not the same!!!

Jobst is asking for GAMSEM which means GAMBIANS FOR SELF
EMPLOYMENT. Ousman Manjang is one of the initiators and they are
involved in community work.
I guess Soul or Hamidou can tell us more about their
activities.

Momodou Camara


On 12 Nov 97 at 13:25, Gunjur@aol.com wrote:

> Jobst Munderlein,
>
> What is your purpose for enquiring about the activities of Gamsen?
>
> Jabou Joh

>
>
> Jobst Muenderlein wrote:
>
> >
>
> > can anyone please answer the following questions:
>
> >
>
> > 1) Who could inform me about the activities of GAMSEM?
>
> > 2) How does the word democracy translate into Mandinka
> Wollof or the
>
> > other local languages in the Gambia?
>
> > 3) Who can tell me if the Gambian housemaids or watchmen have ever tried
>
> > to organise themselves. Or if they have ever voice out any protest?
>
> > 4) Is the Daily Observer online know apart from some selected issues? Or
>
> > any other newspaper?
>
> >
>
> > Best regards. Jobst
>
> >
>
> > ______________________________________________________
>
> > Get Your Private
> Free Email at http://www.hotmail.comJobst
>
>
> Jallow Jallow of the Gambia Union or anyone of his followers can
> easily
>
> answer these questions. I remember during the first civil unrests in
> th
>
> earlt sixties and late fifties when we were in high school with the
> then
>
> FIELD FORCE from Bakau
> " Jallow is our leader we shall not be moved like
>
> a tree planted by the water" was a household song . Good old days.
>
>
>
> Habib
>
>
>
> ----------------------- Headers --------------------------------
> Return-Path: <GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu> Received: from
> relay19.mail.aol.com 12 Nov 1997 06:53:19 -0500 Received: from
> lists3.u.washington.edu 12 Nov 1997 06:53:15 -0500 12 Nov 1997
> 03:53:07 -0800 Received: from mx5.u.washington.edu 12 Nov 1997
> 03:52:55 -0800 Received: from smtp1.erols.com 12 Nov 1997 03:52:54
> -0800 Received: from LOCALNAME 12 Nov 1997 06:59:16 -0500 12 Nov
> 1997 06:49:06 -0800 Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu Sender:
> GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu Precedence: bulk From: Habib Ghanim
> <hghanim@erols.com> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues
> Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu> Subject: Re: some questions
> References: <19971111230303.17418.qmail@hotmail.com> MIME-Version:
> 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable X-Cc:
> "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp1.erols.com X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1
> beta -- ListProcessor

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 14:57:40 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Update
Message-ID: <9711131957.AA68360@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hello Gambia-Lers,

Thank you for all your messages (both private and to the list). My hands
were kind of tied up with work, if you know what I mean. I am glad to be
back with you guys again. I will try to respond to your messages either
individually or to the list as soon as possible. In the mean time I would
like to make some quick comments on the following.

To Njagga, I would like to say "thank you too". Whenever I read your
messages, I can't help but laugh. You seem to have a very good sense of
humor that is always evidenced not only by how you write but also what you
write. It is people like you who make me send humorous jokes to the list.
After all, you know what they say about ALL WORK AND NO PLAY... right?

Bala Jallow, did you change your name from "Mamadou Jallow" to "Bala
Jallow" in order to avoid confusion? Regardless, it's nice to have you as
a member...and... enjoy!

To Lamin and Irie Ceesay (the love birds :-)), once again, welcome to
Gambia-L. Irie, I enjoyed reading your reply to the message titled: "Are
some African women feminists?" You have been very perceptive in your
observation of the Gambian gatherings and culture. Don't worry, it will be
a thing of the past once you begin to undersatnd the true culture - that
is when you visit the Gambia next year. Perhaps, we will talk about it
some more when we get together for "BENA CHIN" dinner sometime soon. Until
then, keep up the African spirit.


Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
===========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------------






------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:08:46 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Back fro Gambia
Message-ID: <9711132008.AA52148@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Momodou Camara, you wrote:

> Greetings,
> I have been away for a week and have to catch up with my mails. I
> hope to reply some of you who sent me mails.
>
> Welcome to all new members to the list.
>
> Momodou Camara

Greetings to you too, Tomaa,

Welcome back!

I sent you a message 2 days ago asking if you had come back. Please, reply
and tell me whatever good news you brought with you.

You've been missed around here.

Thanks.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 22:20:17 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <346BEDA1.720@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Per!
Sorry I couldn=B4t post the job ads yesterday. I was a bit busy. Here ar=
e
two:

"Lokalv=E5rdare; Kema St=E4d AB; Huddinge; 971107 (Cleaner; Company Name)=


St=E4dning av kontorslokaler i Sk=E4rholmens centrum. (Cleaning of office=
s)
Svenskt medborgare kr=E4vs. (SWEDISH CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED)
Varaktighet: tills vidare. 6 m=E5naders provanst=E4llning. Heltid. Dagtid=
=2E
08.00-17.00. M=E5nadsl=F6n. Kollektiv avtal finns. Tala med Sirrko Frid.
KEMA ST=C4D AB
BOTKYRKAV=C4GEN 4
BOX 1
143 01 V=C5RBY
Tel 08-740 0090
(af nr 012900- 700626 SIV)"

NOTE: Translation mine

SOURCE: Arbetsf=F6rmedlingen=B4s Homepage: =

http://Jobb.AMV.SE/text/26/971107,010080,240905,1,0129700626.shtml
------------------

"Lokalv=E5rdare; Purgo AB; Stockholm k; 971027

Kontors st=E4dning. (Office Cleaning)
Du ska ha st=E4dvana och svenskt medborgarskap (You should have cleaning
experience and Swedish citizenship)d=E5 kunden samarbetar med f=F6rsvaret=
=2E
Varaktighet: tills vidare. Tilltr=E4de 971110. Deltid. 3 timmar/dag, =

15 timmar/vecka. Timl=F6n. enligt avtal.
Kollektiv avtal finns. Arbetsplats: Vasagatan 11, Stockholm. Tala med
Jiri Barvic.
Purgo AB
Kl=F6vjestigen 3
163 47 SP=C5NGA
Tel 08-760 3426
(af nr 013000-704955 )MAL"

NOTE: Translation mine

SOURCE: Arbetsf=F6rmedlingens Homepage:
http://Jobb.AMV.SE/text/55/971027,010080,240915,1,0130704955.shtml

So you see Per, even for jobs that require no qualification, Swedish
citizenship is being required nowadays. I=B4m glad that Ba-Musa Ceesay wa=
s
able to bring the Norwegian perspective into the issue. Now you know.
Even in Norway, citizenship is being required for cleaning jobs.
Buharry.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=

MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
> =

> Hi Per!
> =

> You wrote:
> =

> > Firstly: In the above
> > statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> > scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, =
give
> > me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must a=
llow
> > dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our=

> > constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another cou=
ntry.
> > I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries.>
> >> Correct me if I am wrong, anyone.>
> =

> There are many jobs in Sweden that require citizenship. To be able to
> have for example, some jobs within Telia, the Swedish telecommunication=

> company, among many other places, you have to be a citizen. With the
> tough times in Sweden at the moment, the citizenship requirement has
> gone down from "responsible" jobs to many other jobs. Rummaging through=

> "Platsjournalen", the employment listings newspaper, I have seen
> advertisements for cleaning jobs which require Swedish citizenship. The=

> most depressing aspect of this is that these jobs are hotel or normal
> office cleaning jobs, not security-related jobs. I checked my e-mail
> today when I got home from work. It was a bit late to give you actual
> job ads. I=B4ll find some actual job ads tomorrow that require Swedish
> citizenship and post it and I bet you=B4ll be very surprised to see the=

> nature of those jobs.
> I have also had discussions with friends who live in Finland an=
d Norway
> who have also indicated that there are certain jobs there (not only
> those related to security institutions) that require citizenship. There=

> is nothing strange about that. If you go to The Gambia, there are
> certain jobs you as a foreigner cannot hold.
> On a related note, research reports in Sweden have indicated th=
at the
> unemployment rates for Swedes by birth and naturalised Swedes is much
> better than for non-naturalised immigrants. According to an
> Arbetsmarknadsstyrelsen report, in 1996, the unemployment rate for
> non-Nordic citizens was 30,6%, for naturalised Swedes, 19,3% and for
> Swedes by birth, 7,3%. The report went on to say "j=E4mf=F6rt med
> utomnordiska medborgare har invandrare med svenskt medborgarskap en
> b=E4ttre arbetsmarknadssituation."(i.e. compared to non-Nordic citizens=
,
> naturalised immigrants have a better labour market situation)
> (Arbetsmarknaden f=F6r Utomnordiska Medborgare, URA 1997:3, p.9)
> Another report (Invandrare till Arbete: Ett Handlingsprogram f=F6=
r
> Arbetsmarknadsverket, Arbetsmarknadsstyrelse,1994,nr.501, p.5) that
> charted the unemployment figures for different nationalities from 1987
> to 1994 read thus:
> ARBETSL=D6SHET F=D6R OLIKA MEDBORGARGRUPPER - 16-64 1987-F=D6STA HALV=C5=
RET 1994
> (UNEMPLOYMENT RATES F=D6R DIFFERENT GROUPS AGED 16-64 - 1987 TO THE FIR=
ST
> HALV OF 1994)
> Utomeuropeiska (non-European groups) from 14% in 1987- 37% in 1994
> Utomnordiska (non-Nordic) from 6% to 28.5%
> Nordiska (Nordic) 4% to 13%
> Svenska (Swedish) 2% to 8%
> Another research carried out by Chef magazine to check the atti=
tude of
> bosses towards non-Swedes discovered that 92% of of all bosses would
> give a Swedish citizen the job whilst 8% would give the job to a
> non-Swede all other things (education, experience etc.) being equal.
> (Chef, "=C4r L=E4get Hoppl=F6st", Chef, nr. 3, March 1996, p.20)
> So you see Per, the situation for non-Swedes is very bad. If Ga=
mbians
> can acquire dual citizenship, their situation on the Swedish labour
> market might improve a bit. The trend in Sweden is basically the same i=
n
> other Nordic countries. I do not have employment any figures for Norway=

> and Finland at home but for Denmark (according to an OECD report in
> 1993), the unemployment rate for non-Danes was 28.5% whilst it was 10.5=
%
> for Danes (OECD in Pockettidning, "Invandrare Drabbas H=E5rt av
> Arbetsl=F6shet", Pockettidning, nr. 23, 1 September 1995, p. 5) Figures=

