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Momodou



Denmark
11550 Posts

Posted - 01 Aug 2021 :  15:47:44  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
GAMBIA-L Digest 92

Topics covered in this issue include:

1) Re: commendations>>>>>>
by "Alpha Robinson" <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
2) RE: Thanx for your consideration!
by KARAMBA CEESAY <kceesay@utmem1.utmem.edu>
3) STILL IN TOWN
by MJagana@aol.com
4) Re: new member
by ARDOPADEL@aol.com
5) Re: BACK TO BUSINESS
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
6) Re: Casamance
by mmjeng@image.dk
7) Re: BACK TO BUSINESS
by Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
8) NEW MEMBER
by Fafa Sanyang <fsanyang@is2.dal.ca>
9) Re:A Nation In Serious Trouble
by KTouray@aol.com
10) When The Cock Crows
by mmjeng@image.dk
11) Greetings
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
12) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by Musa Sowe <chemsm@panther.Gsu.EDU>
13) new member
by Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
14) Greetings
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
15) Re: Yusupha Jatt "Payus"
by badjie karafa sw <badjiek@unixg.ubc.ca>
16) New York Times: Cameroon's Bamoun Guard a Rich Intellectual
Legacy
by Francis Njie <c3p0@xsite.net>
17) Re: Yusupha Jatt "Payus"
by badjie karafa sw <badjiek@unixg.ubc.ca>
18) Re: commendations>>>>>>
by Abdou Gibba <Abdou.Gibba@smr.uib.no>
19) Attempted Coup in Zambia???
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
20) Renting a car in Gambia
by Andy Lyons <alyons@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
21) SV: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
22) Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
by Andrea Klumpp <klumpp@kar.dec.com>
23) Re: Gambia-Lers in the Bay Area
by EStew68064@aol.com
24) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
25) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
26) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
27) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
28) Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
29) Yusupha Jatta "Payus"
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
30) Ouijimai
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
31) Re: Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
32) Re: Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
33) Privatisation pays off BIG TIME
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
34) Re: Privatisation pays off BIG TIME
by "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
35) WORLD BANK scholarships (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
36) DV-99 VISA LOTTERY (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
37) Scholarship for Sub-Saharan African (fwd)
by ndeye marie <njie.1@osu.edu>
38) new member
by Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
39) A DEAL for the ATLANTANS
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
40) Fwd: why Black men love Black women (fwd)
by Paul Jammeh <st2063@student-mail.jsu.edu>
41) new member
by "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
42) Re: new member
by Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
43) new member
by "Omar Gassama" <kassama@hotmail.com>
44) New members
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
45) Ethnicity and Identity
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
46) Nat Res Management Position
by "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
47) Darboe visits Atlanta
by Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
48) Re: new member
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
49) Re: new member
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
50) Town meeting in Atlanta
by Mamadi Corra <MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU>
51) Darboe's meeting in Atlanta
by "Pa-Mambuna O. Bojang" <paomar@iglou.com>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Oct 1997 14:24:08 + 0200 MET
From: "Alpha Robinson" <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: commendations>>>>>>
Message-ID: <407AAAB5289@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-transfer-encoding: Quoted-printable

Mr. Jagne wrote:

> this brings up something to my mind... when the Senegambian
> confederation broke up, PDOIS 'S criticism of Jawara surprised
> me. i though they should have known better. Diouf suceeeded
> in what his mentor failed Senegal was virtually ruling the
> gambia with the agreement (in the conf. constitution) that only
> the Senegalese head of state could be the cofederation
> leader. i agree jawara had his interests in mind when he
> negotiated with Diouf to restore him. when he finally amnaged
> to undo his error i placing the gambia in the hands of
> senegal, PDOIS should have given him credit. just because of
> that, i became cynnical of their teachings.........am i
> running off?? maybe i should pursue that some other time.
> ****************************

Mr. Jagne, it is very dangerous to state half truths and deduce half
baked conclusions. PDOIS has worked very diligently and objectively in
exposing the monster in the Senegambia Confederation and they
certainly deserve more than such unfounded accusations based on a
rather superficial analysis. I would like to refer you to publications
by FOROYAA on the Senegambia Confederation before you "pursue that
some other time". Find out about the truth before you make any
judgements! PDOIS has produced written materials,Cassettes, addressed
the Senegambia issue in local languages in rallies held all over the
country in order to clarify the situation for the Gambian people.

It is the tradition of PDOIS that after addressing issues in their
rallies they invite people from the audience to confront them with a
counter argument should they find their analysis wrong. Likewise PDOIS
always invites other opinions and criticism. in good faith.

You will do well to learn that PDOIS was the FIRST to declare that the
Senegambia Confederation had come to an end. This bears testimony to
the fact that PDOIS was well informed. It would therefore be
irrational for well informed intelligent people who have decided to
stay in their country, ready to take risks, to take decisions which
are counter productive as you seem to be asserting. And certainly
PDOIS cannot be accused by any sane informed Gambian of having ever
been involved in cheap politics.

PDOIS is certainly in a position to defend itself better, so I would
suggest that you send them a copy of your analysis when you address
this issue later. If you are a fair minded person interested in the
truth you will agree that those who are being judged should be kept
aware and given a chance to respond. Here is FOROYAA=92s address:
FOROYAA@COMMITT.GM. If you need any assistance in getting in touch
please do not hesitate to contact me at:
GAROB1@CIP.HX.UNI-PADERBORN.DE

On another note I would like to make the following observation:
Any fair minded person should learn to acknowledge the positive
aspects of a person or group of people, even if you do not agree with
their ideas. The fact is that while you and I are here sitting on our
"safe cushions" PDOIS has shunned all privileges in the interest of
the Gambian people. Those brothers and sisters have dedicated their
whole life to the struggle of the ordinary down-trodden Gambian. Some
of them could have been professors, officers in international
organisations, ambassadors, ministers etc. if they wanted to. They
have evolved to be the most enlightened, dedicated reliable
progressive force in the Gambia. They have been imprisoned by Jawara
and later dismissed from their jobs. They were the very first
political victims of Jammeh, when Jawara fled from the country,
Sherrif Dibba went on holiday and all the other politicians preferred
to save their skins. Yet they never failed to raise the banner of
freedom at the hour of need at their own risk.

PDOIS is a party without any sponsor at all, the only party of its
kind in the Gambia. They have learnt to cater for their own collective
survival on the very principle which they preach, " self reliance".
Their newspaper provides very accurate analysis of the political,
economic and social situation in the Gambia. They have established a
nursery school which even accommodated children of people in high
offices in the Jawara days just to name a few things.

So these are men and women of integrity. Learn from them if you can or
disagree with them, but do not stab them on the back.

You may wonder why I have taken the trouble to write about PDOIS.
Well, first because not everyone on this list is fully aware of who
PDOIS really is. Secondly, it is very common to hear learned Gambians
paint such a false picture of that Party. I guess this lies partly in
the fact that African intellectuals are not used to a humble
leadership, but certainly part of the answer lies in our often
unquestioned irrational castigation of socialism, which is the
ideology of PDOIS. Perhaps it is time that we learn to listen
objectively even if we disapprove.

Let me conclude by saying that it has never been my interest to sound
like a political campaigner of PDOIS on the list, just in case it may
smell so. I am very aware of the humble nature of PDOIS who would
rather do the right things without making much noise about it, but
somehow I felt like making these points clear.

Regards,

Alpha Robinson



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Oct 1997 20:34:18 -0600 (CST)
From: KARAMBA CEESAY <kceesay@utmem1.utmem.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L-owner <GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu>,
gambia-l <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Thanx for your consideration!
Message-ID: <2018341526101997/A67481/UTMEM2/11BAD3E21000*@MHS>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII

Sir:
Morro K. Ceesay is currently trying to set up his law firm in Minneapolis, MN. The firm is scheduled to
open the first week of Nov. I guess he should be on board after settling down.

K. J. Ceesay


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Oct 1997 20:40:21 -0500 (EST)
From: MJagana@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: STILL IN TOWN
Message-ID: <971026203932_-1642234949@emout04.mail.aol.com>



Dear List Managers,

I had one too many friends who misunderstood a message I sent earlier. Can I
kindly restate that I shall not unsubscibre because of any personal comments
between list memebers.

So I am still in town, will be in town and shall be in town.

ALLAH BLESS US ALL

MOMODOU JAGANA

"THE MIND IS AN ENDANGERED SPECIES
PLEASE KEEP IT ALIVE
READ A BOOK"


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Oct 1997 23:31:43 -0500 (EST)
From: ARDOPADEL@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: SANG1220@aol.com
Subject: Re: new member
Message-ID: <971026233021_443854828@emout07.mail.aol.com>

Greetings to all

My
name is Philip Sowe, am staying in Marylang, this is to Introduce myself to
the Bantaba, am also Thanking Sang and Latjor for Introducing me .


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 24 Oct 1997 10:14:05 +0100
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: BACK TO BUSINESS
Message-ID: <B0000012778@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


Hi Mr Saho or is it Dr Saho??
anyway, I am just curious, is the Too Bad ...Too Bab
or TouBab a joke, I am of the belief that centuries of inter-mingling with
alien cultures, a most natural but in our case unsavoury process, have
resulted in the increasing loss of our language..I hold that TOUBAB and
TOUGAL are respectively our native words for European and Europe, just like
Honha is red, Weh is white etc...just what I thought
please educate me otherwise

pmj----------
on a serious tip


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 12:04:45 +2000
From: mmjeng@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Casamance
Message-ID: <199710271105.MAA21188@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

I saw the following from the point newspaper and though it might be
of intrest.
Greetings,
Matarr M. Jeng.


Senegal And (3iambia


The recent meeting between Senegalese and Gambian security services
was the culmination of earlier meetings on the security along the
boundaries of the countries and other related problems.
Although the emphasis was laid on organiscd actions the allusion is
clear,
the two sides seemed ready to collaborate against destabilising
eternents.
The Senegalcse are presently faced with the escalation of the
conflict in
Casamance and The Gambia had faced not long ago two attacks(Fanfenni
and Kartong) purportedly originating from Senegal. The allusion then
seemed clear but what was no so clear was the operatives which were
vaguely de- scribed in the form of more concerted efforts between
security and judiciary o~ficials.
The proposed fight against drug and narcotics trafficking was also
identi-
~ed as maybe a new area that deserves the attention ot' the two
countries.
The teal innovation seems to have been the indusion of cooperation
be-
tween the two judicial systems. It would seem that one should not rule
out that extradition was the main consideration behind this
development.
Whatever the case, the Gambian interior Minister was right to say
that
peace in Senegal means peace in The Gatnbia and vice versa.




------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 12:34:52 +0100 (MET)
From: Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: BACK TO BUSINESS
Message-ID: <199710271134.MAA17705@online.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello Pmj

You wrote "I am just curious, is the Too Bad ...Too Bab
>or TouBab a joke, I am of the belief that centuries of inter-mingling with
>alien cultures," Whether it=B4s a joke or not i don=B4t know i was just
contributing to the trivia question. BTW i wrote "A.K. Njai=B4s narration
reminds me of an explanation i heard when i was younger concerning the word
TOUBAB which means whiteman" I believe that many of us has heard story
telling from our grand, parents, parents or elderly nneighbours. You have
already educated me.