> for Norway would definitely follow the same trend.
> In relation to the requirements of other countries for those
> naturalising to give up their citizenship, we have to first realise tha=
t
> there are more Gambians in other parts of the world than there are in
> Scandinavia. In Sweden, when one is granted Swedish citizenship, one ha=
s
> up to 4 years to give up his/her original citizenship. If the
> authorities in his/her country of citizenship refuse after four years t=
o
> relieve him/her of his/her citizenship, he/she is granted Swedish
> citizenship on top of the original citizenship. He/she thus acquires
> dual citizenship. If the person applies for his/her children who are
> minors and the application is accepted, they get Swedish citizenship
> without being required to give up their original citizenship. The choic=
e
> becomes the parent=B4s. If he/she wants them to have dual citizenship,
> he/she would not apply for them to be relieved of their original
> citizenship. The Swedish government however warns the parent that it
> cannot do much if the children are in trouble or are held against their=

> will in their original country as they are also citizens of that
> country.
> In England,if they have not changed the law in the very recent =
past
> without my knowledge, one is not required to give up one=B4s citizenshi=
p
> before becoming a British citizen. There are many Gambians there who
> have both British and Gambian nationalities. I don=B4t know how it is i=
n
> America and other countries. Maybe someone else can help.
> I=B4ll post some examples of job ads tomorrow. I hope I have an=
swered
> some parts of your questions. Hej d=E5.
> Buharry=
=2E
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
--
> Per Grotnes wrote:
> >
> > Hi Buharry.
> > At 16:28 09.11.97 -0800, you wrote among other things:
> >
> >
> > ".......in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one has t=
o
> > be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually responsi=
ble
> > and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulated=

> > for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship."
> >
> > Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, the=
re
> > have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the =
above
> > statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> > scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, =
give
> > me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must a=
llow
> > dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our=

> > constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another cou=
ntry.
> > I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Corr=
ect me
> > if I am wrong, anyone.
> >
> > perG

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:06:29 +0000
From: "narb@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <v01520d00b090947c2b4e@[149.212.100.55]>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Sent by narb@commit.gm (National Agricultural Research Board)
via Commit


>Date: 11 Nov 1997 17:51:23 +0100
>Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>Sender: GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu
>Precedence: bulk
>From: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
><gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity
>X-To: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no> (Receipt
>notification requested)
>X-Cc: gambia-l@u.washington.edu (Receipt notification requested)
>
>Svar til melding fra 13:36 tirsdag 11. november 1997
>-----------------------------------------------------------------
Per G. wrote:
>
>Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, there
>have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In the above
>statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
>scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship, give
>me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must allow
>dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to our
>constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another country.
>I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Correct
>me
>if I am wrong, anyone.

Ba Musa replied
>
>=3D I think you wrong,
>
>As a Gambian citizen working for NORAD I cannot get a job at one of our
>stations outside Norway because I`m not norwegian. There are even some
>cleaning jobs in certain government offices where only norwegians citizens
>are employed.
>But it is true that under Norwegian law you are not permitted to have
>citizenship in two countries. A Norwegian national who has applied for and
>been granted citizenship in another country automatically loses his/her
>Norwegian citizenship. The same is true of the reverse case: a foreign
>national who wishes to acquire Norwegian citizenship will be required to
>give up his/her former citizen.
>
>But in certain case, the legislation permits you to hold citizenship in
>more than one country.
>
>Cases such as:
>
>: If you acquired dual citizenship at birth because you have inherited two
>different nationalities from your parents.
>
>: If you were born of Norwegian parents in a country where citizenship is
>based on territorial principle.
>
>: If you have applied for a norwegian citizenship and it is not possible
>for you to be released from your original citizen.
>
>The last case might work for Gambians if Provision 13(4) in the draft
>constitution of the Gambia was adopted in the constitution of the second
>republic. Or what???
>
>Regards
>Ba-Musa Ceesay
>

My own contribution to this debate :

I agree entirely with Mr. Ceesay. I have lived, studied and worked for 20
years in Norway. I returned to the Gambia 3 years ago.

Being a foreigner, particularly, a "third world foreigner" guaratees you NO
job in Scandinavia. One example (there are several) that can be cited is
the case of a chinese doctor who emigrated to Norway, as a refugee, in the
early 90's. The fellow was a highly qualified doctor with several years
practice, and had a reasonable knowledge of the English language. Instead
of placing the fellow in his right profession, he was given a job as a
cleaner. The excuse was that the guy had no knowledge of Norwegian and
would, therefore not be able to communicate with his patients. He therefore
needed to learn the language first, and while he was at it, no other less
demeaning jobs could be offered to him.

My question at the time was: Was the man going to work in isolation? The
answer is certainly NO. The man was bound to work with a team who would
have been able to guide him through the Norwegian system. In my opinion
this fellow was being dicriminated by virtue of his citizenship, and more
importantly, because he was a "third worlder". Several UK citizens, with no
knowledge of Norwegian, handle top positions in Norway while simultaneously
taking Norwegian classes. How was the Chinese different ?

Another even more striking example is derived from personal experience. I
graduated with an M.Sc in Agriculture at the Agricultural University of
Norway in 1982. Since I was not planning to come home right away, I started
looking for a job. I am proud to say that I was among the best in my class
of 6 students, but I was the only Non-Norwegian. By the time we submitted
our theses, all of my classmates had secured jobs including the dullest
among us. I was also sending applications for employment all over the place
without success. One of the applications I was hoping to be successful in
getting, was for the position of Jordbrukssjef in R=A6lingen, Kongsvinger
area. I was the only qualified candidate, but also the only foreigner. At
the interview, I was given the impression by one of the interviewers that
the job SHOULD be mine based on my qualifications compared to those of the
other applicants. When I received a letter from R=A6lingen, I was made to
understand, in one line, that the position has been filled. No other
explanations were given.

I called the Chairman of the interview committee seeking an explanation.
His explanation was that the job was not given to me because they were
afraid that I wouldn't be accepted by the the farmers and members of the
local community!!!!!

I would have understood this if I was new in Norway and without any
knowledge of Norwegian society and language. But this was a guy who had
lived, studied and worked in Norway for 8 solid years, quite different from
the chinese doctor.

What do you call this if not discrimination based on citizenship.

The possible causes of this change in Norwegian society, and in fact, in
Europe is a subject linked to this one, but will be dealt with in my next
contribution. This was just to establish the fact that citizenship in
Scandinavia has a lot to say in employment.

Dr. A. S. Jeng






------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 22:33:29 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Humor: Isn't English a Silly Language
Message-ID: <346BF0B9.111D@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Moe!
I have to join the guys clapping for you. You really send some good
stuff. You are contributing to many a person=B4s good health as I read
somewhere that laughter is good for one=B4s health. Thanks for the time
you take to be so active in the bantaba and for the good stuff. Keep it
up.
Buharry.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=

NJAGA JAGNE wrote:
> =

> >Let's face it, English is a crazy language. There is no egg in
> >eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
> >English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France.=

> ............
> >...........................is why, when the stars are out they are
> visible, but when the lights >are out they are invisible. And why,
> when I wind up my watch, I start it, >but when I wind up this essay, =
I
> end it.
> >
> Moe S. Jallow
> *********************************************************************
> =

> MOE,
> you are just amazing. i would dearly love to meet you
> one day and just attach a face to this wondrous humorous
> character who continually brightens my days with his postings on=

> this bantaba.
> for the second straight day, you have made me laught
> out loud from my guts like an ***** (the way people here
> look at me when i do). you have made me lighten up with new
> energy at the end of my classes when i am just about to drop=

> out of sheer exhaustion. i was so amused by your "how smart
> are u" that i called some of my fellow students to share it
> with them. you just have that special touch. whatever it was
> that that "smart" stuff measures, i apparently don't have enoug=
h
> of it. i only saw 3 f's and had a tougher time finding the=

> 6th f even after i read the answer. whatever it was that you=

> had a purpose for these postings, i have found a special
> purpose for it. it makes me smile just thinking about them
> the whole day.
> keep it up bro moe, if this list does nothing else, it
> helps me get on with my days much better.
> untill i can log on again, this is a verrrry
> light-hearted ...........NNNJJJJAAAAGGGGAAAAA
> =

> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:29:27 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
Message-ID: <9711132029.AA59122@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Momodou Camara, you wrote:

> Last night there had been a current failure in the new terminal
> building at the Gambia International Airport. In the beginning they
> were operating on the emergency supply but that also failed after a
> short time. Could you imagine, there were a few candle lights and I
> was lucky to have a pocket torch light with me inorder to keep an eye
> on my luggage. At one time I saw a car packed infront of the main
> exit with full lights on, giving light in the main building to
> assist the new arrivals with Ghana Airways.
> At least I was there for 1 hour and 40 munites before things were
> normal. The funny thing is that there were full lights in the old
> terminal building.

This reminds me of a similar incident 3 years ago at the Dakar (YOFF)
Airport. Whilst waiting for our baggages upon arrival from AIR AFRIQUE,
the lights went off... NO WARNING whatsoever. We were left in the dark for
almost 45 minutes in one of the most theft-proned airports in Africa.

After that experience, I promised myself that I will never fly with AIR
AFRIQUE or land in DAKAR (YOFF) airport.

> I wonder who was responsible for the mess but this is one of the
> things which has still setting us back in development. The building
> has just been officially opened about two or three ago. There was a
> comment from a waiter that this is what they are living with,
> meaning that this is not time.

Acoording to Jone's Law, "the man who smiles when things go wrong has
thought of someone to blame it on." Like the waiter said, it was the first
time it has happened. Sooner or later they will have to experience is that
marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake when you make it
again.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 22:45:12 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Ethnicity and Identity - correction
Message-ID: <346BF378.19EA@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi!
In the Kema St=E4d AB job ad, I wrote: "Svenskt medborgare kr=E4vs." I=
t
should have read "Svenskt medborgarskap kr=E4vs". Thanks and sorry for th=
e
typing error.
Buharry.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=

MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
> =

> Hi Per!
> Sorry I couldn=B4t post the job ads yesterday. I was a bit busy=
=2E Here are
> two:
> =

> "Lokalv=E5rdare; Kema St=E4d AB; Huddinge; 971107 (Cleaner; Company Nam=
e)
> =

> St=E4dning av kontorslokaler i Sk=E4rholmens centrum. (Cleaning of offi=
ces)
> Svenskt medborgare kr=E4vs. (SWEDISH CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED)
> Varaktighet: tills vidare. 6 m=E5naders provanst=E4llning. Heltid. Dagt=
id.
> 08.00-17.00. M=E5nadsl=F6n. Kollektiv avtal finns. Tala med Sirrko Frid=
=2E
> KEMA ST=C4D AB
> BOTKYRKAV=C4GEN 4
> BOX 1
> 143 01 V=C5RBY
> Tel 08-740 0090
> (af nr 012900- 700626 SIV)"
> =

> NOTE: Translation mine
> =

> SOURCE: Arbetsf=F6rmedlingen=B4s Homepage:
> http://Jobb.AMV.SE/text/26/971107,010080,240905,1,0129700626.shtml
> ------------------
> =