Omar=20

At 10:14 24.10.97 +0100, you wrote:
>Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
>Hi Mr Saho or is it Dr Saho??
>anyway, I am just curious, is the Too Bad ...Too Bab
>or TouBab a joke, I am of the belief that centuries of inter-mingling with
>alien cultures, a most natural but in our case unsavoury process, have
>resulted in the increasing loss of our language..I hold that TOUBAB and
>TOUGAL are respectively our native words for European and Europe, just like
>Honha is red, Weh is white etc...just what I thought
>please educate me otherwise
>
>pmj----------
>on a serious tip
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 08:46:26 -0400 (AST)
From: Fafa Sanyang <fsanyang@is2.dal.ca>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: NEW MEMBER
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.95.971027084146.253188C-100000@is2.dal.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Hello Gambia-l,

Mr. ADAMA B. CHAM of Reading University U.K. would like to be enlisted.
His address is as follows:

A,cham@reading.ac.uk
Thanks
Fafa Sanyang


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 12:45:53 -0500 (EST)
From: KTouray@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:A Nation In Serious Trouble
Message-ID: <971027124300_1311692186@emout05.mail.aol.com>

With a growing population that is over a million people, a towering foreign
debt the servicing of which is requiring almost close to half of the entire
budget, a shrinking and weak economy that creates almost no jobs, what is a
nation to do? First here are some basic facts:

1-The government being the largest employer in the nation has about 15000
people on its payroll.
2-The formal private sector by the governments own account is significantly
less than half of the number on government rolls
3-That in theory means only a very tiny percentage of our people can count on
a regular pay of some sort hence enabling them to buy the goods and services
necessary to survive. The rest of the country is mired in excruciating
poverty living on no steady income , but constantly skimping and foraging
each day.

No one can be accused of exaggeration for saying that we won't be a viable
nation if current trends continue. We risk becoming a hungry backwater of a
nation with no hope of standing on its feet unless we immediately embark on a
three- pronged strategy that in my view would go a long way in redefining our
nation and set it on a course that may provide hope. On their face these
ideas may seem simplistic and wishful but i believe if they are well thought
out they can make a difference. The first strategy would be aimed out our
outstanding debt which has become so burdensome that we can neither afford
the current schedules for payment nor do we have any hope of ever settling
them in their entirity. I know these are legittimately incurred debts for
which we are obligated but I believe the government has to put together an
honest and very convincing position to those governments and lending
institutions we owe essentially asking for the monies owed to be retired in
return for a clearly spelt out agenda that is grounded on very sound policies
that would be stringently monitored by both donors and creditors. This is by
no means an easy proposition, it must be sound, comprehensive and plausible
and involving credible lobbying. It cannot succeed in a vacum either. It
would mean structuring our foreign policy to forge alliances with those
countries whose support would be crucial . To bolster it's position for the
debt forgiveness the gov't should clearly state it's committment to focus
on identified areas of it's economy and use every butut saved directly to
these areas in a way that is both verifiable and whose progress can be
constantly measured. To this end the gov't should identify education ,
tourism and the developmentof the reexport trade infrastruture as being the
core of it's revitilisation plan. I think gov't should commit to spending
upto 30% of gdp upon debt relief for the first ten years on education. This
may sound astronomical but it would lay a very strong foundation for the
coming generation who would be both better educated and in larger numbers
giving us the required talent pool that can help us attract small and light
industry. As things are the moment we would be hard pressed to provide enough
people for a nut and bolt manufacturer or shoe maker because we are an
uneducated country for the most part. Unless we make education our number one
priority we will not succeed. Our tourism industry is nowhere near it's
potential either. The government would have to draw up a comprehensive plan
that would be aimed at growing the industry by agressively seeking investors
both for new and existing hotels and tour package operators through generous
incentives that might be expensive at the start but would payoff in the long
term. Tourism is an industry that requires constant nurturing and aggressive
marketing to grow otherwise visitors get wooed to otherplaces.

I strongly believe we can successfully pull our proposals through if we
construct our ideas on solid policies that would translate to better
conditions and enable us to participate in the global economy. Afterall the
nations we owe are very much interested in nations that are financially sound
and hence are inclined to consider ideas that may result in real change in
the never ending cycle of debt-ridden nations being the constant drain to the
global econmy.



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 18:54:35 +2000
From: mmjeng@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: When The Cock Crows
Message-ID: <199710271754.SAA18360@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

ARE YOU HOMESICK AGAIN????????????
YES IAM. HOW ABOUT UUUUUUUU??
The following is my (home sick ) poem. I read it whenever I feel home
sick. It helps.

Greetings,
Matarr M. Jeng.


When the cock Crows

When the cock crows
early in the morning
I think of you, my country
when the sun rises
I see the sky shining
I hear the birds singing
I feel the winds moving
when the cock crows
early in the morning
noises from the compound arise
the women go feching water
preparing the baths
pounding the rice for breakfast
the men lead the morning prayers
then all say salamalekum
as custom and traditional bid
when the cock crows
early in the morning
I think of you, my country.


When the sun is hot
in the middle of the day
people are walking and working
sweating and burning
chewing and spitting
eating and drinking
quarrelling and joking
when the sun is hot
in the middle of the day
I think of you, my country


When the sun goes down
colouring the sky
women back from work
in the rice fields
prepare bennachine or chou
and men back from work
in the groundnuts farms
enjoy the family gathering
when the sun goes down
colouring the sky
I think of you, my country

When the moon and stars are out
in the black velvet sky
women in coloured dresses
some carrying babies on their backs
sing with their golden voices
dance to the men `s beating of the drums
some are filling the bantabas
some the open-air cinemas
and some men and women
young and old, boys and girls
are gathering in jokes and games
stories and tales
brewing and stirring the green tea

When the moon and stars are out
in the black velvet sky
when the moon shines on the sea
and the stars sparkle like diamonds
in the black velvet sky
when the moon and stars shine
on the white sanded beach
I think of you, my country.

Matarr M. Jeng.
April, 1977





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 13:00:42 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Greetings
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971027122103.30220B-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

whats up evebo wa?
I am glad to be back after a long hiatus. I was
offline for quite a while due to some technical difficulties with my
account. I hope to contribute and participate in the stimulating and
interlectual discourse that I so dearly missed.

Si Jamaa,
Daddy Njie.




------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 18:33:45 -0500 (EST)
From: Musa Sowe <chemsm@panther.Gsu.EDU>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95.971027180012.7276A-100000@panther.Gsu.EDU>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Jabou:

That is a wonderful offer from Ten State and we should do
everything we can not to pass it up, instead to grab it and maximize it.
I am kind of dissapointed since this idea of supporting Gambian Education
came up, one brilliant idea comes up only to get buried by another
brilliant idea and as a collective we have not done anything concrete yet.
I am passionate and strong about us supporting Gambia College for
the same reasons that I have mentioned before: The college trains all
Gambian teachers (elementary and secondary level and even HTC candidates
some of whom can teach high school), trains nurses, agricultural
personnel, and community health workers. I can elaborate on this but I
think you got my
point. So I think any one truly interested in enhancing and helping to
develop Gambian education should be primarily involved with Gambia
College. I have been quiet on this issue, at least on Gambian L, because
of heavy teaching load and other responsibilities but also because I have
observed one good idea hailed only to be buried by another good idea that
is hailed for a while and then buried by the next good idea and since we
are all full of good ideas it seems that it is going to be a never ending
cycle. And, because I tend to lean on the practical side more, although I
deal with highly theoretical and abstract subjects at the professional
level, I have decided to go solo on this issue and do the little I can
with Gambia college until something more practical comes up.
I will be glad to be part of you and your friend's endeavour
because I am working on getting my institution to do the same and it is
not very easy. so, if we have this offer we should grab it while it is
hot. I would like to know more about the shipping oppurtunities you
mentioned. I have been using the M bags which are restrictive and not so
cheap. I send small packages by first class which costs me about $40.

ALSO, THE JOINT VENTURE: PLEASE SUGGEST SOMETHING. YOU ARE MUCH MORE
FAMILIAR WITH THINGS BACK HOME THAN I AM. I REALLY WANT TO START
SOMETHING BUT DON'T KNOW WHAT. I HAVE AN ACCOUNT WITH STANDARD BANK IN
BANJUL BUT THEY COULD NOT GIVE ANY ADVICE EITHER. HOPE TO HEAR FROM YOU
SOON THANK YOU. Musa


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 20:42:51 -0500 (EST)
From: Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.971027201039.19914B-100000@acc5>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Greetings:
Adama B. Cham has been added to the list. Welcome and please
send a brief intro. about yourself to our bantaba. Our address
is: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
+++++
Let me say a few other things while I have the opportunity.
Welcome also to all th new members. I just returned from the
D.C. area hence my absence from contributing on the educational,
casamance, senegambia, ... topics. I also add my voice to what Abdou and the
other managers of the list have already stated in reference to
that ugly incident.
'The Art of War' by Sun Tzu (500 b.c.) is an excellent book/guide
for generals Mr. Jawara. However, we must also note that its
applicability is not only in the martial sciences. Fundamental
Taoist philosophy speaks to all aspects of living and as such
ought to be read by economists, businessmen/women, parents,
people in government, etc.
It is unfortunate that since the conquering of the Shang dynasty
which by the way was a Black Chinese Dynasty (1523 - 1028 b.c.),
Chinese philosophical practices began to take on a more
martial attitude. The matriachal structure of their society was
also replaced by a patriarchal one. (One sure indicator of who
is taking over. I wonder if Torstein wants proof of this (smile).
Oh by the way, Torstein, I will supply you with 8000 (no 10 000)
years of references on that 'toubabo hang-up' issue.) My point
though is that if we are going to fight and win wars under
the guidance of Master Sun, then of equal importance, nay of
greater importance is to comprehend the culture and civilization
which nurtured this 'Art of War'. The better for us to add or
reject it from our corporate body of knowledge. After all, we
are seeking peace and harmony - nataange, not war for our dear
beloved motherland.
Excellent pieces Alpha and Sidibeh. Welcome back to the bantaba.

Again glad to be back.

LatJor


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 19:49:21 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Greetings
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971027194624.13578A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Whats up everybody?
I am glad to be back after a long hiatus. I was
offline for quite a while due to some technical difficulties with my
account. I hope to contribute and participate in the stimulating and
interlectual discourse that I so dearly missed.

Si Jamaa,
Daddy Njie.


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 18:43:59 -0800 (PST)
From: badjie karafa sw <badjiek@unixg.ubc.ca>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Yusupha Jatt "Payus"
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95q.971027183633.12472C-100000@netinfo1.ubc.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Barks;

I have my e-mail hours resplinished today and I can now read my messages.
A lot of heat was on the Bantaba during my absence. I was unable to go
read all the postings today. The heat between Ebrima and Jainaba was Gross
and I don't know what you think of it.I think Ebrima got choked and had to
rescued as he was firing sexist statements to stay alive.

Jamoraa!!!!

Karafa

@e,

On Thu, 23 Oct 1997, Paul wrote:

>
> Hi! Payus,
> I posted a reply to your enquiry about me but you never got back to me.
> If at all you got my reply, please get back to me. If you did not, then I
> must tell you that I am the same Bakary Gibba that you referred to
>
> B. Paul Gibba
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 23:25:25 -0600
From: Francis Njie <c3p0@xsite.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New York Times: Cameroon's Bamoun Guard a Rich Intellectual
Legacy
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19971027232525.006b5d60@xsite.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I find the stated indigenous writing system that does not "borrow from
Arabic or Roman characters" rather interesting. I hope the obvious
tardiness of this article mitigates the copyright violation. :-)


October 21, 1997
The New York Times
Journal: Cameroon's Bamoun Guard a Rich Intellectual Legacy
By HOWARD W. FRENCH

OUMBAN, Cameroon -- Surrounded by praise-singers who strive to outdo
one another in chanting his virtues, court attendants who wave fans to
preserve him from the heat and musicians who blow shrill six-foot-long
trumpets toward an incandescent sky, Sultan Ibrahim Mbombo Njoya takes half
an hour to walk the stone's throw from the central mosque to his imposing
palace.

The spectacle is repeated every Friday at the end of the midday
Muslim prayers in this town, tucked in equatorial mountain country where pine
trees outnumber palms. But people of the Bamoun ethnic group still
enthusiastically crowd the path for the entire 200-yard route, bowing or
ululating as their sovereign slowly passes, a serene smile his only
acknowledgment of their salute.

Aside from the introduction of Islam early in this century, the
rituals of the Bamoun people would seem little changed in the 600 years of
recorded history of their royalty. But for many visitors here, what is most
impressive about this culture is not the colorful ceremonies repeated week
after week, or even the longevity of the royal line, but the intellectual and
historical treasures proudly guarded inside the palace.

There, under the impassive gaze of the current sultan's grandfather,
the first King Ibrahim Njoya, who is immortalized in a huge black-and-white
photograph, are housed the achievements of a small but impressive
civilization. These clash sharply with common stereotypes of a continent's
dark and savage history.

By almost any standard, the original Ibrahim Njoya was a Renaissance
man who, Jeffersonlike, drew up plans and oversaw construction of a
three-story mud-brick palace of vaulted ceilings and elaborately engraved
wooden shutters.

Historians say the building was first envisioned in 1904 after King
Njoya visited the German governor's mansion in the coastal city of Buea and
insisted that his culture could produce better.

The cavernous interior, which now serves as a museum, houses King
Njoya's meticulously kept administrative records and legal codes. A poetic
treatise on esthetics providing nearly 200 criteria for appraising the beauty
of women, an elaborate volume on pharmacopoeia and a detailed history of the
Bamoun Kingdom were all written by the ruler.

By itself, the creation of such works in turn-of-the-century
equatorial Africa would be remarkable. But the brightest jewel in the
collection is not a document at all. It is an alphabet and writing system
unique to the Bamoun, who number 570,000.

The first Njoya was born into the Bamoun royal line in 1875. Twenty
years later, when the country that would become known as Cameroon had just
been named a German protectorate, Njoya, responding to a dream, began work on
one of the rare sub-Saharan writing systems that do not borrow from Arabic or
Roman characters. Known as Shumom, it evolved during his 32-year rule from a
sprawling system of ideographs to a concise syllabic alphabet.

As the use of written documents spread, mostly in the court and
administration, Njoya built a printing press, and soon a royal library of
works in Shumom began to grow.

"He was one of the first sub-Saharan Africans to build a museum,"
said Dayirou Ngouchemo, a palace guide. "He created a writing system when he
was 25 years old. This man was a genius to whom Cameroon and Africa owe a
great deal."

Njoya's creations did not escape intact from the colonial collision
of European and African cultures. When France took over most of what is now
Cameroon from a defeated Germany after World War I, the French sought to
impose their language and administration throughout the territory. They were
suspicious of the astute sultan, who they feared might form an alliance with
the part of the country controlled by the British.

It was, inevitably, an uneven match. And although the French
takeover of the Bamoun Kingdom was relatively peaceful, indigenous schools
were destroyed, the printing press was smashed and, in 1931, King Njoya was
exiled to the city of Yaounde, where he died, humiliated, two years later.

"We had our own culture, our own script, our own army and our own
institutions," said Adamou Ndam Njoya, a Cameroonian opposition politician
and lawyer descended from the exiled king. "The Germans didn't have enough
time to destroy our civilization, but when the French arrived, they abolished
everything."

In less than 100 years, from the time of widespread European
penetration to formal colonialism early in the century, similar bouts of
destruction doomed impressive civilizations throughout Africa.

The names of some of the larger nation-states, places like Ashanti,
Benin, Kongo and Dahomey, still carry an echo of grandeur for some. But
outside
a small circle of experts, few are aware of the extent of their
accomplishments
-- from postal systems and tax imposition to uniformed police forces,
diplomats
and courts of law -- or of the violent end they met at the hands of Europeans
with a supposedly civilizing mission.

For many African intellectuals today, there is a bitter twinge of
conjecture that lingers, an eternally unanswerable "what if," that looks at a
continent scarred by misery and war, and asks whether much of Africa would
not be better off if its home-grown institutions had not been destroyed by
outsiders.

As Maurice Tadadjeu, a Cameroonian linguist, put it: "The major
colonial damage is that, after the destruction of what we were building,
Africans were brainwashed to the point where they looked down on their past
as nothing more than backwardness. Why should we even bother with something
like Shumom? It is to remind ourselves that we have many things to be proud
of."

"Believe it or not," he added, "until 1972 we had a national anthem
that said, 'In the time of our ancestors, we lived in barbarism.' "



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 23:17:12 -0800 (PST)
From: badjie karafa sw <badjiek@unixg.ubc.ca>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Yusupha Jatt "Payus"
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95q.971027231250.6200B-100000@netinfo1.ubc.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

The previous posting was intended for Paul but by mistake, it was sent to
the BANTABA.

Karafa

@e,


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 09:58:14 +0000
From: Abdou Gibba <Abdou.Gibba@smr.uib.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: commendations>>>>>>
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19971028095814.008f4a60@golf.uib.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Alpha!

Very articulate piece and indeed very factual. Facts and not fiction are the
only means of problem solution. On the contra, fiction (or may I say "cheap
propaganda" as PDOIS puts it) leads to nothing but the creating of more
problems in a political arena... and for sure, that is the last thing Gambia
needs.

So " keep up the very good work down there".

Best of Regards,
Abdou Oujimai



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 17:56:06 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Attempted Coup in Zambia???
Message-ID: <9710282256.AA65044@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Just as I was thinking how the massacre that happened in Sierra Leone will
discourage further military take-overs in the whole of Africa, some
military thugs decided to stop my thoughts. In Zambia, another coup almost
succeeded today!

Just about three weeks ago, another coup was staged in Congo and the rebel
leader has since declared himself head of state. But unlike Sierra Leone
where African countries are trying to undo the coup, Angola decided to
help the military in Congo to succeed with a coup. Is this the call for
African solutions to African problems?

The coup attempt in Zambia this morning just shows one of the many dangers
posed by the military in Africa. Democracy and stability always fly out
the window when the military emerge. If any military captain can just go
on the air and announce leadership of a whole country whenever he wants,
then we have a very sad situation at hand. Look at the recent takeover in
Sierra Leone, where the Junta has just been granted to rule for another 6
months despite the death of many of their people, and where the entire
professional class had to flee for safety in neighboring countries.

Can this type of barbaric behavior bring development to Africa? How can
potential entrepreneurs like me be convinced that things are really calm
for any kind of business investment? Do we need the military to continue
to dislodge our governments or can the people be allowed to transform
peacefully without military intervention?

For all the politicians out there, you have a big task at hand in
rewriting and implementing the laws that would make the continent a safer
place to live in. And to those who see nothing wrong with living under
military rule, I must say "think again".

It is sad that the military madness for political change in West and
Central Africa is slowly infecting the calmer countries of Southern
Africa? I wonder where the prospect of growth and development really lies.

Oh...AFRICA, when and where is the next coup?

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 19:28:04 -0500
From: Andy Lyons <alyons@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Renting a car in Gambia
Message-ID: <2.2.16.19971029002804.338f2d78@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi. Can anyone on the list help the gentleman below
with his question about renting cars in Gambia?
If so, please respond directly to the author
at gajahdog@tref.nl. Thanks. Andy

===============================================================
Andy Lyons The Gambia Resource Page
alyons@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu http://grove.ufl.edu/~alyons
===============================================================

>Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 13:49:50 -0500 (EST)
>From: Thea Jacobs <gajahdog@tref.nl>
>Subject: Holiday Experiences Message Board
>
>Thea Jacobs has left a comment on the holiday experiences message board.
>
>Here is the new entry:
>Thea Jacobs
>gajahdog@tref.nl
>Leunen, Netherlands
>Hi!
>I am looking for information about renting a car
>in the Gambia and Senegal. Some people I know want
>to travel through the Gambia along the river with a
>rented car and go to Senegal. Does anyone know if this
>is a wise thing to do? Can they spend the night
>
>Please send me an e-mail as soon as possible! Thanks!
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 12:35:48 +0100
From: "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <199710291137.MAA27661@d1o42.telia.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr. Sowe wrote:
.. I have been quiet on this issue, at least on Gambian L, because
> of heavy teaching load and other responsibilities but also because I have
> observed one good idea hailed only to be buried by another good idea that
> is hailed for a while and then buried by the next good idea and since we
> are all full of good ideas it seems that it is going to be a never ending
> cycle.

My belief is that this is a serious but unexpected problem. Since
Torstein Grotnes introduced himself and Commit Ent. and the issue of the
possibility of hooking Gambia College into the net came up, a friend and I
found out, independently of each other, that it is not just a matter of
packaging computers to the college. There are only two or three computers
(Torstein knows) and the one used by Mr. Manneh is a 386 with 4Mb RAM. i.e
a machine that, in today's software market, is barely better than an
advanced typewriter.
Aside from the question of hardware, there is also the additional problem
of getting the students themselves involved in formualting their needs for
computers, which information would dictate the allocation of necessary
software. Somebody with a knowledge of systems set-up would have to get
involved in assessing needs and formulating requirements, and, with the
availaibility of equipment, setting up an operational LAN. In short there
is simply the need of organization. My point is that in order to get things
done on the ground, you need an organisation to carry it out. GAMBIA-L IS
NOT SUCH AN ORGANISATION. Certainly, Gambia-l's managers and the various
committees that sacrifice time and energy to provide us with this wonderful
service have to get organised, in some sense, in order to carry out their
work. But that is not the kind of activity I mean.

To send computers and/or books to Gambia we need to get away from our
keyboards, get out and get the books, parcel them, carry them to the post
office, receive them in Gambia, and distribute them to wherever they should
be distributed to; and somebody or some people should co-ordinate/manage
this process and follow it up as well; and pay the necessary bills all the
way through. If we really want to make a difference in Gambia, this is what
we need to do.

I have realised that our situation or rather our history puts us in this
difficulty. In spite of all our disagreements, the obvious thread running
through the discussions on this list is the desire to make Gambia better
than it has ever been. This desire posits an obvious discrepancy: the
difference between theoretical debates and the practical activity that is
suggested by those debates, especially when that practice has little to do
with our livelihood. Generally we adopt ambivalent attitudes. Recall this:

When it was, at the beginning of the planting season, reported that the
rains refused to rain, and that the plants were sleepy and thirsty, a
flurry of questions were raised. Bass complained that list members at NARI
and NARB and even Torstein were sleeping! They were supposed to feed us
information about the plight of the farmers and they failed to do so
quickly. Somebody (I cannot remember who) had to tell Bass to slow down.
Bass (and many others) I suppose simply forgot that those list members in
Gambia or anywhere else owe no obligations to others. NOBODY IS DUTYBOUND
TO INFORM ANYBODY ABOUT ANYTHING! Or am I wrong???

When a subscriber finished his course from somewhere in the U.K, he
informed us that he was unsubscribing, packing his bags, leaving for
Gambia, and that he was going to work in the economic division of the
education department. Asbjorn Nordam jumps up (out of pure enthusiasm for
activity!) and says something like " our man at the education department".
Of course, we have no man at the D of E!
The above two examples illustrate the cofusion of equating Gambia-l with an
organization that has a constitutionally accepted set of objectives and
codes of conduct that members SHOULD observe.

So fellow netters we either do what we got to do or we dont. Otherwise
we will have a severe case of what Katim referred to as the
analysis-paralysis syndrome. Good ideas about things to be done that get
buried by other good ideas will eventually result in a case of a thing
being its own cause and effect, damaging to both intellectual honesty and
personal integrity. It also does not tell well on the reputation of
Gambia-l. [Cause = Effect : because we say things and dont do them, when a
new thing-to-do comes up we do not do a damn thing because each believes
nothing will be done, so no one does a thing!] Naturally, good ideas may
affect the imaginations of some people who may privately decide to do
something concrete about it in spite of what happens to the issue in
Gambia-l. That is a wonderful thing to happen, but I think the people
concerned could then tell the rest of us that they are moving forward and
doing things so that the rest of us may know that things are going on - in
spite of us!