> "Lokalv=E5rdare; Purgo AB; Stockholm k; 971027
> =

> Kontors st=E4dning. (Office Cleaning)
> Du ska ha st=E4dvana och svenskt medborgarskap (You should have cleanin=
g
> experience and Swedish citizenship)d=E5 kunden samarbetar med f=F6rsvar=
et.
> Varaktighet: tills vidare. Tilltr=E4de 971110. Deltid. 3 timmar/dag,
> 15 timmar/vecka. Timl=F6n. enligt avtal.
> Kollektiv avtal finns. Arbetsplats: Vasagatan 11, Stockholm. Tala med
> Jiri Barvic.
> Purgo AB
> Kl=F6vjestigen 3
> 163 47 SP=C5NGA
> Tel 08-760 3426
> (af nr 013000-704955 )MAL"
> =

> NOTE: Translation mine
> =

> SOURCE: Arbetsf=F6rmedlingens Homepage:
> http://Jobb.AMV.SE/text/55/971027,010080,240915,1,0130704955.shtml
> =

> So you see Per, even for jobs that require no qualification, Swedish
> citizenship is being required nowadays. I=B4m glad that Ba-Musa Ceesay =
was
> able to bring the Norwegian perspective into the issue. Now you know.
> Even in Norway, citizenship is being required for cleaning jobs.
> Buharry=
=2E
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
--
> MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA wrote:
> >
> > Hi Per!
> >
> > You wrote:
> >
> > > Firstly: In the above
> > > statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> > > scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship=
, give
> > > me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must=
allow
> > > dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to o=
ur
> > > constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another c=
ountry.
> > > I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries.>
> > >> Correct me if I am wrong, anyone.>
> >
> > There are many jobs in Sweden that require citizenship. To be able to=

> > have for example, some jobs within Telia, the Swedish telecommunicati=
on
> > company, among many other places, you have to be a citizen. With the
> > tough times in Sweden at the moment, the citizenship requirement has
> > gone down from "responsible" jobs to many other jobs. Rummaging throu=
gh
> > "Platsjournalen", the employment listings newspaper, I have seen
> > advertisements for cleaning jobs which require Swedish citizenship. T=
he
> > most depressing aspect of this is that these jobs are hotel or normal=

> > office cleaning jobs, not security-related jobs. I checked my e-mail
> > today when I got home from work. It was a bit late to give you actual=

> > job ads. I=B4ll find some actual job ads tomorrow that require Swedis=
h
> > citizenship and post it and I bet you=B4ll be very surprised to see t=
he
> > nature of those jobs.
> > I have also had discussions with friends who live in Finland =
and Norway
> > who have also indicated that there are certain jobs there (not only
> > those related to security institutions) that require citizenship. The=
re
> > is nothing strange about that. If you go to The Gambia, there are
> > certain jobs you as a foreigner cannot hold.
> > On a related note, research reports in Sweden have indicated =
that the
> > unemployment rates for Swedes by birth and naturalised Swedes is muc=
h
> > better than for non-naturalised immigrants. According to an
> > Arbetsmarknadsstyrelsen report, in 1996, the unemployment rate for
> > non-Nordic citizens was 30,6%, for naturalised Swedes, 19,3% and for
> > Swedes by birth, 7,3%. The report went on to say "j=E4mf=F6rt med
> > utomnordiska medborgare har invandrare med svenskt medborgarskap en
> > b=E4ttre arbetsmarknadssituation."(i.e. compared to non-Nordic citize=
ns,
> > naturalised immigrants have a better labour market situation)
> > (Arbetsmarknaden f=F6r Utomnordiska Medborgare, URA 1997:3, p.9)
> > Another report (Invandrare till Arbete: Ett Handlingsprogram =
f=F6r
> > Arbetsmarknadsverket, Arbetsmarknadsstyrelse,1994,nr.501, p.5) that
> > charted the unemployment figures for different nationalities from 198=
7
> > to 1994 read thus:
> > ARBETSL=D6SHET F=D6R OLIKA MEDBORGARGRUPPER - 16-64 1987-F=D6STA HALV=
=C5RET 1994
> > (UNEMPLOYMENT RATES F=D6R DIFFERENT GROUPS AGED 16-64 - 1987 TO THE F=
IRST
> > HALV OF 1994)
> > Utomeuropeiska (non-European groups) from 14% in 1987- 37% in 1994
> > Utomnordiska (non-Nordic) from 6% to 28.5%
> > Nordiska (Nordic) 4% to 13%
> > Svenska (Swedish) 2% to 8%
> > Another research carried out by Chef magazine to check the at=
titude of
> > bosses towards non-Swedes discovered that 92% of of all bosses would
> > give a Swedish citizen the job whilst 8% would give the job to a
> > non-Swede all other things (education, experience etc.) being equal.
> > (Chef, "=C4r L=E4get Hoppl=F6st", Chef, nr. 3, March 1996, p.20)
> > So you see Per, the situation for non-Swedes is very bad. If =
Gambians
> > can acquire dual citizenship, their situation on the Swedish labour
> > market might improve a bit. The trend in Sweden is basically the same=
in
> > other Nordic countries. I do not have employment any figures for Norw=
ay
> > and Finland at home but for Denmark (according to an OECD report in
> > 1993), the unemployment rate for non-Danes was 28.5% whilst it was 10=
=2E5%
> > for Danes (OECD in Pockettidning, "Invandrare Drabbas H=E5rt av
> > Arbetsl=F6shet", Pockettidning, nr. 23, 1 September 1995, p. 5) Figur=
es
> > for Norway would definitely follow the same trend.
> > In relation to the requirements of other countries for those
> > naturalising to give up their citizenship, we have to first realise t=
hat
> > there are more Gambians in other parts of the world than there are in=

> > Scandinavia. In Sweden, when one is granted Swedish citizenship, one =
has
> > up to 4 years to give up his/her original citizenship. If the
> > authorities in his/her country of citizenship refuse after four years=
to
> > relieve him/her of his/her citizenship, he/she is granted Swedish
> > citizenship on top of the original citizenship. He/she thus acquires
> > dual citizenship. If the person applies for his/her children who are
> > minors and the application is accepted, they get Swedish citizenship
> > without being required to give up their original citizenship. The cho=
ice
> > becomes the parent=B4s. If he/she wants them to have dual citizenship=
,
> > he/she would not apply for them to be relieved of their original
> > citizenship. The Swedish government however warns the parent that it
> > cannot do much if the children are in trouble or are held against the=
ir
> > will in their original country as they are also citizens of that
> > country.
> > In England,if they have not changed the law in the very recen=
t past
> > without my knowledge, one is not required to give up one=B4s citizens=
hip
> > before becoming a British citizen. There are many Gambians there who
> > have both British and Gambian nationalities. I don=B4t know how it is=
in
> > America and other countries. Maybe someone else can help.
> > I=B4ll post some examples of job ads tomorrow. I hope I have =
answered
> > some parts of your questions. Hej d=E5.
> > Buhar=
ry.
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------=
----
> > Per Grotnes wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi Buharry.
> > > At 16:28 09.11.97 -0800, you wrote among other things:
> > >
> > >
> > > ".......in certain countries such as the Scandinavian ones, one has=
to
> > > be a citizen to have certain types of jobs which are usually respon=
sible
> > > and high-salaried. Many Gambians can meet the requirements stipulat=
ed
> > > for the jobs but are disqualified because of their citizenship."
> > >
> > > Having been ill for a year I have not pestered you people lately, t=
here
> > > have been times where it was hard to shut up, but... Firstly: In th=
e above
> > > statement there is a statement that I do not understand, being a
> > > scandinavian myself. Which jobs are there that requires citizenship=
, give
> > > me an example please. Secondly, it is not only the Gambia that must=
allow
> > > dual citizenship in case you wanted a norwegian one. According to o=
ur
> > > constitution no norwegian citizen can hold citizenship of another c=
ountry.
> > > I would believe this is the case for all scandinavian countries. Co=
rrect me
> > > if I am wrong, anyone.
> > >
> > > perG

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:40:23 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
Message-ID: <9711132040.AA27046@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Correction of the previous mesage.

It should read:

Acoording to Jone's Law, "the man who smiles when things go wrong has
thought of someone to blame it on." Like the waiter said, it was not the
first time it has happened. Sooner or later they will have to learn that
experience is that marvelous thing that enables you recognize a mistake
when you make it again.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow



------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:49:09 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <199711132049.PAA08930@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
husband.

Malanding Jaiteh

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 15:54:58 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <9711132054.AA52966@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Malanding, you wrote:
>
> It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
> was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
> husband.
>
> Malanding Jaiteh

AGAIN??????? WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS WORLD??? LORD HAVE MERCY!!!!!!!!!!!

We had the the SAME type of tragedy about a few months ago (in New York or
Maryland) where the Gambian husband killed his Gambian wife.

Could some one in Maryland (or any state) please confirm with more
information.

Thank you.

Regards
Moe S. Jallow


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:00:03 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Dr. Ali Mazrui on Nigeria and Sierra Leone
Message-ID: <9711132100.AA41502@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hello Gambia-L,

Dr. Mazrui is probably one of the most brilliant minds on African
affairs today. Here is an excerpt from one of his many articles.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Dr. Ali Mazrui on Nigeria and Sierra Leone

"..Then came the military coup in Sierra Leone in 1997, which overthrew
the elected government of Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. In this case *Pax Africana*
took a wholly unexpected turn. A military government in Nigeria decided to
defend, and attempt to reinstate, a democratically elected government in
Sierra Leone.

This was certainly an improvement on the older story of Western
democracies propping up military regimes like that of Mobutu Sese Seko,
which was twice saved militarily by the West in the face of a domestic
challenge from its own Shaba province.

I personally would rather see a military regime like that of Nigeria
defending democracy in Sierra Leone, than see a democracy like that of
France or the United States propping up military dictatorships in less
developed countries. Yet for the time being the story of Sierra Leone
seems to be a stalemate. *Pax Africana* has not yet fully triumphed,
though the whole of Africa has condemned the June 1997 coup in Freetown."

---------------------------------
Culled from a longer article entitled "Africa's Own Trusteeship
System: Pax Africana Has Begun" in the latest edition of the
CODESRIA

Bulletin, Number 3, 1997.
----------------------------------

For those interested:

Dr. Mazrui's article can be obtained by writing to The Editor, CODESRIA
(Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa), P.O.
Box 3304, Dakar, Senegal.

You can also e-mail them at <<<CODESRIA@Sonatel.senet.net>>> or

call them on 825 98 22/ 825 98 23.





------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:17:44 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD49@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

I hesitated to inform the list earlier because, although the cause of
death has been ruled murder, the husband was being sought to be
informed,not that he was suspected. I fervently hope it was not by the
hands of her husband!!!!! I'll keep the list informed on any new
developments.