Sorry for disturbing you once more.

Momodou Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm





------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 14:06:44 +0100
From: Andrea Klumpp <klumpp@kar.dec.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
Message-ID: <345734E4.4221@kar.dec.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I thought this could be of interest for some of you:

Meeting of the Chambers of Commerce of Dakar, Ziguinchor, Kolda, Kaolack
and The Gambia

(Foroyaa/The Gambia) The Chambers of Commerce of Daker, Kaolack, Kolda
and Ziguinchor of the Republic of Senegal and the Chamber of Commerce
and Industry of The Gambia, meeting at the Friendship Hotel, Bakau, made
the following resolutions:

1. Issues relating to the TransGambia Ferry Crossing: When the Gambia
Chamber of Commerce took up this issue with the Gambia Public Transport
Corporation, the latter's position can be summarised as thus:
a) Further reduction in tariff cannot be attained because of the heavy
loss in revenue it will cause to the company.
b) Extension of services from 8.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. will mean a lot of
organisational issues which the company will look into.
c) The company is constrained by its status to accept payments in
dalasis for its operations in The Gambia.
d) GPTC shall endeavour to look into the issue of priority crossing for
the sick, perishable goods, livestock.

2. Solutions to do away with permits and check points: It was agreed
that efforts towards the integration of 120 day permits within the
ECOWAS inter-state transit regime should commence.

3. Reduction of check points: Check points are seen as obstacles to the
free movement of goods and persons. Thus their reduction to a strict
minimum is desirable. They are seen as extra costs and a very burdensome
procedure. Both parties reiterate their opposition to the quota system
and will endeavour to convice their respective governments for the
eliminitaion of quotas for vehicles. Customs representatives from both
countries agreed to enhance transparancy in escort. However the Gambia
Customs representative while agreeing in principle to reduce check
points, also requested transport operators to respect and conform to
regulations in force of the Chambers of Commerce.

4. Implementation of the ECOWAS Inter-state road transit regime: An
approval of a Presidential decree on the 22 August, 1997 creating the
Senegalese guarantee fund. The Dakar Chamber promised the Banjul Chamber
provision of information on any progress made regarding the
implementation of the regime in Senegal.

5. More information exchange and more co-operation among border police
is the only solution to recover stolen livestock. A more sustainable
solution, however, is either to sign a bilateral agreement on this
subject or to adopt the ECOWAS protocols on the matter.

6. The two delegates agreed that the two countries should move towards
the elemination of red tape in the registration of subsidiaries and
congratulated the Chamber of Commerce of Banjul of its diligence of the
registration of BSS, a Senegalese newly registered business in The
Gambia.

9. New issues raised during the Banjul meeting:
a) The exchange of information on sale of company shares in both
countries.
b) The need to modernise information exchange through the use of the
internet.
c) The scope of information sharing notably the need to include tenders,
product range information and financing opportunities.

In conclusion, the five Chambers of Commerce called on economic
operators to have trust and confidence in them. Incidents should be
reported to the Chambers of Commerce who will take up issues with the
relevant authorities.
*******************************
I left the newspaper where I did the typing and can't remember the exact
date of the meeting ... next time ...

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 10:03:10 -0500 (EST)
From: EStew68064@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambia-Lers in the Bay Area
Message-ID: <971029095456_-426169174@emout03.mail.aol.com>

Dear Moe:
I'm so sorry I didn't check my email...you came and left San Francisco and I
could have met you! Maybe next time.
Sincerely Liz Stewart Fatti

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 11:47:45 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <199710291748.LAA16283@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi folks,

here i am with my thoughts on the "Give a book idea":

1. i think it's a great idea. not only is it good, but it also has a
precedent, in the fact that Camerounians launched a successful book drive
for their university in Bamenda or some place like that.

2. with regards how we go about it implementing the idea, i suggest we use
the following format (which i think should be a formula for implementing
others)

a) form a core-group of people who will implement the idea, to be headed if
possible by the person who originated the idea. in the case of the "Give a
Book" idea, Ebrima Sall would spear-head the task, unless of course he has
some pretty good reasons for not wanting to.

b) the core-group will explore the idea further, and come up with an action
plan. the plan will be disseminated as widely as possible through, but not
limited to, Gambia-L.

c) if needed more volunteers will be solicited to help implement the plan

d) a progress report sent out to keep people abreast of developments, and
boost interest in the implementation of the original idea. hopefully,
progress reports will be occassions for making course corrections, and
getting additional feedback.

e) at the conclusion of the project, a final report will be issued.
projects that lead to on-going programs will have to be turned into
institutions or organizations. for example, the "Give a Book" idea might
be turned into a foundation, or a permanent staff postion in The Gambia
College, or National library. either way, the organization or person
concerned will then be handed the task of continuing the program initiated,
after a final report is issued.

f) the core-group can disbanded after the implementation of the idea, or
transfer of responsibilities to the appropriate agency or organization.

3. let me say that people should not be scared of some of the above
proposals. for example, that you might be likely to head the group to
implement your idea should not deter you from sharing your ideas. it will
be terrible if you do that because you would be killing an idea that could
have been implemented by someone else. also, please realize that the
process of seeing your ideas bear fruit can be a very educating experience.
we all stand to learn a lot by working together toward common small goals.

also, when i say progress reports and stuff like that, i'm not thinking of
some highly bureaucratic thing. it would suffice to summarize whatever is
going on in a page or two. this means that reports will be limited to the
bare essentials, forcing us to concentrate on substance. furthermore that
the reports would be short and to the point will imply tremendous savings
in time reading them, and consequently a greater chance of being read. let
us embark on our own paperwork reduction program.

4. applying the above suggestions to the "Give a Book" idea will mean that
we start taking volunteers who would want to join Ebrima Sall to form the
core group to implement it, and they can take the ball and run!

that's about all for now. have a great day!

Katim

----------
> From: Momodou S Sidibeh <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: SV: "Give A Book" : just an idea
> Date: Wednesday, October 29, 1997 5:35 AM
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 15:29:25 -0000
From: "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <B0000013273@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
via Commit


To Gambia-L from Commit Enterprises Ltd.

Momodou S Sidibeh wrote:
>...a friend and I found out, independently of each other, that it is not just a matter of
>packaging computers to the college. There are only two or three computers
>(Torstein knows) and the one used by Mr. Manneh is a 386 with 4Mb RAM. i.e
>a machine that, in today's software market, is barely better than an
>advanced typewriter.
>Aside from the question of hardware, there is also the additional problem
>of getting the students themselves involved in formualting their needs for
>computers, which information would dictate the allocation of necessary
>software. Somebody with a knowledge of systems set-up would have to get
>involved in assessing needs and formulating requirements, and, with the
>availaibility of equipment, setting up an operational LAN. In short there
>is simply the need of organization.
>Momodou Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm

Gambia College does have a problem with their current system and communication.

With the knowledge I have of the situation at the college,
I would split it up in 4 parts:

1) Outdated hardware/software,
2) Lack of computers for students & teachers,
3) No computergroup(organization),
4)No finances available for this kind of investment,?

Currently the e-mail we set up is financed by a Gambia-L member for one year.
Our logfiles show that Gambia College is not using their e-mail to the extent
that we hoped for.
Also as Mr. Sidibeh explains the secretary to Mr.Manneh's computer is not
very well suited for e-mail purposes.
We are considering going to Brikama to move the e-mail to the library computer,
so that more people can access it (hopefully).
Problems with that setup is:
-who to allow access to the computer,
-The library computer is the same old type as the secretary's computer,

A more ideal solution would be to purchase 2-3 good(not necessarily SOA) Pentium
systems and set them up either as standalones or in a small network.

Estimating some of the costs here and work to be done:

-3 x Pentium around D20000,- = D60000,- (~$6000)
-Optional Network(cables,hub?,etc.) = D5000,-(~$500,-)
-Some 5 hours to set up the systems( we are willing to negotiate price on this),

We see two major considerations to this:

-Training of personnel, and making a computer-group at the College,
-Funding and payments,

We can offer to be the hardware/software solution inside The Gambia if there is someone
who can be responsible for the arrangements of funding, buying equipment, sending, make training
arrangements etc.

Any suggestions can be sent to:
tgr@commit.gm
jgr@commit.gm

Regards,
Torstein
Manager&Secretary
Commit Enterprises Ltd.






------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 15:29:54 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: dekat@itis.com
Cc: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <34579CC2.20D8@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Katim S. Touray wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
> here i am with my thoughts on the "Give a book idea":
>
> 1. i think it's a great idea. not only is it good, but it also has a
> precedent, in the fact that Camerounians launched a successful book drive
> for their university in Bamenda or some place like that.
>
> 2. with regards how we go about it implementing the idea, i suggest we use
> the following format (which i think should be a formula for implementing
> others)
>
> a) form a core-group of people who will implement the idea, to be headed if
> possible by the person who originated the idea. in the case of the "Give a
> Book" idea, Ebrima Sall would spear-head the task, unless of course he has
> some pretty good reasons for not wanting to.
>
> b) the core-group will explore the idea further, and come up with an action
> plan. the plan will be disseminated as widely as possible through, but not
> limited to, Gambia-L.
>
> c) if needed more volunteers will be solicited to help implement the plan
>
> d) a progress report sent out to keep people abreast of developments, and
> boost interest in the implementation of the original idea. hopefully,
> progress reports will be occassions for making course corrections, and
> getting additional feedback.
>
> e) at the conclusion of the project, a final report will be issued.
> projects that lead to on-going programs will have to be turned into
> institutions or organizations. for example, the "Give a Book" idea might
> be turned into a foundation, or a permanent staff postion in The Gambia
> College, or National library. either way, the organization or person
> concerned will then be handed the task of continuing the program initiated,
> after a final report is issued.
>
> f) the core-group can disbanded after the implementation of the idea, or
> transfer of responsibilities to the appropriate agency or organization.
>
> 3. let me say that people should not be scared of some of the above
> proposals. for example, that you might be likely to head the group to
> implement your idea should not deter you from sharing your ideas. it will
> be terrible if you do that because you would be killing an idea that could
> have been implemented by someone else. also, please realize that the
> process of seeing your ideas bear fruit can be a very educating experience.
> we all stand to learn a lot by working together toward common small goals.
>
> also, when i say progress reports and stuff like that, i'm not thinking of
> some highly bureaucratic thing. it would suffice to summarize whatever is
> going on in a page or two. this means that reports will be limited to the
> bare essentials, forcing us to concentrate on substance. furthermore that
> the reports would be short and to the point will imply tremendous savings
> in time reading them, and consequently a greater chance of being read. let
> us embark on our own paperwork reduction program.
>
> 4. applying the above suggestions to the "Give a Book" idea will mean that
> we start taking volunteers who would want to join Ebrima Sall to form the
> core group to implement it, and they can take the ball and run!
>
> that's about all for now. have a great day!
>
> Katim
>
> ----------
> > From: Momodou S Sidibeh <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
> > To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> > Subject: SV: "Give A Book" : just an idea
> > Date: Wednesday, October 29, 1997 5:35 AM
> >
Hello Katim .!!
Basically to add to your excellent contributions I would add the
possibility of doing the whole thing with say for example the Catholic
Relief Services or any recognized( in the Gambia) non profit US based
organization.
Reasons
1.They already have the mechanism and offices all over the US to
collect on our behalf and ship also to only the intended schools without
any governments (US or Gambia) involved .
2. When we donate the books we can write it's fair market value as a tax
deduction if we use a certified non profit institute like CRS or World
Vision or World muslim league(Rabitah)--make sure you get the IRS tax
exemption numbers or a receipt.
3. We will have the satisfaction that no one political party gets credit
for this book distribution and that the receipients of the books are the
ones truely in need of it not just friends or "mbokas".

Finally also we will be creating a very good presidence for the
generation that we will leave behind.
Peace
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 15:54:24 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <3457A280.5D55@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

tgr@commit.gm wrote:
>
> Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
> To Gambia-L from Commit Enterprises Ltd.
>
> Momodou S Sidibeh wrote:
> >...a friend and I found out, independently of each other, that it is not just a matter of
> >packaging computers to the college. There are only two or three computers
> >(Torstein knows) and the one used by Mr. Manneh is a 386 with 4Mb RAM. i.e
> >a machine that, in today's software market, is barely better than an
> >advanced typewriter.
> >Aside from the question of hardware, there is also the additional problem
> >of getting the students themselves involved in formualting their needs for
> >computers, which information would dictate the allocation of necessary
> >software. Somebody with a knowledge of systems set-up would have to get
> >involved in assessing needs and formulating requirements, and, with the
> >availaibility of equipment, setting up an operational LAN. In short there
> >is simply the need of organization.
> >Momodou Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm
>
> Gambia College does have a problem with their current system and communication.
>
> With the knowledge I have of the situation at the college,
> I would split it up in 4 parts:
>
> 1) Outdated hardware/software,
> 2) Lack of computers for students & teachers,
> 3) No computergroup(organization),
> 4)No finances available for this kind of investment,?
>
> Currently the e-mail we set up is financed by a Gambia-L member for one year.
> Our logfiles show that Gambia College is not using their e-mail to the extent
> that we hoped for.
> Also as Mr. Sidibeh explains the secretary to Mr.Manneh's computer is not
> very well suited for e-mail purposes.
> We are considering going to Brikama to move the e-mail to the library computer,
> so that more people can access it (hopefully).
> Problems with that setup is:
> -who to allow access to the computer,
> -The library computer is the same old type as the secretary's computer,
>
> A more ideal solution would be to purchase 2-3 good(not necessarily SOA) Pentium
> systems and set them up either as standalones or in a small network.
>
> Estimating some of the costs here and work to be done:
>
> -3 x Pentium around D20000,- = D60000,- (~$6000)
> -Optional Network(cables,hub?,etc.) = D5000,-(~$500,-)
> -Some 5 hours to set up the systems( we are willing to negotiate price on this),
>
> We see two major considerations to this:
>
> -Training of personnel, and making a computer-group at the College,
> -Funding and payments,
>
> We can offer to be the hardware/software solution inside The Gambia if there is someone
> who can be responsible for the arrangements of funding, buying equipment, sending, make training
> arrangements etc.
>
> Any suggestions can be sent to:
> tgr@commit.gm
> jgr@commit.gm
>
> Regards,
> Torstein
> Manager&Secretary
> Commit Enterprises Ltd.

Torstien
did you try to approach any of the rich Gambians or businessmen??

Maybe consider using ysed pentiums or 486 as subsitutes??

Probably have a public one for commercial purposes only where any user
will pay you a minimal fee to use the computer time set to cut off after
fifteen minuites (example)

Users will be picked out of a hat with all the interested parties's
names in by an independent person. If they want to allow others to use
thier time or swap they should be allowed.

just a few ideas on the top of my head

Habib

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 16:26:55 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: "Give A Book" : just an idea
Message-ID: <3457AA1F.6010@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

H. Jared wrote:
>
> tgr@commit.gm wrote:
> >
> > Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
> > via Commit
> >
> > To Gambia-L from Commit Enterprises Ltd.
> >
> > Momodou S Sidibeh wrote:
> > >...a friend and I found out, independently of each other, that it is not just a matter of
> > >packaging computers to the college. There are only two or three computers
> > >(Torstein knows) and the one used by Mr. Manneh is a 386 with 4Mb RAM. i.e
> > >a machine that, in today's software market, is barely better than an
> > >advanced typewriter.
> > >Aside from the question of hardware, there is also the additional problem
> > >of getting the students themselves involved in formualting their needs for
> > >computers, which information would dictate the allocation of necessary
> > >software. Somebody with a knowledge of systems set-up would have to get
> > >involved in assessing needs and formulating requirements, and, with the
> > >availaibility of equipment, setting up an operational LAN. In short there
> > >is simply the need of organization.
> > >Momodou Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm
> >
> > Gambia College does have a problem with their current system and communication.
> >
> > With the knowledge I have of the situation at the college,
> > I would split it up in 4 parts:
> >
> > 1) Outdated hardware/software,
> > 2) Lack of computers for students & teachers,
> > 3) No computergroup(organization),
> > 4)No finances available for this kind of investment,?
> >
> > Currently the e-mail we set up is financed by a Gambia-L member for one year.
> > Our logfiles show that Gambia College is not using their e-mail to the extent
> > that we hoped for.
> > Also as Mr. Sidibeh explains the secretary to Mr.Manneh's computer is not
> > very well suited for e-mail purposes.
> > We are considering going to Brikama to move the e-mail to the library computer,
> > so that more people can access it (hopefully).
> > Problems with that setup is:
> > -who to allow access to the computer,
> > -The library computer is the same old type as the secretary's computer,
> >
> > A more ideal solution would be to purchase 2-3 good(not necessarily SOA) Pentium
> > systems and set them up either as standalones or in a small network.
> >
> > Estimating some of the costs here and work to be done:
> >
> > -3 x Pentium around D20000,- = D60000,- (~$6000)
> > -Optional Network(cables,hub?,etc.) = D5000,-(~$500,-)
> > -Some 5 hours to set up the systems( we are willing to negotiate price on this),
> >
> > We see two major considerations to this:
> >
> > -Training of personnel, and making a computer-group at the College,
> > -Funding and payments,
> >
> > We can offer to be the hardware/software solution inside The Gambia if there is someone
> > who can be responsible for the arrangements of funding, buying equipment, sending, make training
> > arrangements etc.
> >
> > Any suggestions can be sent to:
> > tgr@commit.gm
> > jgr@commit.gm
> >
> > Regards,
> > Torstein
> > Manager&Secretary
> > Commit Enterprises Ltd.
>
> Torstien
> did you try to approach any of the rich Gambians or businessmen??
>
> Maybe consider using ysed pentiums or 486 as subsitutes??
>
> Probably have a public one for commercial purposes only where any user
> will pay you a minimal fee to use the computer time set to cut off after
> fifteen minuites (example)
>
> Users will be picked out of a hat with all the interested parties's
> names in by an independent person. If they want to allow others to use
> thier time or swap they should be allowed.
>
> just a few ideas on the top of my head
>
> Habib
xx

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 19:17:03 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Yusupha Jatta "Payus"
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971029191703.0068f28c@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Payus,
Apology accepted. I am also busy with my school work at the University of
Toronto, where I'm a graduate student in African History. I am here with
my wife Isatou Tamba (from Bakau) but we have no child yet.
Congratulation for bringing your son and having another one down there. I
am also happy to know that you are trying hard in terms of education.
Ilearnt that your sister Mbassy is in Denmark, if so, please extend my
regards to her. How is your family in Serrekunda?---Kebba (Faaba), Borry,
Abu, Yama, Mano, Patrick, Solo and the rest.
Hey! you are invited to visit us at any time.

Paul

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 19:23:46 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Ouijimai
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971029192346.0068c13c@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Ati,
Thanks for your note. We are definitely waiting for the portraits. Ours
are also on the way. Regards to you, Anne-Bett and little Ouijimai from
Isatou and myself.


Gibbakulung!!!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 11:21:56 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
Message-ID: <9710301621.AA35390@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Andrea, you wrote:
>
> I thought this could be of interest for some of you:
>
> Meeting of the Chambers of Commerce of Dakar, Ziguinchor, Kolda, Kaolack
> and The Gambia

Andrea, Thanks for the forwarding of that article. I just now read it. I
am especially interested in any information about commerce and business in
the Gambia and west africa. If you have any more information, please
don't hesitate to forward it either through the list or through my private
addresses.

"A Jaaraama" ("Thank you" in Fulla)

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 11:56:47 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Meeting of Senegalese/Gambian Chambers of Commerce
Message-ID: <3458BC4F.24EA@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Andrea, you wrote:
> >
> > I thought this could be of interest for some of you:
> >
> > Meeting of the Chambers of Commerce of Dakar, Ziguinchor, Kolda, Kaolack
> > and The Gambia
>
> Andrea, Thanks for the forwarding of that article. I just now read it. I
> am especially interested in any information about commerce and business in
> the Gambia and west africa. If you have any more information, please
> don't hesitate to forward it either through the list or through my private
> addresses.
>
> "A Jaaraama" ("Thank you" in Fulla)
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
> =======================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
Moe and Andrea
I am also interested.
Please forward any similar information to me at
hghanim@erols.com
Thanks
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 13:29:57 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Privatisation pays off BIG TIME
Message-ID: <9710301829.AA67280@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Somehow inspiring....

PANA reported that DAAR, a Nigerian Communications company and private
owners of private radio and television station will launch a 24-hour
global satellite broadcast to Africa and around the world.

The executive chairman of DAAR Communications, Raymond Dokpesi, said,
"We shall present to the world a programme slant that seeks to integrate
the world's positive values ... we shall offer Africa's past and
present from an original perspective".

DAAR Communications also owns the Africa Independent Television (AIT).

Dokpesi also added " the global satellite station would on daily basis
present a refreshing but factual insight into the African experience,
worldwide... and would help project African positive image". [After all],
"It is only Africans themselves that can project the image of their
continent".

It is reported the entire scheme was being financed with funds raised by a
consortium of five Nigerian banks (Can you dig?).

All Africans (and non-Africans) are urged to contribute to the project
through subscription.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gambia-L,

Eventhough the article is not in its entirity, my point is that this
really shows how indigenous Nigerians (and their Banks) are towards
investing in Africa and beyond. The privatisation business is indeed the
way to GO! I think it is high time we stop thinking that Western investors
will bail us out.

Nigeria is really setting the satandard for Communications in west Africa.
If you can, take a look at a new CNN (Reuters) article today entitled:
"Nigeria Committed to Open Telecoms, Says New Entrant"

The first paragraph reads, "Nigeria's military government has passed the
point of no return in opening up the lucrative telecommunications sector
to private investors", the state-run phone company's first competitor said
on Thursday.

(Just an excited Moe) :-).

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 14:21:04 -0500
From: "H. Jared" <globexinc@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Privatisation pays off BIG TIME
Message-ID: <3458DE20.15C1@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Somehow inspiring....
>
> PANA reported that DAAR, a Nigerian Communications company and private
> owners of private radio and television station will launch a 24-hour
> global satellite broadcast to Africa and around the world.
>
> The executive chairman of DAAR Communications, Raymond Dokpesi, said,
> "We shall present to the world a programme slant that seeks to integrate
> the world's positive values ... we shall offer Africa's past and
> present from an original perspective".
>
> DAAR Communications also owns the Africa Independent Television (AIT).
>
> Dokpesi also added " the global satellite station would on daily basis
> present a refreshing but factual insight into the African experience,
> worldwide... and would help project African positive image". [After all],
> "It is only Africans themselves that can project the image of their
> continent".
>
> It is reported the entire scheme was being financed with funds raised by a
> consortium of five Nigerian banks (Can you dig?).
>
> All Africans (and non-Africans) are urged to contribute to the project
> through subscription.
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Gambia-L,
>
> Eventhough the article is not in its entirity, my point is that this
> really shows how indigenous Nigerians (and their Banks) are towards
> investing in Africa and beyond. The privatisation business is indeed the
> way to GO! I think it is high time we stop thinking that Western investors
> will bail us out.
>
> Nigeria is really setting the satandard for Communications in west Africa.
> If you can, take a look at a new CNN (Reuters) article today entitled:
> "Nigeria Committed to Open Telecoms, Says New Entrant"
>
> The first paragraph reads, "Nigeria's military government has passed the
> point of no return in opening up the lucrative telecommunications sector
> to private investors", the state-run phone company's first competitor said
> on Thursday.
>
> (Just an excited Moe) :-).
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> ========================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
I agree with Moe

Dr Raymond is also a good friend of a former coleague of mine.