Ya Soffie

> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Thursday, November 13, 1997 3:54 PM
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
>
> Malanding, you wrote:
> >
> > It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring
> Maryland
> > was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her
> Gambian
> > husband.
> >
> > Malanding Jaiteh
>
> AGAIN??????? WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS WORLD??? LORD HAVE
> MERCY!!!!!!!!!!!
>
> We had the the SAME type of tragedy about a few months ago (in New
> York or
> Maryland) where the Gambian husband killed his Gambian wife.
>
> Could some one in Maryland (or any state) please confirm with more
> information.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Regards
> Moe S. Jallow
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 17:00:04 -0500 (EST)
From: Shieboyc@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <971113170002_-972915716@mrin39>

The lady Agie Sowe live at Hiwitte Ave in Aspenhill Maryland. Its been on TV
that she was found dead in her apartment. The cause of the dead is not yet
known. No arrest has been made.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 17:53:04 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <346B84D0.5A8E@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Malanding S. Jaiteh wrote:
>
> It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
> was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
> husband.
>
> Malanding Jaiteh
Yes it is true
The girl is the daughter of Sulay Sowe of Brikama. The husband is fula
from Guinea based in Gambia. May her soul rest in peace.
I do not know the details but I will ask Alhagi Lamar Barry . He knows
the couple.
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 18:00:16 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <346B8680.22F3@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Malanding, you wrote:
> >
> > It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
> > was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
> > husband.
> >
> > Malanding Jaiteh
>
> AGAIN??????? WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS WORLD??? LORD HAVE MERCY!!!!!!!!!!!
>
> We had the the SAME type of tragedy about a few months ago (in New York or
> Maryland) where the Gambian husband killed his Gambian wife.
>
> Could some one in Maryland (or any state) please confirm with more
> information.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Regards
> Moe S. Jallow
Moe
I just confermed it.
She was the daughter of Sulay Sowe of Brikama.RIP
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:41:26 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: introduction
Message-ID: <19971114004126.23353.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

I was born in Niani Kunting in the Central River Division. I am at the
moment studying in Malysia, Kuala Lumpur. I am pursuing BBA.

It is nice to be part of this group. I hope to be contributing my best
to it's advancement.

Sillah Conateh.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 16:48:37 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new members
Message-ID: <19971114004837.26148.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Can you please include the following people in The Gambia L
as members.

Njundu Sillah << ndunyakoi@hotmail.com>>

Lamin Sawo << sawol1@eng.und.ac.za >>

Marie Saine << msaine@hotmail.com >>


Thanks.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 22:56:23 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady (fwd)
Message-ID: <199711140356.WAA11806@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text


Sent this earlier on but to Jared's personal address.

Malanding Jaiteh


Forwarded message:
> From msjaiteh@mtu.edu Thu Nov 13 22:51:25 1997
> From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
> Message-Id: <199711140351.WAA11782@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
> Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
> To: globexinc@erols.com
> Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 22:51:21 -0500 (EST)
> Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
> In-Reply-To: <346B84D0.5A8E@erols.com> from "H. Jared" at Nov 13, 97 05:53:04 pm
> X-Mailer: ELM [version 2.4 PL24]
> Content-Type: text
>
> >
> > Malanding S. Jaiteh wrote:
> > >
> > > It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
> > > was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
> > > husband.
> > >
> > > Malanding Jaiteh
> > Yes it is true
> > The girl is the daughter of Sulay Sowe of Brikama. The husband is fula
> > from Guinea based in Gambia. May her soul rest in peace.
> > I do not know the details but I will ask Alhagi Lamar Barry . He knows
> > the couple.
> > Habib
> >
> I have been in touch with some family members the deceased and
> husband were staying with when they first arrived. Apparently the
> husband and the lady were last seen by the deceased's sister(also their
> apartment-mate) late Wednesday.She discovered the body thursday morning.
> Unfortunately the husband is nowhere to be found.
>
> It is the sister's wish that the body be returned to the Gambia. For
> those wishing to help please send contributions:
>
> Fatou Sowe
> 14216 Peartree Lane
> Apt 33
> Silver Spring
> Maryland 20906
>
>
>
> May her soul rest in Peace
>
> Malanding Jaiteh
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 05:58:29 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp3.erols.com
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <346C5905.208A@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

sillah conateh wrote:
>
> I was born in Niani Kunting in the Central River Division. I am at the
> moment studying in Malysia, Kuala Lumpur. I am pursuing BBA.
>
> It is nice to be part of this group. I hope to be contributing my best
> to it's advancement.
>
> Sillah Conateh.
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.comWelcome. I will contact you later. I have some friends in Malaysia
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 03:06:49 PST
From: "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Back fro Gambia
Message-ID: <19971114110650.16128.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain


>Momodou Camara, you wrote:
>
>> Greetings,
>> I have been away for a week and have to catch up with my mails. I
>> hope to reply some of you who sent me mails.
>>
>> Welcome to all new members to the list.
>>
>> Momodou Camara
>
>Greetings to you too, Tomaa,
>
>Welcome back!
>
>I sent you a message 2 days ago asking if you had come back. Please,
reply
>and tell me whatever good news you brought with you.
>
>You've been missed around here.
>
>Thanks.
>
>Regards,
>Moe S. Jallow
>

Hi Tomaa,
One good news is that the summer was not so bad as we all had feared.
Although hardship privails, there should be a good harvest for most
farmers. Rice havesting has not yet started in the CRD but I have seen
people havesting in the WD.


Regards
Momodou Camara

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 15:57:49 +0200 (EET)
From: edi sidibeh <lha7edsi@kyamk.fi>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.96.971114154259.2377A-100000@it4.kyamk.fi>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I am however impressed to join in the Gambia and Related Issues Mailing
List.I was burn in Bakau wasulung kunda.Presently i am living in Finland
and studying international business and administration in a town call
Kotka.I will not hasitate in sharing my ideas and thoughts concerning the
progress in our mother land (THE GAMBIA).


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:04:34 -0500 (EST)
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <971114100431_1080154974@mrin52.mail.aol.com>

Does anyone know who this lady is?

Jabou

hesitated to inform the list earlier because, although the cause of
death has been ruled murder, the husband was being sought to be
informed,not that he was suspected. I fervently hope it was not by the
hands of her husband!!!!! I'll keep the list informed on any new
developments.


Ya Soffie

> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Thursday, November 13, 1997 3:54 PM
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
>
> Malanding, you wrote:
> >
> > It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring
> Maryland
> > was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her
> Gambian
> > husband.
> >
> > Malanding Jaiteh
>
> AGAIN??????? WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS WORLD??? LORD HAVE
> MERCY!!!!!!!!!!!
>
> We had the the SAME type of tragedy about a few months ago (in New
> York or
> Maryland) where the Gambian husband killed his Gambian wife.
>
> Could some one in Maryland (or any state) please confirm with more
> information.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Regards
> Moe S. Jallow
>


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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:32:27 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Immigration Update (New Immigration Law)
Message-ID: <9711141532.AA30524@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Much of the information contained in this update was supplied by the
National Immigration Forum prior to the passage of the bill in question.


CONGRESS SENDS 245(i), CENTRAL AMERICAN BILLS TO PRESIDENT FOR SIGNATURE
------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Thursday evening, November 13, both the Senate and the House of
Representatives voted to approve and send to President Clinton the
appropriations bill that contains the compromise on Section 245(i). As
reported earlier, there will be no permanent extension. Instead,
immigrants who are already in this country and who have a relative
petition filed for them by January 14th, 1998, will continue to be able to
adjust status to permanent residents under 245(i). It is unclear whether
the familial relationship must exist by the date of enactment.

For employment-based immigrants, the grandfathering agreement covers those
whose employers submit labor certifications and visa petitions on behalf
or their workers by January 14, 1998. Employment-based immigrants who
enter legally and fall out of status will be able to adjust under a
separate provision of law (no fine) if they have not been out of status
for more than a total of 180 days.

Derivative beneficiaries are explicitly included in the grandfathering
compromise, a clarification since the last time we reported on
Congressional action. There is a possibility that the bill will not be
signed by the President for another 10-14 days. This will allow certain
people, most notably winners of the DV-98 Visa Lottery extra time to file
their 245(i) applications.

--------------------------------------------

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:42:11 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD4A@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain




> Does anyone know who this lady is?
>
> Her name is Agi Sowe from Brikama and she has been here in the States
> about 3 years. The husband is a Guinean national who lived in The
> Gambia. He is said to work in the neighborhood where they live but no
> one seems to be able to locate him.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:50:29 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Africa news highlights
Message-ID: <9711141550.AA42812@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

NAIROBI - The death toll from floods in Somalia has topped
500 and relief workers are worried about outbreaks of cholera
and other diseases in the coming weeks, an aid agency said. The
United Nations and Organisation of African Unity say as many as
800,000 people live in areas in southern Somalia affected by the
floods and an estimated 200,000 have been directly hit.

ABUJA - Nigeria's political parties were split over whether
they could accept military ruler General Sani Abacha as a single
candidate for elections, as a government minister has proposed.

ABUJA - Sierra Leone's exiled president Ahmad Tejan Kabbah
arrived in Nigeria for two days of talks with Nigerian military
leader General Sani Abacha, Nigerian officials said.

ACCRA - One man was killed and four policemen seriously
wounded when police clashed with diamond traders in the Ghanaian
town of Akwatia, police and mine officials said.

CAPE TOWN - Nobel peace laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu
threw his weight behind keeping South Africa's parliament in
Cape Town, saying Pretoria would be greedy to want it.

CAIRO - The Arab League urged the United States to
reconsider sanctions it imposed on Sudan for alleged sponsorship
of terrorism and human rights abuses.

ADDIS ABABA - Ethiopia launched a two-day nation-wide polio
immunisation drive targeting 8.5 million under-fives, the
Ministry of Health said.

PARIS - Donor nations pledged about $750 million in aid to
Uganda for the 1998 tax year, roughly the same as the preceding
year, the World Bank said. The Bank said this would include some
$320 million in quickly-disbursed budget support.

LUSAKA - A Zambian court granted a request for medical
attention for a detained army officer who said he had been
tortured by state agents investigating a coup attempt by rebel
soldiers last month.

N'DJAMENA - Chad's President Idriss Deby sacked three of his
ministers after finding them absent when he visited their
ministries, government sources said.

LUANDA - A summit between Angola's war rivals President Jose
Eduardo dos Santos and UNITA leader Jonas Savimbi later this
month could give the country's slow-moving peace process a
boost, officials said.

MAPUTO - The Mozambican government announced that the
country's first multi-party municipal elections would be held on
May 29 next year, five months later than planned.

CAPE TOWN - South African Foreign Minister Alfred Nzo quoted
his British counterpart Robin Cook as saying Britain planned to
invite Arab and African teams to assess Scotland as a venue for
a Lockerbie bombing trial.

CAPE TOWN - President Nelson Mandela will urge his
Indonesian counterpart Suharto to free jailed East Timor rebel
leaders when Suharto visits South Africa next week, Foreign
Minister Alfred Nzo said.

--------------------------------------
Courtesy Africa News Online






------------------------------
Go to Top of Page

Momodou



Denmark
10505 Posts

Posted - 01 Aug 2021 :  15:58:48  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 11:45:19 -0500 (EST)
From: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <199711141645.LAA04143@spruce.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

>
> Does anyone know who this lady is?
>
> Jabou
>
> hesitated to inform the list earlier because, although the cause of
> death has been ruled murder, the husband was being sought to be
> informed,not that he was suspected. I fervently hope it was not by the
> hands of her husband!!!!! I'll keep the list informed on any new
> developments.
>
>
> Ya Soffie

Sources close to the couple have reported history of violence since
the couple arrived from the Gambia. The marriage had been troubled
for sometime and the police had been called to the scene atleast once.
Earlier this year she had unexplained still-birth. I believe that the
husband who had been with her until late Wednesday should show up and
help the police to find the killer.

Malanding Jaiteh
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 12:51:01 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <9711141751.AA61834@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Malanding Jaiteh, you wrote:
>
> Sources close to the couple have reported history of violence since
> the couple arrived from the Gambia. The marriage had been troubled
> for sometime and the police had been called to the scene atleast once.
> Earlier this year she had unexplained still-birth. I believe that the
> husband who had been with her until late Wednesday should show up and
> help the police to find the killer.
>
> Malanding Jaiteh

Malanding and others,

I am not trying to make any speculations but it would seem very weird that
the husband would disappear just like that. Of course, It could just be
co-incidental but... what a co-incidence that would be! I'm sure many of
us are eagerly waiting for the autopsy reports for the probable
explanation of death. Until then, please continue to feed us with any
update information.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

PS
Can you furnish a contact telephone number for the sister of the deceased?



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 14:36:06 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Dr. Marable on GLOBALIZATION, CYBERSPACE AND RACISM
Message-ID: <9711141936.AA55578@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I found Dr. Marable's latest article very interesting. How about sharing
an excerpt of the aricle with you?

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: "GLOBALIZATION, CYBERSPACE AND RACISM PART TWO"

"...The invention of printing changed the entire world forever. It led to
mass education, scientific discoveries, new ways of understanding the
world around us. The invention of the computer chip is in every respect as
important as the development of printing. This new technology will alter
human civilizations in ways we can scarcely imagine today.

>From the standpoint of people of African descent and the third world in
general, the question must be raised, who will have access to this new
technology and who won't? What happens when we move to a cashless society
with all the information located somewhere in cyberspace, when many people
of color may be locked out of the Internet? What happens to black and
brown people when the globe moves toward a single international identity
card, with all personal information and even credit histories instantly
accessible? Will a sophisticated form of Jim Crow and colonialism
re-emerge to segregate and separate people of color, or those who are
defined as not being worthy of credit or capital?

[...]

Another factor to be considered is global environmental racism. Advances
in technology have accelerated the relocation of environmentally
destructive industries, such as automobile production, steel, mining,
timber processing, etc., from the first world to the third world. Petro
chemicals and pesticides which have been banned in the United States and
western Europe are freely available in Asia and Africa. Third world
countries are frequently pressured by global corporations to relax or
eliminate environmental protection safeguards. In the desperate
competition for jobs and capital investment, countries are forced to
sacrifice the health and safety of their own people. It is entirely
possible that Latin America, Asia and Africa may soon become dumping
grounds for billions of tons for waste materials generated by European and
North American populations.

Compounding these potential environmental hazards is the drive toward
economic development and modernization within third world countries. One
example is that of energy production. The cheapest and most readably
available source of fuel for many third world countries is low-grade coal.
Industrial emissions known as greenhouse gases are primarily the carbon
dioxide that comes from power plants and heavy industries. These emissions
are largely responsible for global warming and the depletion of the ozone.
The industrialized western nations are vigorously pressing China, India,
Brazil, Mexico and other third world countries to cut industrial
emissions.

However, for poor countries, strict curbs on emissions will also reduce
the possibility that more of their citizens will every enjoy anything like
the comfortable lifestyles taken for granted in rich countries. Population
growth and increased rates in life expectancy create a greater demand for
consumer goods and improvements in the quality of life. One should observe
here that by far the world's biggest polluter is still the United States,
the source of nearly one-fourth of all industrial emissions on the planet.
The U.S. contains barely five percent of the total population on earth,
but consumes nearly thirty percent of all resources, goods and services.

As Martin Luther King Jr. once asked, "Where do we go from here?" If we
accept the inevitability of globalization and the revolution in
technology, we must also look for ways to use this technology in the
pursuit of goals which affirm the integrity of diverse cultures and
societies, rather than destroying them. We must approach questions of
development which ensure the greater democratization of power and
resources, rather than the construction of new monopolies and elites. The
decline in the cost of technology could afford us the possibility of using
computer networks to coordinate strategic action and analysis involving
third world people, to better address real issues and problems in their
lives and societies. We could use the new technologies to enhance global
agricultural techniques, the quality of school education, the
accessibility of public health programs, and to enhance and improve the
environment. Strategies for the liberation of black and Third World people
must move to the battleground of cyberspace.

Source: "Along the Color Line"
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr. Manning Marable is Professor of History and Director of the, Institute
for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, New York
City.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 14:51:23 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <9711141951.AA44456@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

" WHEN YOU GET TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK,
YOU DON'T BELONG TO THE WHITE AND YOU
DON'T BELONG TO THE BLACK. YOU ARE TOO
GOOD FOR THE BLACK AND YOU WILL ALWAYS
BE BLACK TO THE WHITE "
- Janet Collins.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 12:29:02 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <19971114202902.23442.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Sir,

If I may ask, what is your criteria for choosing a particular quote as
being that of the week. I think the piece below is a piece of crap!!!
(no pun intended....afterall you are not Janet Collins).

You probably need to read it over a few more times if you wanna see my
point.

Cheers,

Jainaba.
> " WHEN YOU GET TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK,
> YOU DON'T BELONG TO THE WHITE AND YOU
> DON'T BELONG TO THE BLACK. YOU ARE TOO
> GOOD FOR THE BLACK AND YOU WILL ALWAYS
> BE BLACK TO THE WHITE "
> - Janet Collins.


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 12:44:12 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <19971114204412.26448.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

>Sir,
>
>If I may ask, what is your criteria for choosing a particular quote >as
being that of the week.

The sentence above should read:

If I may ask, what is/are your criterion/criteria for choosing a quote
as being that of the day????

Cheerio,

Jainaba.
-Democracy guarantees nothing, only good people and good visionary
leadership does.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 22:14:20 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: new members
Message-ID: <19971114211546.AAA30610@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-transfer-encoding: 8BIT

Greetings,
Njundu Sillah, Lamin Sawo and Marie Saine have been added to the
bantaba. We welcome them and look forward to their contributions.
You can send you introductions to gambia-l@u.washington.edu

Regards
¨Momodou Camara

On 13 Nov 97 at 16:48, sillah conateh wrote:

> Can you please include the following people in The Gambia
> L as members.
>
> Njundu Sillah << ndunyakoi@hotmail.com>>
>
> Lamin Sawo << sawol1@eng.und.ac.za >>
>
> Marie Saine << msaine@hotmail.com >>
>
>
> Thanks.
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 16:29:12 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <9711142129.AA67934@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Sister Jainaba,

I apologize if you found the quote offensive. I have no criteria for
selecting a particular quote of the DAY. I randomly select one from a list
of quotes that I have come across on that particular day.

Rest assured there's no harm taken; it will take more than a blow on the
head to get me offended. Besides, life would be very empty if one had
nothing to regret. But remember this is a quote that was made in the
1950'S. Surely, you will agree with me that to to have been the first
black ballerina to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in 1951 would not
have been an easy task.

Now let me ask you: how would you have responded if you were the first
black at an all white sport in white America?

Perhaps, Tiger Woods can help you answer that.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow



> Sir,
>
> If I may ask, what is your criteria for choosing a particular quote as
> being that of the week. I think the piece below is a piece of crap!!!
> (no pun intended....afterall you are not Janet Collins).
>
> You probably need to read it over a few more times if you wanna see my
> point.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jainaba.
> > " WHEN YOU GET TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK,
> > YOU DON'T BELONG TO THE WHITE AND YOU
> > DON'T BELONG TO THE BLACK. YOU ARE TOO
> > GOOD FOR THE BLACK AND YOU WILL ALWAYS
> > BE BLACK TO THE WHITE "
> > - Janet Collins.
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 23:01:27 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: 50 Dalasi Notes On The Offer
Message-ID: <19971114220253.AAA8498@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

The following is an extract from FOROYAA issue of 6-13 November,
1997

PRESIDENT JAMMEH DISPLAYING WEALTH!!!!!!!
Sometime ago President jammeh was on national television to display
21 vehicles which, he said had been given him as gifts to various
government departments. He claimed that the money came from Allah's
World Bank.

On 2 November, 1997, FOROYAA was asked to go near the State House
gate to witness President Jammeh's dishing out of D50 notes.
A large crowd had gathered and more were on their way to the State
House gate after hearing that President Jammeh was issuing money to
passers-by. Many were young children; some adults.
For example, Fama, who is said to be from Half Die end, is a ten
year old girl. She had a D50 note. One person who claimed to be Babou
Njie of Hegan Street had a D50 note. Others who were identified as
Musa Jallow, Musa Nyang, Lamin Camara, Ousman Bah, Mam Matty Faal and
Amie Mbye.

Interviewing the elderly people who stood gazing after Jammeh had
disappeared from the view, they claimed that they are needy people
who have heard that the President was giving out money.
Unfortunately, they were not so lucky to get any form of assistance.
In fact one lady claimed that she lost her pair of shoes in the push
and pull.
The most amazing development was the refusal of some people to go
even though Jammeh had gone in anticipation that he would turn up
again.

This reminds us of the days when Babandi Sissoho used to dish out
money. Beggars would walk from Serrekunda to Fajara and wait outside
all day just to see him pass. Sometimes they were driven by guards
but would linger somewhere in anticipation of his coming.
These people also just looked on with the hope that somehow Jammeh
would come back.

These are the trappings of poverty. Poverty dehumanizes. It
transforms a person into a mere object of pity. It throws a person
at the mercy of blind circumstances.
We hope that this pitiful sight will enable the president, in
particular and all Gambians, in general, to see the terrible nature
of poverty and motivate all well meaning people not to rest until all
Gambians can live dignified lives free from poverty.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 17:10:06 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <9711142210.AA64920@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Folks,

The husband is indeed the suspect!