Best wishes and success to his project

Habib

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:02:35 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: WORLD BANK scholarships (fwd)
Message-ID: <9710302002.AA30242@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

For the sake of the new members, I am forwarding (for a second time) the
world bank scholarship application info.

> The World Bank, with funding from the Government of Japan,
> established the World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program (WBGSP)
> for graduate studies in subjects related to economic
> development. This program, now known as the Regular Joint
> Japan/ World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program (JJ/WBGSP), is
> entering its tenth year. The program awards scholarships to
> individuals from World Bank member countries to undertake
> graduate studies at universities renowned for their development
> research and teaching. In its regular program, the JJ/WBGSP has
> awarded scholarships to nearly 900 scholars chosen from a total
> of over 19,000 applicants.
>
>
> * Basic Eligibility Criteria
>
> To apply for any JJ/WBGSP scholarship, applicants must
> meet the following specific criteria:
>
> . Be a national of a World Bank member country;
> . Be under forty-five years of age, and normally under age
> thirty-five;
> . Be in good health;
> . Be of good character;
> . Hold at least a bachelor's degree or its equivalent in a
> development-related field;
> . Have a least two (preferably four to five) years of
> recent professional experience in a field related to
> economic development, usually in their home country, and
> usually in public service, although strong candidates
> from the private sector will also be considered.
>
> Individuals applying for the regular JJ/WBGSP scholarship
> must also meet the following criteria:
>
> . Possess documentation showing that they have applied for
> a graduate degree program or its equivalent at two
> universities located in any World Bank member country;
> and
> . Propose a program of study related to development, which
> will usually be in a field such as economics, business,
> planning, or a related area; however, in recent years the
> program has made awards to individuals proposing to study
> in such fields as health, population, agriculture,
> engineering, marine resources, education, and other
> development-related subjects, provided the focus of the
> study program is on the public policy aspects of these
> fields.
>
> * Other Selection Criteria
>
> While applicants from all World Bank member countries may
> apply for a JJ/WBGSP scholarship, the programs give priority
> to:
>
> . World Bank countries currently eligible to borrow,
> especially low- and middle-income countries;
> . Women;
> . Applicants with few other resources and from lower social
> and economic classes;
> . Applicants who have not had previous opportunities or
> graduate study outside their home country; and
> . Applicants who do not already hold a graduate degree from
> an industrialized country.
>
> Staff of the World Bank Group, Executive Directors, Executive
> Directors' staff, consultants, and relatives of the
> aforementioned are excluded from consideration.
>
>
> * How to apply
>
> Application forms for the Regular Program in English,
> French, and Spanish are available from the JJ/WBGSP Secretariat
> at EDI from September 1997 through January 1998. Forms are also
> available at World Bank offices in many countries, and the
> Secretariat supplies forms to leading universities worldwide
> and to other donor agencies.
>
> * Address for inquiries and completed applications:
>
> The JJ/WBGSP Secretariat
> Room M-4017
> 1818 H Street, NW
> Washington, D.C. 20433
> USA
>
>
> For more details, browse:
> http://www.worldbank.org/html/edi/jjwbgsp.html
>
> _________________________
> Daphne
> October 7, 1997
>




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:13:03 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: DV-99 VISA LOTTERY (fwd)
Message-ID: <9710302013.AA33684@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

This is sent again ONLY for those who are interested.

NOTE that the application began on October 24, 1997!

So get on with it.....

Good Luck!

Moe S. Jallow
---------------------------------------------------------------------


DV-99 VISA LOTTERY

DETAILS AND APPLICATION PROCEDURE
IMMIGRATION BULLETIN, Special DV-99 Lottery Edition

NOTE: On August 26, 1997, the Department of State released
information on the next green card lottery. In this special issue,
the most common questions about the lottery are addressed.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT DV-99

What is the "Green Card" Lottery?

The U.S. Congress has authorized the allotment of 55,000
immigrant visas in the DV-99 category during Fiscal Year 1999
(which runs from October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999).
Foreign nationals who are natives of countries determined by
the I.N.S. (according to a mathematical formula based upon
population totals and totals of specified immigrant admissions
for a 5-year period) are eligible to apply. The application period
will begin at noon Eastern US time on October 24, 1997 and will
end at noon Eastern US time on November 24, 1997.


Nationals of which countries are excluded?

Canada, China-mainland China and Taiwan (nationals of Hong
Kong are not included), Columbia, The Dominican Republic,
El Salvador, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Philippines, Poland,
South Korea, United Kingdom (natives of Northern Ireland and
Hong Kong are eligible, but natives of Anguilla, Bermuda, British
Virgin Islands, Caymen Islands, Falkland Islands, Gibralter,
Montserrat, Pitcairn, St. Helena, and the Turks and Caicos Islands
are not eligible), Vietnam


How are visas allotted?

The DV-99 program apportions visa issuance among six
geographic regions (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America (other
than Mexico), Oceania, and South America (including Mexico,
Central America and the Caribbean). The world is divided up
into high and low admission regions and each of the six regions
is divided into high and low admission states. A greater portion
of the visas go to the low admission regions than to high
admissions regions. High admission states are entirely
excluded from the lottery (those states are listed above) and low
admission states compete equally with other low admission
states in the same region. No single state may receive more than
7% (3,850) of the 55,000 allotted visas. The allotment for this year
is as follows:

Africa: 21,409
Asia: 7,254
Europe: 23,024
North America: 8 (only the Bahamas is included)
South America: 2,468
Oceania: 837


Who is eligible to apply for the lottery?

To receive a DV-99 visa, an individual must be a native of a low
admission foreign state (described above). The individual must
have at least a high school education or its equivalent, or, within
the preceding five years, two years work experience in an
occupation requiring at least two years training or experience.


What does it mean to have a "high school education or its equivalent?"

"High School education or its equivalent" means the successful
completion of a twelve year course of elementary and secondary
education in the U.S. or successful completion in another county
of a formal course of elementary and secondary education
comparable to complete a 12 year education in the U.S. or
successful completion in another country of a formal cause of
elementary and secondary education comparable to completion
of a 12 year education in the U.S. Passage of a high school
equivalency examination is not sufficient. It is permissible to have
completed one's education in less than 12 years or greater than
12 years if the course of study completed is equivalent to a U.S.
high school education. Documentary proof of education (including
a diploma or school transcript) should NOT be submitted with the
application, but must be presented to the consular office at the
time of formally applying for an immigrant visa application.


What does it mean to have "two years work experience in an
occupation requiring at least two years training or experience?"

The determination of which occupations require at least two years
of training or experience shall be based upon the Department of
Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. If the occupation is not
listed in the DOT, the Department of State will consider alternate
evidence. Please Email or write me if you need to check the DOT
(this will probably not be necessary for the vast majority of you
since most of you have high school degrees or the equivalent.
As with proof of education, documentary proof of work experience
should not be submitted with the application, but must be
presented to the consular office at the time of a formal immigrant
visa application.


Can I be a "native" of a country other than the country in which I
was born?

A native is both someone born within one of qualifying countries
and someone entitled to the "charged" to such country under
Section 202(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Thus
someone may be (1) charged to the country of birth of his/her
spouse; (2) a minor dependent child can be charged to the
country of birth of a parent; and (3) an applicant born in a country
of which neither parent was a native may be charged to the
country of birth of either parent. If one claims to be a native of a
country other than where one was born, he/she must include
a statement to that effect on the lottery application and must
show the country of chargeability on the application envelope
(see discussion of the application form and envelope).


Will applying for the lottery affect one's ability to receive a
nonimmigrant visa?

Probably not. Technically, filing a visa lottery application is
equivalent to filing an immigrant petition. According to source
at the Department of State, a consulate will only be notified IF
the person is selected in the lottery. An individual who is not
chosen is on his honor to state that he/she applied for the lottery.
Theoretically, if your name is selected in the lottery, you may have
trouble renewing nonimmigrant status while waiting for your name
to be cleared for processing (see discussion on the postselection
process for securing a green card). This should only be a
temporary problem since permanent residency should eventually
be awarded. There is still a risk that you will fail to be deemed
eligible for the DV-99 visa or the Department of State will have
overestimated the number of individuals to select in the lottery
(see discussion on how the selection process works). However,
of all the lawyers with whom I have spoken, none have ever
reported a problem with a client having entered the lottery. We
have instructed our clients to answer the question on the OF
156 concerning previous immigrant visa applications as follows:
"My lawyer entered me in the DV-99 lottery." We have never had
a problem reported. We have yet to hear of anyone denied a visa
because of a previous lottery application.


Do I need to be in lawful visa status to compete?

An individual who is in the U.S. need NOT be in lawful status to
compete in the lottery. However, the Department of State has
indicated that it will share information with the Immigration and
Naturalization Service for the "formulation, amendment,
administration and enforcement" of the country's immigration
laws. Furthermore, a person out of status may be subject to
the new three and ten year bars on admission of the 1996
immigration law and unable to take advantage of winning the
lottery. Because the laws on this subject are highly complex,
it is recommended that out of status persons contact an
immigration lawyer to determine their status and an
appropriate strategy.


Does it matter whether I am or am not in the U.S.?

Individuals who otherwise meet the requirements for competition
in the lottery, may compete whether they are in the United States
or in a foreign country.


Are there any limitations on the number of entries I can send in
for the lottery?

Each individual is limited to one application in the lottery. If more
than one application is received, the individual will be totally
disqualified. Note: Hundreds of thousands of applications are
rejected every year due to multiple applications.


May a husband and wife each submit a separate application?

Yes. If otherwise qualified, a husband and a wife may each submit
one lottery application. If either is selected in the lottery, the
other would be entitled to derivative status.


If I win, can I get green cards for my family?

Your spouse and unmarried children under the age of 21 are
automatically entitled to the same status as you.


Is there a minimum age to apply for the lottery?

There is not a minimum age to apply for the lottery. However,
the education/work experience requirements will effectively
preclude most people under 18 from applying.


May I adjust status in the U.S. if I am selected?

An applicant may adjust status (switch to permanent residency
in the U.S.) if they meet the normal requirements for adjusting
status with the INS (including not having previously been out of
visa status). Applicants who adjust must first send the forms
they receive from the National Visa Center back to the National
Visa Center. In order to apply for adjustment of status, the INS
must be able to complete action on the case before September
30, 1999.


How does the selection process work?

The National Visa Center in New Hampshire will receive all
applications. Upon receipt, the NVC will place the letter into one
of six geographic regions and assign the letter an individual
number. Within each region, the first letter randomly selected
will be the first person registered, the second letter selected
will be the second person registered, etc. When a case is
registered, the applicant will immediately be sent a notification
letter which will give visa application instructions.

About 100,000 persons, both principal applicants and their
spouses and children, will be registered. Since it is probable
that some of the first 55,000 persons registered will not apply
for a DV-99 visa, this figure is assumed to eventually be
reduced to about 55,000. However, there is a risk that some
applicants will be left out. According to the Department of
State, all applicants will be informed promptly of their place on
the list. Each month visas will be issued, according to
registration lottery rank order, to those ready for visa issuance
for that month. Once 55,000 visas are issued, the program ends.
Registrants for this year's lottery will have to have their visa in
hand by September 30, 1999 at the latest. You must be
prepared to act promptly if your name is selected.


How will I know if I was not selected?