I just now spoke with Ms. Fatou Sowe, the sister of the deceased, who
informed me that there is no doubt the husband killed the wife. She told
me that she left them at the apartment and when she came back the husband
was gone and his briefcase (which was always in the house) was missing.
The wife's corpse was found hidden under the bed. Police are still
investigating the murder. The husband's name is Momodou Lamarana Jallow.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

>
> Malanding Jaiteh, you wrote:
> >
> > Sources close to the couple have reported history of violence since
> > the couple arrived from the Gambia. The marriage had been troubled
> > for sometime and the police had been called to the scene atleast once.
> > Earlier this year she had unexplained still-birth. I believe that the
> > husband who had been with her until late Wednesday should show up and
> > help the police to find the killer.
> >
> > Malanding Jaiteh
>
> Malanding and others,
>
> I am not trying to make any speculations but it would seem very weird that
> the husband would disappear just like that. Of course, It could just be
> co-incidental but... what a co-incidence that would be! I'm sure many of
> us are eagerly waiting for the autopsy reports for the probable
> explanation of death. Until then, please continue to feed us with any
> update information.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> PS
> Can you furnish a contact telephone number for the sister of the deceased?
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 16:28:12 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>,
gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <199711142228.OAA19444@mx2.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
boundary="---- =_NextPart_000_01BCF11A.6687F0C0"

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------ =_NextPart_000_01BCF11A.6687F0C0
Content-Type: text/plain

Don't be blinded by the bright lights of America; this is the HEART of
Babylon. Some people seem to loose themselves here. Hold fast to the
teachings of the elders for they will bring you through.

My prayers go out to Sista Agi's family; and for him, that he would do
the righteous thing.

JAMMA JAM.

Keretha

> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Sent: Friday, November 14, 1997 4:10 PM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
>
> Folks,
>
> The husband is indeed the suspect!
>
> I just now spoke with Ms. Fatou Sowe, the sister of the deceased, who
> informed me that there is no doubt the husband killed the wife. She
> told
> me that she left them at the apartment and when she came back the
> husband
> was gone and his briefcase (which was always in the house) was
> missing.
> The wife's corpse was found hidden under the bed. Police are still
> investigating the murder. The husband's name is Momodou Lamarana
> Jallow.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> >
> > Malanding Jaiteh, you wrote:
> > >
> > > Sources close to the couple have reported history of violence
> since
> > > the couple arrived from the Gambia. The marriage had been troubled
>
> > > for sometime and the police had been called to the scene atleast
> once.
> > > Earlier this year she had unexplained still-birth. I believe that
> the
> > > husband who had been with her until late Wednesday should show up
> and
> > > help the police to find the killer.
> > >
> > > Malanding Jaiteh
> >
> > Malanding and others,
> >
> > I am not trying to make any speculations but it would seem very
> weird that
> > the husband would disappear just like that. Of course, It could just
> be
> > co-incidental but... what a co-incidence that would be! I'm sure
> many of
> > us are eagerly waiting for the autopsy reports for the probable
> > explanation of death. Until then, please continue to feed us with
> any
> > update information.
> >
> > Thank you.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Moe S. Jallow
> >
> > PS
> > Can you furnish a contact telephone number for the sister of the
> deceased?


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 19:41:53 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Dr. Mazrui on Nigeria.... and CODESRIA BULLETIN
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.971114190656.15960A-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi Folks,
Without wanting to indulge in any cheap propagander for Codesria
Bulletin, let me add a few words to what has been said on the above issue.

CODESRIA Bulletin is a quarterly, and "is distributed free of charge to
all African social science research institutes and faculties to
stimulate discussion, exchange information and encourage research
cooperation among African researchers." Anybody who wishes to do so can
also make "contributions on theoretical matters", or submit reports on
conferences and seminars". The Bulletin is published in English, French
and Arabic (the Arabic edition is printed in Cairo, by the Arab Research
Centre).

List members may also wish to know that any individual African scholar
who wishes to be put on the mailing list to get the Bulletin can do so
(just send an e-mail with your address); it is free for them too; there
was talk about charging a small subscription fee when it comes to
Africans based outside of the continent, and for non-Africans outside
the continent, so as to cover cost of postage;
the fee would be about ten dollars a year. But I am not sure whether that
decision has been implemented. So, you can just try, if you are
interested--if you want to contribute to the coverage of postage cost,
don't let anybody stop you from doing so too!

And I can assure you that to get information about Codesria
activities, and for anybody interested in
getting a hint of what African scholars are debating, this is a fairly
good medium. I personnally used to enjoy reading it while I was in Paris.

As for Ali Mazrui's views, CODESRIA Bulletin carried a debate on them for
nearly 18 months in 1995-96. It started with a piece written by Mazrui,
carried by the Int. Herald Tribune, to which Archie Mafeje, a South
African teaching in Cairo, reacted quite violently; and then a whole
series of rejoinders followed. Many of the contributors were critical of
mazrui's views on what he calls Pax Africana, one of whose expressions is
what he calls "self-colonization", with the stronger African states such
as Nigeria, DRC (ex-Zaire), South Africa, etc) being asigned the
task of maintaining order and keeping the peace in the clusters of smaller states
surrounding them. And so forth and so on....

Thanks Moe for bringing that up--drawing the attention of Gambia-lers to
Mazrui's article.

Have a good weekend,

Ebrima.

On Thu, 13 Nov 1997, Modou
Jallow wrote:

> Hello Gambia-L,
>
> Dr. Mazrui is probably one of the most brilliant minds on African
> affairs today. Here is an excerpt from one of his many articles.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> Subject: Dr. Ali Mazrui on Nigeria and Sierra Leone
>
> "..Then came the military coup in Sierra Leone in 1997, which overthrew
> the elected government of Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. In this case *Pax Africana*
> took a wholly unexpected turn. A military government in Nigeria decided to
> defend, and attempt to reinstate, a democratically elected government in
> Sierra Leone.
>
> This was certainly an improvement on the older story of Western
> democracies propping up military regimes like that of Mobutu Sese Seko,
> which was twice saved militarily by the West in the face of a domestic
> challenge from its own Shaba province.
>
> I personally would rather see a military regime like that of Nigeria
> defending democracy in Sierra Leone, than see a democracy like that of
> France or the United States propping up military dictatorships in less
> developed countries. Yet for the time being the story of Sierra Leone
> seems to be a stalemate. *Pax Africana* has not yet fully triumphed,
> though the whole of Africa has condemned the June 1997 coup in Freetown."
>
> ---------------------------------
> Culled from a longer article entitled "Africa's Own Trusteeship
> System: Pax Africana Has Begun" in the latest edition of the
> CODESRIA
>
> Bulletin, Number 3, 1997.
> ----------------------------------
>
> For those interested:
>
> Dr. Mazrui's article can be obtained by writing to The Editor, CODESRIA
> (Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa), P.O.
> Box 3304, Dakar, Senegal.
>
> You can also e-mail them at <<<CODESRIA@Sonatel.senet.net>>> or
>
> call them on 825 98 22/ 825 98 23.
>
>



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 17:01:03 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New members
Message-ID: <19971115010104.3316.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

I will be very much happy once again if you can kindly include the
follwing two people in The Gambia L.

Ebrima Jobe << jebrima@hotmail.com >>

Mustapha Fanneh << Fannehm@eng.und.ac.za >>

Your kind assistance is highly solicited.

Sillah Conateh.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 18:22:24 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New member
Message-ID: <19971115022224.21077.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

once again please help on registering fafanding fatajo as member of the
gambia L. << ffatajo@hotmail.com >>

Sillah.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 97 18:20:26 PST
From: "FIND THE GOOD IN EVERY PERSON...FOR EVRYONE DOES HAVE ONE" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <9711150220.utk12229@RR5.intel.com>


Does anyone know who this lady is?

Jabou,

I knew Aji Sowe personally.....she was a childhood friend of mine.... we used
to live close by each other. I remember I used to tutor her in math when I
was going to St. Peter's and she was going to Brikama Sec. Tech.

May her soul rest in perfect peace....Amen!!!

Pa-Abdou



hesitated to inform the list earlier because, although the cause of
death has been ruled murder, the husband was being sought to be
informed,not that he was suspected. I f



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 11:54:38 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Power failure in the new Airport building.
Message-ID: <01bcef48$9b712aa0$5f2185c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Elake!
Wecome back to the fold! I hope you had a nice trip back home.My
regards to the family!

Regards Basss!
-----Original Message-----
From: Camara, Momodou <momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 13, 1997 4:38 PM
Subject: Power failure in the new Airport building.


Last night there had been a current failure in the new terminal
building at the Gambia International Airport. In the beginning they
were operating on the emergency supply but that also failed after a
short time. Could you imagine, there were a few candle lights and I
was lucky to have a pocket torch light with me inorder to keep an eye
on my luggage. At one time I saw a car packed infront of the main
exit with full lights on, giving light in the main building to
assist the new arrivals with Ghana Airways.
At least I was there for 1 hour and 40 munites before things were
normal. The funny thing is that there were full lights in the old
terminal building.

I wonder who was responsible for the mess but this is one of the
things which has still setting us back in development. The building
has just been officially opened about two or three ago. There was a
comment from a waiter that this is what they are living with,
meaning that this is not time.

The building is very beautiful both outside and inside but at the
moment is seems as it has the beauty of salt water.


Peace
Momodou Camara



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 19:22:35 -0800 (PST)
From: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.96a.971114191456.16114A-100000@dante20.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hello Moe,
I wonder where you got the audacity to defend your actions. I
think Jainaba was right by any standard. I think we all need to exercise
caution when we send something out for all to read. I don't know what
you were thinking when you posted that posting, but it sure ruined my day.
I have never felt so low about myself for a long time. What even amasses
me most was the name you gave to it: "QUOTE OF THE DAY". I read this so
call "QUOTE OF THE DAY" when I was just getting ready to go to lab about
6hrs ago. I wanted to reply then but time was not on my side. I am glad
though, when I got the chance to do so, somebody already did. I just
could not stop thinking about it and I thought I will be better off to
vent my frustration out. As far as I am concern, when this quote was made
does not excuse the use of it on this list, and for tiger wood been a
prominent golfer in an all white sport, I just cannot see the connection.
I think we all need to be a little more responsible with our postings. As
the old adage goes: "a journalist's pen is more dangerous than a gun".
True or not is immaterial. I just want a foundation for my argument and
to draw a link. By any stretch of imagination, you would not meet
somebody in the street, slap him and erupt a fight. All over the world
conflicts, by any measure, start with irresponsible comments. Yes this is
a democratic society and yes we are all entitle to our opinion and yes, by
the same token, I reserve the right not to be insulted on a forum like
this. No offence intended mister and I am not trying to belittle you, I am
just overwhelmed with emotions. For one of my brothers to make such
remarks, does not matter the original author, was beyond the realm of my
comprehension. I think we all deserve a big apology printed in bold to
help heal the wounds.
Thanx.
Dawda Singhateh.



On Fri, 14 Nov 1997, Modou Jallow wrote:

> Sister Jainaba,
>
> I apologize if you found the quote offensive. I have no criteria for
> selecting a particular quote of the DAY. I randomly select one from a list
> of quotes that I have come across on that particular day.
>
> Rest assured there's no harm taken; it will take more than a blow on the
> head to get me offended. Besides, life would be very empty if one had
> nothing to regret. But remember this is a quote that was made in the
> 1950'S. Surely, you will agree with me that to to have been the first
> black ballerina to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in 1951 would not
> have been an easy task.
>
> Now let me ask you: how would you have responded if you were the first
> black at an all white sport in white America?
>
> Perhaps, Tiger Woods can help you answer that.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
>
>
> > Sir,
> >
> > If I may ask, what is your criteria for choosing a particular quote as
> > being that of the week. I think the piece below is a piece of crap!!!
> > (no pun intended....afterall you are not Janet Collins).
> >
> > You probably need to read it over a few more times if you wanna see my
> > point.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Jainaba.
> > > " WHEN YOU GET TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK,
> > > YOU DON'T BELONG TO THE WHITE AND YOU
> > > DON'T BELONG TO THE BLACK. YOU ARE TOO
> > > GOOD FOR THE BLACK AND YOU WILL ALWAYS
> > > BE BLACK TO THE WHITE "
> > > - Janet Collins.
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________________
> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> >
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 06:42:49 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <01bcf0af$610fcde0$d52185c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Keretha,
Thanks for your clearsightedness;and keep up the good work
down there.

Regards Bassss!!
-----Original Message-----
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Saturday, November 15, 1997 7:25 AM
Subject: RE: Tragic death of =


>Don't be blinded by the bright lights of America; this is the HEART of
>Babylon. Some people seem to loose themselves here. Hold fast to the
>teachings of the elders for they will bring you through.
>
>My prayers go out to Sista Agi's family; and for him, that he would do
>the righteous thing.
>
>JAMMA JAM.
>
>Keretha
>
>> ----------
>> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
>> Sent: Friday, November 14, 1997 4:10 PM
>> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
>> Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
>>
>> Folks,
>>
>> The husband is indeed the suspect!
>>
>> I just now spoke with Ms. Fatou Sowe, the sister of the deceased, who
>> informed me that there is no doubt the husband killed the wife. She
>> told
>> me that she left them at the apartment and when she came back the
>> husband
>> was gone and his briefcase (which was always in the house) was
>> missing.
>> The wife's corpse was found hidden under the bed. Police are still
>> investigating the murder. The husband's name is Momodou Lamarana
>> Jallow.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Moe S. Jallow
>>
>> >
>> > Malanding Jaiteh, you wrote:
>> > >
>> > > Sources close to the couple have reported history of violence
>> since
>> > > the couple arrived from the Gambia. The marriage had been troubled
>>
>> > > for sometime and the police had been called to the scene atleast
>> once.
>> > > Earlier this year she had unexplained still-birth. I believe that
>> the
>> > > husband who had been with her until late Wednesday should show up
>> and
>> > > help the police to find the killer.
>> > >
>> > > Malanding Jaiteh
>> >
>> > Malanding and others,
>> >
>> > I am not trying to make any speculations but it would seem very
>> weird that
>> > the husband would disappear just like that. Of course, It could just
>> be
>> > co-incidental but... what a co-incidence that would be! I'm sure
>> many of
>> > us are eagerly waiting for the autopsy reports for the probable
>> > explanation of death. Until then, please continue to feed us with
>> any
>> > update information.
>> >
>> > Thank you.
>> >
>> > Regards,
>> > Moe S. Jallow
>> >
>> > PS
>> > Can you furnish a contact telephone number for the sister of the
>> deceased?
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 21:24:59 -0800 (PST)
From: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.96a.971114211802.54830A-100000@dante04.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hello Moe,
Just a question that I thought I ask or should I say "QUESTION OF
THE DAY". In a nut shell, this is what I infer by your posting, "QUOTE OF
THE DAY": "that a good black man or woman for that matter is too good to
be called or perceived black and to the white man he is still black". Now
my question is, if this was any thing to hold water, where does a good
black man fit? You reserve the liberty to not send your reply back to the
list. I just want you to ponder over it, perhaps think about it when you
go to sleep and may be it will help.
Take care.
It's, again, Dawda Singhateh.




------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 10:02:42 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <01bcf0cb$4dc33f80$d52185c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Well,maybe the Quote in question should not be the 'Quote Of The Day' in a
largely Black Forum like Gambia-L,but ,at the same time,it could be argued
that since every text is capable of being Narrowly or Broadly
interpreted,Mr.Jallow should be given the benefit of the doubt here.

>From first glance,the quote seems to mean that Talent and Success are the
exception and not the rule among blacks,so that blacks endowed with such
qualities lose their blackness and acquire
Whiteness,albeit a superficial one,since there will always be a point
beyond which whites will not accept even the most talented black person.This
of course is the narrow interpretation.

But in,No Longer At Ease,Achebe has taught us how almost impossible it
becomes for our elites to become really black again once they have acquired
everything there is to be acquired from the white education system and
culture whose dreams and aspirations are almost inimical to those of the
blacks.This kind of situation leaves our elites in a sort of Psychological
Limbo,because ,on the one hand, they can never be white because of their
skin colour,and ,on the other,they can never be really black again because
of their white dreams,aspirations and lifestyle.In short,no longer at ease
in living in either communities,black or white.

This to my mind,is the kind of interpretation on Mr.Jallow's mind when he
sent us a Quote that on the surface looked like an insult to blackness.


Regards
Bassss!


-----Original Message-----
From: D. Singhateh <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Saturday, November 15, 1997 12:18 PM
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY


> Hello Moe,
> I wonder where you got the audacity to defend your actions. I
>think Jainaba was right by any standard. I think we all need to exercise
>caution when we send something out for all to read. I don't know what
>you were thinking when you posted that posting, but it sure ruined my day.
>I have never felt so low about myself for a long time. What even amasses
>me most was the name you gave to it: "QUOTE OF THE DAY". I read this so
>call "QUOTE OF THE DAY" when I was just getting ready to go to lab about
>6hrs ago. I wanted to reply then but time was not on my side. I am glad
>though, when I got the chance to do so, somebody already did. I just
>could not stop thinking about it and I thought I will be better off to
>vent my frustration out. As far as I am concern, when this quote was made
>does not excuse the use of it on this list, and for tiger wood been a
>prominent golfer in an all white sport, I just cannot see the connection.
>I think we all need to be a little more responsible with our postings. As
>the old adage goes: "a journalist's pen is more dangerous than a gun".
>True or not is immaterial. I just want a foundation for my argument and
>to draw a link. By any stretch of imagination, you would not meet
>somebody in the street, slap him and erupt a fight. All over the world
>conflicts, by any measure, start with irresponsible comments. Yes this is
>a democratic society and yes we are all entitle to our opinion and yes, by
>the same token, I reserve the right not to be insulted on a forum like
>this. No offence intended mister and I am not trying to belittle you, I am
>just overwhelmed with emotions. For one of my brothers to make such
>remarks, does not matter the original author, was beyond the realm of my
>comprehension. I think we all deserve a big apology printed in bold to
>help heal the wounds.
>Thanx.
>Dawda Singhateh.
>
>
>
>On Fri, 14 Nov 1997, Modou Jallow wrote:
>
>> Sister Jainaba,
>>
>> I apologize if you found the quote offensive. I have no criteria for
>> selecting a particular quote of the DAY. I randomly select one from a
list
>> of quotes that I have come across on that particular day.
>>
>> Rest assured there's no harm taken; it will take more than a blow on the
>> head to get me offended. Besides, life would be very empty if one had
>> nothing to regret. But remember this is a quote that was made in the
>> 1950'S. Surely, you will agree with me that to to have been the first
>> black ballerina to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in 1951 would not
>> have been an easy task.
>>
>> Now let me ask you: how would you have responded if you were the first
>> black at an all white sport in white America?
>>
>> Perhaps, Tiger Woods can help you answer that.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Moe S. Jallow
>>
>>
>>
>> > Sir,
>> >
>> > If I may ask, what is your criteria for choosing a particular quote as
>> > being that of the week. I think the piece below is a piece of crap!!!
>> > (no pun intended....afterall you are not Janet Collins).
>> >
>> > You probably need to read it over a few more times if you wanna see my
>> > point.
>> >
>> > Cheers,
>> >
>> > Jainaba.
>> > > " WHEN YOU GET TO BE AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK,
>> > > YOU DON'T BELONG TO THE WHITE AND YOU
>> > > DON'T BELONG TO THE BLACK. YOU ARE TOO
>> > > GOOD FOR THE BLACK AND YOU WILL ALWAYS
>> > > BE BLACK TO THE WHITE "
>> > > - Janet Collins.
>> >
>> >
>> > ______________________________________________________
>> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>> >
>>
>>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 23:08:12 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: White sports in White America....
Message-ID: <19971115070813.22107.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

WHITE SPORTS IN WHITE AMERICA...WHERE ARE MY PEOPLE????

I woke up early that faithful day. After starving for several hours, the
doorbell finally rang and the pizza man delivered. BBQ chicken wings and
some pizza (yeah!! I like cheese in the crust) finally joined me. I
dashed to the fridge to see what is in there to wash down the pizza. Oh
no!!! Damn....Budweiser, how did it get there? Oh well, since I was in a
happy mood, I didn't care...I'll drink anything. I dived into the pizza,
guzzled the budweiser as I cheered on. It was more of an amusing
spectacle for I didn't really care about the participants, or the
"sport" for that matter. Yet it gave me something to do on a rainy day
in beautiful Vancouver. I just sat down eating chicken and pizza,
occasionally licking my fingers and watched golf! Yes. Yes, I said
golf!!! So you thought it was soccer????

I've often wondered who came up with the "sport" of golf. I never quite
got into it. I didn't care about or for Tiger Woods. He's some kid
making so much money...while I am a poor full-time student. Who gives a
hoot. What I liked was the fact that despite the fact that once upon a
time in the good old US of A, seeing a black person who was not a caddy
on a golf course was like seeing a normal LaToya Jackson. Wow, a black
man is really kicking ass on national tv... on a golf course. Hey, I
need another budweiser to celebrate Mannn!!! Yes Mannn!!! Tiger won the
championship (the Augusta masters) and was told to prepare some good
collard greens, chicken etc..(soul food..yeah, I think that was what the
dude was refering to) when he takes the participants of next years
masters out. BTW, have you folks seen Soul Food (the movie) yet??? I
think it is the best black movie ever produced...bold statement, but
hey it's from the soul Mannn!!! O.K, Okay back to sports.

Some things we are just not accustomed to. Golf, for all intents
and purposes, has been sold as a "white sport." Ice Hockey, one
can understand. But golf has never been deemed a legit sport by
true sports buffs. Then again, being a sportsman has little to
do with being an athlete, so one can understand it's status.

So I thought and I thought and I thought. Why are there black sports
and white sports? What are the black sports? Basketball is one of
them. It's dominated by blacks. That's a fact. What are the white
sports? Hockey is one of them. It's dominated by whites. That's a
fact. There are several in-between sports, such that reflect the
idealistic "melting pot" theory of America. You know, like Football.
Yeah, football, were a black quarterback who wins the Heissman trophy
has a greater chance of being drafted into the NBA if he has basketball
skills than being drafted into the NFL. Charlie Ward of the Knicks
readily comes to mind.