The State Department will not notify applicants who are not
selected. The only way you will know that you are not selected is
if you have not received a registration notification letter before the
date the INS officially states that it has stopped notifying people
(expected to between April and July of 1998).


Is there an application fee to enter the lottery?

No. There is no government application fee for submitting a
lottery application. If you win the lottery, you will pay a special
DV-99 case processing fee later. Winners will also have to pay
regular visa fees at the time of visa issuance. Certain law firms
and immigration consultants offer application services and the
fees for such services may vary. IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO
USE SUCH A SERVICE.


Can someone selected in the lottery receive a waiver of any of the
grounds of visa ineligibility on the basis of winning the lottery?

No. There is no special provision for the waiver of any grounds
of visa ineligibility for lottery winners other than those provided
for in the Immigration and Nationality Act. Also, holders of J 1
visas with a two year home residency requirement will not be
able to receive a waiver of this requirement by virtue of being
selected in the lottery. A holder of a J visa can still enter the
lottery, but he/she will have to qualify for a residency waiver in
the same manner as is normally required to get such a waiver.
Because all visas must be issued by the end of September
1999, individuals who have not yet begun their home residency
are effectively precluded (unless they are able to get a waiver of
the home residency requirement quickly).


May someone apply for a DV-99 visa if they are already registered
in another visa category?

Yes.


In what region is my native country assigned?

(1) Africa

Algeria
Angola
Benin
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Central African Republic
Chad
Comoros
Congo
Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast)
Djibouti
Egypt
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Gabon
Gambia, The
Ghana
Guinea (Conakry)
Guinea-Bissau
Kenya
Lesotho
Liberia
Libya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mauritania
Mauritius
Morocco
Mozambique
Namibia
Niger
Nigeria
Rwanda
Sao Tome and Principe
Senegal
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Somalia
South Africa
Sudan
Swaziland
Tanzania
Togo
Tunisia
Uganda
Zaire
Zambia
Zimbabwe

(2) Asia

Afghanistan
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Bhutan
Brunei
Burma
Cambodia
China-mainland (not eligible for DV-99)
China-Taiwan (not eligible for DV-99)
Hong Kong
India (not eligible for DV-99)
Indonesia
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Korea, North
Korea, South (not eligible for DV-99)
Kuwait
Laos
Lebanon
Malaysia
Maldives
Mongolia
Nepal
Oman
Pakistan
Philippines (not eligible for DV-99)
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
Sri Lanka
Syria
Thailand
United Arab Emirates
Vietnam (not eligible for DV-99)
Yemen

(3) Europe

Albania
Andorra
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belgium
Bosnia and Herzegovina (including components)
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France (including components and dependent areas overseas)
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Malta
Moldova
Monaco
Montenegro
Netherlands (including components and dependent areas overseas)
Northern Ireland
Norway
Poland (not eligible for DV-99)
Portugal (including components and dependent areas overseas)
Romania
Russia
San Marino
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom (not eligible for DV-99; NOTE: natives of
Northern Ireland and Hong Kong are eligible, but natives of Anguilla,
Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Caymen Islands, Falkland Islands,
Gibralter, Montserrat, Pitcairn, St. Helena, and the Turks and Caicos
Islands are not eligible)
Uzbekistan
Vatican City (an independent city under the jurisdiction of the
Holy See)

(4) North America

Bahamas, The
Canada (not eligible for DV-99)
United States

(5) Oceania

Australia
Fiji
Kiribati
Marshall Islands
Micronesia, Federated States of
Nauru
New Zealand
Palau
Papua New Guinea
Solomon Islands
Tonga
Tuvalu
Vanuatu
Western Samoa

(6) South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean

Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Barbados
Belize
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia (not eligible for DV-99)
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominica
Dominican Republic (not eligible for DV-99)
Ecuador
El Salvador (not eligible for DV-99)
Grenada
Grenadines
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Jamaica (not eligible for DV-99)
Mexico (not eligible for DV-99)
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
St. Kitts and Nevis
St. Lucia
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Suriname
Trinidad and Tobago
Uruguay
Venezuela

------------------------------------------------------------------

HOW TO APPLY FOR THE LOTTERY

There is no form for the DV-99 lottery. All that is required is
that the proper information is typed or clearly printed in the
Roman alphabet on a plain sheet of paper, the application
is signed by the applicant, a proper photograph is included
and the application is sent in a properly addressed envelope
via regular mail.

Each application must contain the following information and
documents:

1. APPLICANT'S FULL NAME

Last Name, First Name and Middle Name
(Italicize Last Name/Surname/Family Name)
Example: Doe, John James [remember to italicize
last name]

2. APPLICANT'S DATE AND PLACE OF BIRTH

Date of Birth: Day, Month, Year
Example: 15 November 1961

Place of Birth: City/Town, District/County, Province,
Country (use current name of country if country's name
has changed)
Example: Munich, Bavaria, Germany,

3. NAME, DATE AND PLACE OF BIRTH OF APPLICANT'S SPOUSE
AND CHILDREN

[Note: Do not list parents as they are not entitled
to derivative status.]

4. APPLICANT'S NATIVE COUNTRY IF DIFFERENT FROM
COUNTRY OF BIRTH

5. APPLICANT'S MAILING ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER
(if possible) AND NEAREST CONSULATE

Be sure the address is complete since this is where notification
will be sent if the application is selected. A telephone number is
optional. Also list location of U.S. Consular office closest to
current residence or last residence prior to entering U.S.

6. The Applicant's signature is required on the application
(preferably the bottom). This is a new requirement.

7. A recent 1 1/2 inch by 1 1/2 inch (or 37 mm by 37 mm)
photograph of the applicant. The applicant's name must be printed
across the back of the photograph. Be sure to tape the photo to the
application form using a clear tape. Do not staple or paper clip the
photo.

The application should be placed in an envelope which is between
6 inches and 10 inches (15 cm to 25 cm) in length and between 3 1/2
inches and 4 1/2 inches (9 cm to 11 cm) in width.

In the upper left hand corner of the front of the envelope must be
the country of which the applicant is a native. Typed or clearly
printed below the country must be the same name and mailing
address of the applicant as are shown on the application form.

Example:

New Zealand
James John Doe
1111 Main Street
Nashville, Tennessee 37204


WHERE TO SEND THE APPLICATION

Applications must be sent by regular mail (not by hand delivery,
telegram, or any means requiring acknowledgment such as
registered mail or express mail) to one of the six following
addresses, depending upon the region of the applicant's native
country.

Note carefully the importance of using the correct postal zip code
for each region:

AFRICA: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00213
U.S.A.


ASIA: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00210
U.S.A.


SOUTH AMERICA: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00211
U.S.A.


EUROPE: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00212
U.S.A.


OCEANIA: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00214
U.S.A.


NORTH AMERICA: DV-99 Program
National Visa Center
Portsmouth, NH 00215
U.S.A.

---------------------------------------------------------------




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:37:57 -0500 (EST)
From: ndeye marie <njie.1@osu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Scholarship for Sub-Saharan African (fwd)
Message-ID: <199710302037.PAA24666@mail3.uts.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>
>The Rockefeller Foundation is once again offering a
>program for African scholars, the "Africa Dissertation
>Internship Awards" (ADIA).
>
>ADIA provides funding for dissertation field research in
>sub-Saharan Africa. Citizens of sub-Saharan African
>nations enrolled in doctoral programs in the United
>States and Canada are eligible. Priority is given to
>research on economic development in the areas of
>agriculture, environment, education, health, life
>sciences, population and the humanities. The hope of
>the foundation is that the program will help create a
>generation of Africans better prepared to contribute
>effectively to development objectives in their home
>countries.
>
>If you have further questions, or need application
>materials, please contact:
>
> Ann R. Trotter
> ADIA Program Coordinator
> The Rockefeller Foundation
> 440 Fifth Avenue
> New York, NY 10018-2702
> (212) 869-8500
> fax (212) 764-3468
>
>
>_____________________________________________________________________
>Sent by RocketMail. Get your free e-mail at http://www.rocketmail.com
>
>
>
>----- End Included Message -----
>
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 15:55:03 -0500 (EST)
From: Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.971030155302.15956A-100000@acc5>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Greetings:
Eretimy George has been added to the list. Welcome
to our bantaba and please send a brief introduction about
yourself to the group. Our address is: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

LatJor


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 16:22:55 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: A DEAL for the ATLANTANS
Message-ID: <9710302122.AA56712@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Gambia-Lers in the Atlanta Area,

I have partnered with a colleague in developing a hands on training course
targeted specifically at members of my community living in the Atlanta
area.

With this course, you can now get three HOT IT certifications (using the
effort required to gain one), for practically a half of the normal price:

Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
Microsoft Certified Internet Product Specialist
Microsoft Certified Windows NT Product Specialist

With just one of these certifications, some employers are willing to pay a
starting salary of $60,000.00 per year to a candidate with no previous
experience!!!

If you are interested in developing a career in the hyper growth IT
industry of Networking and Internet application development, you will be
pleased to learn that I will be offering a 6 month part time course
beginning in January 1998.

For any Atlantans who require more details, you can send me private email
at: mjallow@hayes.com

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 16:08:19 -0600 (CST)
From: Paul Jammeh <st2063@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: "GAMBIA-L (Gambia and related issues)" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Fwd: why Black men love Black women (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971030160745.4357A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII



---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 16:18:20 -0600 (CST)
From: Sharon Hanna <st2739@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: Paul Jammeh <st2063@student-mail.jsu.edu>
Subject: Fwd: why Black men love Black women (fwd)



---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 18:25:57 -0400 (EDT)
From: Aubreyhurs@aol.com
To: st2739@student-mail.jsu.edu, Wridowling@aol.com,
Sharnette.Ferguson@cigna.com, pfrederick@fpcg.com,
HFBarringtonIII@classic.msn.com, HTH319@juno.com,
gtr4V@server1.mail.virginia.edu, kvarner@aamc.org,
james_hunter@mcgraw-hill.com, don.mullins@lipper.com,
dorothy_watkins@constitution.com, james.perkins@fritolay.com,
SHARNETTE@postoffice.worldnet.att.net
Subject: Fwd: why Black men love Black women

a nice selection for you.
I think a woman wrote it. :-)
---------------------
Forwarded message:
From: K.LEW@fordfound.org (Lew, Kim)
To: Aubreyhurs@aol.com (Aubreyhurs@aol.com), batesl@moodys.com
(batesl@moodys.com), LorisaB@aol.com (LorisaB@aol.com),
MichelleD@pareto-partners.co.uk (Michelle DeFossett), ychaplin@isdial.co.za
(Yvonne L. Chaplin)
Date: 97-10-23 15:21:01 EDT


ANY COMMENTS?




Date: 10.20.97 9:09 AM
>
>Read on.
>______________________________________________________________________
_________
>Subject: (Fwd) FW: why Black men love Black women (fwd)
>From: <dramsay@sed.stel.com > at smtpout
>Date: 10/20/97 9:09 AM
>
>Don't believe the hype...this is the deal...
>
>"WHY BLACK MEN LOVE BLACK WOMEN"
>
>Let there be no doubt, Black men love Black women. Ask men what
>they love about Black women and some will say they love the many
hues
>of a Black woman's skin--the reddish-brown cinnamons, the golden
>honeys, the milk chocolates and jet black coffees, no cream. Ask
others and
>they will say they love the Black woman"s inner temperament-FRAGILE
AND
>PRETTY LIKE A TEACUP one minute and
>HARD AND COMPLEX LIKE A CHINESE PUZZLE the next.
>
>Still others will say they love Black women because Black women
>are the EPITOME OF BEAUTY, the giver of life, a steadfast protector
>and a nurturer. They will say they Love Black women because Black
>women continue to walk proudly, absording life's blows with grace
and
>fortitude, serving as the glue that holds together an entire race of
people.
>
>Many men will say they love Black women, because, more than ANY OTHER
WOMAN
>IN THE WORLD they are the easiest to love. And although BLACK MEN,
like all
>Men, sometimes have a hard time SHOWING IT. THEY WILL BE THE FIRST
TO
>ADMIT THEY CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT BLACK WOMEN. HER BEING IS TO BE LOVED
AND
>CHERISHED BY HER MAN, SHE'S A QUEEN. "A TRUE QUEEN".
>WE LOVE BLACK WOMEN BECAUSE THEY ARE THE MOTHERS OF OUR BLACK
FUTURE.
>
>WE LOVE BLACK WOMEN BECAUSE OF THEIR ENDURING STRENGTH, A STRENGTH
THAT AT
>TIMES HAS RISEN ABOVE THE FAILURES OF BLACK FATHERS.
>
>WE LOVE THEIR CURLY HAIR, THEIR BRAIDED HAIR, THEIR STRAIGHTENED AND
EVEN
>KINKY HAIR.
>
>WE LOVE THEIR FULL LIPS, AND OF COURSE, THEIR BROWN SUGAR SKIN.
>
>BUT MOST OF ALL, WE LOVE BLACK WOMEN BECAUSE WE ARE A PRODUCT OF A
BLACK
>WOMAN. BLACK MEN ARE BORN OF BLACK WOMEN AND INFLUENCED BY THE BLACK
WOMEN
>IN OUR LIVES.
>
>WE HAVE TO BE ABLE TO LOVE BLACK WOMEN IN ORDER FOR US TO LOVE
OURSELVES.
>
>
>=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
>Affirmations are important in our lives...
>NOW... MTDS has Affirmations for Netters
>Go To http://www.mtdsnet.com/affirms.html and BREATHE
>=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
>*************************************************
>Doug Ramsay <dramsay@sed.stel.com>
>
>
>Stanford Telecom
>Network Systems Group/CNS
>phone: (703) 438-8053
>fax: (703) 438-7922
>*************************************************
>
>
>
>

"The man or woman
who treasures his friends
is usually solid gold himself."
MARHORIE HOLMES
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Ray Derek Carthy *
* Assistant Director *
* Boston University *
* Office of Housing *
* 985 Commonwealth Ave. *
* Boston, MA 02215 *
* (617) 353-3511 *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *










------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Oct 1997 16:31:36 -0800 (PST)
From: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.96a.971030162321.9258A-100000@dante22.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I would like the list managers to enlist mr. Joseph
Jassey. His email address is: jjassey@MCI.com.
thanx.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 03:49:44 -0500 (EST)
From: Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
To: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
Cc: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: new member
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.971031034755.18481C-100000@acc5>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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Joseph Jassey has been added to the list. Welcome to our
bantaba and please send a brief introduction about yourself
to our group. Our address is: gambia-l@u,washington.edu

LatJor


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 06:18:14 PST
From: "Omar Gassama" <kassama@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <19971031141814.24812.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Dear list-managers
could anyone register this brohter Seedy Kany<seedyk@hotmail.com>

thanks
gassamaba


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 16:36:48 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New members
Message-ID: <19971031153714.AAB41510@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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Greetings,
Both Seedy Kany and Bakebba Camara have been added to the list.
Welcome to our Bantaba and please send a brief introduction about
yourselves to our group. Our address is: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

Regards
Momodou Camara

*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 11:10:46 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Ethnicity and Identity
Message-ID: <9710311610.AA39562@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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I was just thinking about the historicity of the peoples who currently
inhabit the area call Gambia.

Assuming that the consciousness of "other" ethnic groups were not present
in the Gambia around the 1900s, when were these groups invented? I am
specifically referring to the two different "Narr" groups that are part of
the Gambian society. Due to my little knowledge of Gambian history, I can
only make assumptions. First I will assume that historians and
anthropologists may have have documented the invention of ethnic and of
tribes all over the continent. From that, I will also assume that their
(historians and anthropologists) findings would agree with the fact that
the invention took place at the time when the colonial state was also
invented.

So in a sense, if my assumptions are correct, the "Narr" groups, though
excluded politically, are part and parcel of the history of the nation of
the Gambia. They did not have to invent their own identity because they
were just DIFFERENT, racially, that is. What they did, however, was to
isolate themselves from the rest of the population. Those that are refered
to as "Nar Gannar" are different from the "Nar Beirut" or Lebanese
maronites most of whom (I suppose (do you see my ignorance???)) do not
intermarry with indigeneous Gambians.

How has these groups influenced the shaping of ideas and attitudes about
ourselves and how has their presence in the Gambia helped the counry both
economically and socially?

Habib, please do not take this as an insult. I am just trying to learn
something. After all, I can trace my ancestors back to the FUTA DJALLON
highlands in Guinea.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

==========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 14:52:40 -0500 (EST)
From: "N'Deye Marie N'Jie" <njie.1@osu.edu>
To: papaf@iastate.edu, africans@iastate.edu, gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Nat Res Management Position
Message-ID: <2.2.16.19971031145106.1a0f7784@postbox.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 14:00:07 -0500 (EST)
>Reply-To: GUSTAFSON.4@osu.edu
>Sender: owner-fabegrad@lists.acs.ohio-state.edu
>From: "Robert J. Gustafson" <GUSTAFSON.4@osu.edu>
>To: fabegrad@lists.acs.ohio-state.edu
>Subject: Natural Resources Management Position
>X-Sender: rgustafs@pop.service.ohio-state.edu
>X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
>
>>>Following is a rather wordy faculty position announcement. If you have any
>>>underemployed PhD.s looking for work, you might pass this along to them.
>>>
>>>
>>>University of Denver, Assistant or Associate Professor of Geography
>>>
>>>Tenure track position beginning September 1, 1998. Ph.D. required. Salary
>>>and level of appointment commensurate with experience. Expertise in
>>>Natural Resources Management, especially in public lands management, water
>>>resources management, or energy resources management. The successful
>>>candidate is expected to support established and growing undergraduate
>>>programs in geography and environmental science as well as graduate
>>>programs in geography. Candidates must have a commitment to quality
>>>teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and for developing a
>>>strong research program in natural resources management. Teaching
>>>responsibilities include courses in natural resources management and
>>>related topics (such as public lands management, global resources, and
>>>management of specific natural resources). Undergraduate student advising
>>>and participation in graduate research committees is expected.
>>>
>>>The University of Denver is a mid-sized independent institution situated in
>>>the dynamic Front Range urban corridor. The Department of Geography offers
>>>the BA, MA, and PhD degrees in geography and BA and BS degrees in
>>>environmental science; there are approximately 130 undergraduate majors and
>>>30 graduate students in residence. A variety of teaching and research labs
>>>are available, including the University's High Altitude Laboratory located
>>>on Mt. Evans, about an hour's drive west of Denver. The department's GIS
>>>Laboratory includes 14 PCs and two UNIX workstations as well as a variety
>>>of peripheral digitizing and plotting devices. An established corporate
>>>partnership with ESRI, Inc., provides the GIS lab with current versions of
>>>PC and workstation ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW. Please visit the department web
>>>page at <http://www.du.edu/geography/> for more information.
>>>
>>>The University of Denver is committed to enhance the diversity of its
>>>faculty and staff and encourages application from women, minorities,
>>>persons with disabilities, and veterans. See the University of Denver home
>>>page on the world wide web for additional information <http://www.du.edu/>.
>>>
>>>
>>>Please send a letter of application, statement of teaching and research
>>>interests, curriculum vitae, graduate transcripts, and arrange to have
>>>three letters of recommendation sent directly to the Search Committee.
>>>Complete applications received by December 1, 1997, will be given full
>>>consideration.
>>>
>>>Apply to: Donald G. Sullivan, Chair, Search Committee, Department of
>>>Geography, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208-0183. Phone:
>>>303-871-2513. Fax: 303-871-2201. Email: dsulliva@du.edu
>>>
>>>
>>>This listserv is sponsored by:
>>>Richard Chinn Environmental Training
>>>
>>>Specializing in all areas of environmental training:
>>>*Wetland Delineation (including the ACOE Wetland Delineator Certification
>>>Program training)
>>>*Endangered & Threatened Species Surveying
>>>*OSHA-required hazardous waste operations (40 hour initial, 24 hour
>>>initial, 8 hour supervisor)
>>>*Train-the-Trainer to become a HAZWOPER trainer and/or a Certified
>>>Environmental Trainer.
>>>*Field sampling for surface water, groundwater, soils and sediment.
>>>*Environmental Site Assesments (per ASTM standards)
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>>>813.662.0689
>>>############################################
>>>To unsubscribe, send a message to unsubscribe@envtechcenter.com with
>>>"unsubscribe" in the body of the message.
>>>############################################
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>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>

-----------------------------------
N'Deye Marie N'Jie
Graduate Research Associate
The Ohio State University
Rm 260 Agricultural Engineering Bldg
590 Woody Hayes Drive
Columbus, OH 43210

Fax: (614)292-9448
Phone: (614) 688-3445 (W)
E-mail: njie.1@osu.edu


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:47:37 -0500 (EST)
From: Gabriel Ndow <gndow@spelman.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Darboe visits Atlanta
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.971031153355.21650A-100000@acc5>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Greetings:
I was informed last night that Lawyer Darboe, the opposition
leader of the U.D.P. will be in town today. He will be
holding a town hall meeting this evening at 8:00p.m.

Location: Marriot Courtyard Inn (Near Cumberland Mall)
Directions: From Atlanta, take 75N to Cobb Pkwy. Pass
Cumberland Mall and turn right on Acres Mill Road.

Because of the suddeness of this meeting, I urge all those
living in the Atlanta area to spread the word and to attend.
It is not often that we have the opportunity to meet the leaders
of the political parties in The Gambia. It is important
therefore to make the effort to attend such meetings. It should
not matter whether one supports or not the party Darboe
represents.

LatJor


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:54:59 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp2.erols.com
Subject: Re: new member
Message-ID: <345A6FD3.4446@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gabriel Ndow wrote:
>
> Joseph Jassey has been added to the list. Welcome to our
> bantaba and please send a brief introduction about yourself
> to our group. Our address is: gambia-l@u,washington.edu
>
> LatJorWelcome Joe Jassey
Habib

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:54:16 -0800
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: "c:netscapeMAILSent"@smtp2.erols.com
Subject: Re: new member
Message-ID: <345A6FA8.6270@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

D. Singhateh wrote:
>
> I would like the list managers to enlist mr. Joseph
> Jassey. His email address is: jjassey@MCI.com.
> thanx.Is that the Joseph Jassey I went to school with? St Augustines
(from Cartong/Gungur area) Joe Jassey -RC mission-- ??
How is Vincent Tamba??
This is Habib Diab-Ghanim
my email is hghanin@erols.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 01 Nov 97 15:11:33 EST
From: Mamadi Corra <MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU>
To: Gambia-l <GAMBIA-L@U.WASHINGTON.EDU>
Subject: Town meeting in Atlanta
Message-ID: <199711012016.MAA25896@mx3.u.washington.edu>

Latjor and others that might have attended the town meeting in Atlanta of Mr. D
aboe, would some of you brief us on what happened. Some of us that are not in
Atlanta might benefit from this or might just want to know.
Peace!

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 01 Nov 1997 15:46:45 -0500
From: "Pa-Mambuna O. Bojang" <paomar@iglou.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Darboe's meeting in Atlanta
Message-ID: <345B9535.4CD8@iglou.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Can the Atlantans be kind and brief us about what was discussed at
Darboe's meeting last evening. Either Latjor or Moe does a real good job
on such matters, and I'm sure they would love to brief us about the
event.
GOD BLESS!!

Pa-Mambuna, Lexington

------------------------------

End of GAMBIA-L Digest 92
*************************
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