FOLKS HERE's THE REAL DEAL...
The historical basis for many of these sports will explain why
some are dominated by one ethnic group. Take for instance hockey.
A bunch of white men chasing a black puck, with sticks. Sound
familiar? How about bungee jumping? Tie a rope around a person
and toss them down? Sound familiar? Ever see a black person bungee
jump (mindful of his history) and not be nervous? Man, these people
perfected that "sport" on us, now you expect us to bungee jump? How
about horseback riding? Let's not even go there. Shall we continue?
Going for a walk in the woods, Sailing (a la the America's cup). I'm
sure you see where this is going. Sailing, sailing, that's why there are
black people here in north america in the first place. And do you ever
see a black man in the American swim team (at the olympics)? Shoot, if
we could swim we wouldn't be here no how. You know?

So go ahead Mr. Tiger Woods. I don't know you, and probably never will.
Don't know what you stand for, probably don't care. I have
my own troubles to deal with. But every now and then, when I turn on
the TV and see a black man kicking ass on a golf course--the last
physical bastion of the supremacist mentality (we'll get to the
economics one day), then its okay with me.

Cheers,

Jainaba.

P.S: Brother Moe, I do enjoy reading your postings...the the last one
was however, kind of ....anyways lets move on. As our mutual brother in
the land of the black gold would say "Keep up the good work down there"

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 23:32:02 PST
From: "Jainaba Diallo" <jai_diallo@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fwd: HUM: A Skin Transplant (**1/2)
Message-ID: <19971115073202.24694.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Are you always fighting (not physically) with your mother-in-law?? You
may not be alone.

The piece below is from the Oracle Humornet...their webpage is:

http://oraclehumor.com

Cheers,

Jainaba.
**********************************************************************

>There was a married couple who were in a terrible accident. The
>woman's face was burned severely. The doctor told the husband they
>couldn't graft any skin from her body because she was so thin. The
>husband then donated some of his skin...
>
>However, the only place suitable to the doctor was from his >buttocks.
The husband requested that no one be told of this, because >after all
this was a very delicate matter!
>
>After the surgery was completed, everyone was astounded at the >woman's
new beauty. She looked more beautiful than she ever did >before! All her
friends and relatives just ranted and raved at her >youthful beauty!
>
> She was alone with her husband one day & she wanted to thank him for
>what he did. She said, "Dear, I just want to thank you for >everything
you did for me! There is no way I could ever repay you!!!
>
>He replied, "Oh don't worry, Honey, I get plenty thanks enough every
>time your mother comes over and kisses you on your cheek!!"
>
>
> http://oraclehumor.com


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 10:13:56 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new members
Message-ID: <19971115091525.AAA26136@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Gambia-l,
Fafanding Fatajo, Ebrima Jobe and Mustapha Fanneh have all been added
to the List. Welcome to our Gambian Bantaba in Cyberspace, we look
forward to your contributions.

Please send a brief introduction. Our address is
gambia-l@u.washington.edu

Momodou Camara



*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 08:59:12 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: QUOTE OF THE DAY
Message-ID: <9711151359.AA11870@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Small picture to say "I apologize to all of you".

.' '.
: :
| _ _ |
.-.|(o)(o)|.-.
( ( | .--. | ) )
'-/ ( ) \-'
/ '--' \
\ `""` /
`\ /'
`\ /'
_/`-.-`\_
_..:;\._/V\_./:;.._
.'/;:;:;\ /^\ /:;:;:\'.
/ /;:;:;:;\| |/:;:;:;:\ \
/ /;:;:;:;:;\_/:;:;:;:;:\ \





Good morning people,

It has come to my attention that the last QUOTE OF THE DAY I sent to the
list was offensive to some list members.

Rather than defend my act, I would like to start my day by apologizing to
all of you, whether or not you were offended. I hope that you will agree
with me that it is not always easy to walk in our house full of people
without stepping on some toes, especially if they all have different shoe
sizes. Nonetheless, my intention was not to offend anyone of you as I
also have both friends and relatives who mean very much to me on Gambia-L.
Therefore, the last thing I would like to do is to offend any member of
the Gambia-L list. In this regard, I will not be posting any more QUOTES
OF THE DAY but will continue to be an active participant. So please, let's
all put this behind us and move on (just like I'm headed to the Gym :-)).

Thank you and like brother NJagga would say, "keep a smile on your face".

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

PS
Bass, thank you for very much for seeing eye-to-eye.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 09:04:42 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: White sports in White America....
Message-ID: <9711151404.AA26364@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Thank you sister Jainaba. I enjoyed reading it and i will try to do a
better job next time.

Cheers to you too.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


>
> WHITE SPORTS IN WHITE AMERICA...WHERE ARE MY PEOPLE????

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 12:44:01 -0500 (EST)
From: Musa Sowe <chemsm@panther.Gsu.EDU>
To: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
Cc: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>, ;
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95.971115124125.20232A-100000@panther.Gsu.EDU>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Malanding or anyone else who may be close to this family or case:

Is there any support system (account etc...) set up to assist this
lady's family here in the U.S? If so who is the contact person?

Musa






On Thu, 13 Nov 1997, Malanding S. Jaiteh wrote:

> It is reported that A Gambian lady residing in Silver Spring Maryland
> was this morning found murdered in her apartment aledgedly by her Gambian
> husband.
>
> Malanding Jaiteh
>


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 13:14:06 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Tragic death of a Gambian lady
Message-ID: <199711151814.NAA23505@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

>
>
> Malanding or anyone else who may be close to this family or case:
>
> Is there any support system (account etc...) set up to assist this
> lady's family here in the U.S? If so who is the contact person?
>
> Musa

Yes there is a support system neighbors and friends of the deceased
initiated. The sister is the contact person and can be reached at
(301) 603 0147. There is a post office box that has been set up for
those sending contributions. It is expected that an account no. will
be given by Monday Nov 17.

Until then the P.O address is in the name of the deceased:


Agie Sowe
P.O. Box 5370
Rockville
MD 20848


Malanding Jaiteh





------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 13:37:29 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <199711151837.NAA23601@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Moe Jallow wrote:

>
> Folks,
>
> The husband is indeed the suspect!
>
> I just now spoke with Ms. Fatou Sowe, the sister of the deceased, who
> informed me that there is no doubt the husband killed the wife. She told
> me that she left them at the apartment and when she came back the husband
> was gone and his briefcase (which was always in the house) was missing.
> The wife's corpse was found hidden under the bed. Police are still
> investigating the murder. The husband's name is Momodou Lamarana Jallow.
>

> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow

The latest on the issue is that the Police confirmed that the lady
had been stangled and the the husband is wanted for first degree
murder.

Witness lso confirmed that he travelled to New York two days prior
to the killing. Perhaps looking for a way out (speculation on my
part).

Malanding Jaiteh.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 18:30:32 -0500 (EST)
From: BAKSAWA@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Alieu Badara Jallow
Message-ID: <971115183032_1502620288@mrin46.mail.aol.com>

Dear List Members:


The above named Gambian is currently in a comma, and hooked on a life support
system in Overlandpark, Kansas. The doctors have pronounced him
"brain-dead", and the life support system is expected to be disconnected on
Monday, November 17, 1997. The family's wish is to transport the corpse to
The Gambia. Donations of any kind are critically needed at this time. You
may contact:

Momodou Sireh Jallow (Alieu's younger brother)
and
Rose Oshaia
at
ADDRESS: 5606 Floyd, #1A
Overlandpark, Kansas 66202
TELEPHONE: (913) 262-4778

Alieu is the son of Ndey Jeng and Ousainou Jallow - originally from Basse,
Upper River Division, but currently living in the Serrekunda area.

Thanks in advance for your help.


Awa Sey

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 15 Nov 1997 20:21:39 -0800
From: Compaq Customer <seela@oz.net>
To: "'GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List'"
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: FW: Tragic death of =
Message-ID: <01BCF204.27598360@sense-sea-pm8-19.oz.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Assalamaleykum Brothers & sisters .
First of all I'd like to send my condoleances to the family & sister of =
the young lady whose life was abruptly cut short in some unclear =
circumstances. I pray that the ALMIGHTY ,the MERCIFUL accepts her soul =
in his eternal paradise.
My name is CHEIKH FATY I am a list member for a long period of time and =
as it is well put I belong to the group of the silent participant. I am =
also the president of the SENE-GAMBIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE STATE OF =
WASHINGTON.
I decided to send this post to bring my modest contribution & =
suggestions to the members of this group about these tragic events that =
are unfortunately hitting hard our community almost quite frequently if =
I can put it that way.
Some time ago MR KAMARA sent a post explaining in full detail the =
importance & benefits of such insurance ,but to my knowledge there was =
no follow-up or inquiry about it from the group.
Now I'm again bringing the same issue to the table so that we can have a =
serious debate or discussion on this matter.
Our association is a living proof that it can be done because we have =
successfully registered all our members for a $ 10.000 each in the event =
of death 'accident ,loss of sight you name it for a monthly premium of =
$4.50 .
Presently we are talking to the insurance company to expand the same =
coverage to members who are residing outside of washington state,but we =
were asked to have our potentiel members to be organised in a group of =
100 or combined in neighboring states area.
That way they'll be willing to contact you directly & give you all =
details & benefits from the horse mouth.
I think it's time for us to take our responsibiilties in dealing with =
these death & accidents issues in such a way that it won't be a =
financial burden to the family of the victim or the community members .
Let me know about your thoughts & interests ,then we can setup something =
& have it working for the benefits of all of us.
Sorry I was too long but I had to put the word out.
Ps :THE INSURANCE WAS OBTAINED THROUGH an umbrella organisation called =
OAA (ORGANISATION OF AFRICAN ORGANISTIONS) under the leadership of its =
president DR SHEIKH GIBRIL KAMARA...... WASSALAMM ALLAHOU AKBAR .ALBARKA =20
=20
FATY...
?????????????????????

-----Original Message-----
From: Malanding S. Jaiteh [SMTP:msjaiteh@mtu.edu]
Sent: Saturday, November 15, 1997 10:37 AM
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
Subject: Re: Tragic death of =3D

Moe Jallow wrote:
>=20
> Folks,
>=20
> The husband is indeed the suspect!
>=20
> I just now spoke with Ms. Fatou Sowe, the sister of the deceased, who
> informed me that there is no doubt the husband killed the wife. She =
told
> me that she left them at the apartment and when she came back the =
husband
> was gone and his briefcase (which was always in the house) was =
missing.
> The wife's corpse was found hidden under the bed. Police are still
> investigating the murder. The husband's name is Momodou Lamarana =
Jallow.=20
>=20

> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow

The latest on the issue is that the Police confirmed that the lady had =
been stangled and the the husband is wanted for first degree murder.
Witness lso confirmed that he travelled to New York two days prior to =
the killing. Perhaps looking for a way out (speculation on my part).=20
Malanding Jaiteh.



------------------------------

End of GAMBIA-L Digest 94
*************************
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