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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 02 Aug 2018 :  19:59:05  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
What can a person say ? only that a resolution on this very important is reached ,it has been going on for too many years ,I suggest a central registry accessible to everyone for information as to who owns what land,the owner MUST BE VERIFIED BY PAPERWORK and it can no longer be a case of "this land was settled by my forefathers many years ago",verbal history given by someone is no longer acceptable in the 21st Century .
I can understand the reasons why no action has been taken by any administration.Developing a system that is fair and enforceable will be a long and complex task to undertake.
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August 2, 2018


This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia as well as the interventions of Government and Non-governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and (youth) employment.

Improved public awareness and discussion of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency.

In the last editions I indicated that Section 192 of the Constitution states that “There shall be established a Land commission whose composition, functions and powers shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established. But they are yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye column called on the Executive to make the Land Commission functional, to address the series of land disputes in the country.

In the last edition, we started highlighting the Legal recognition and allocation of tenure rights and duties. In this edition, we shall highlight issues on Public land, fisheries and forests.

PUBLIC LAND, FISHERIES AND FORESTS:

Where States own or control land, fisheries and forests, they should determine the use and control of these resources in light of broader social, economic and environmental objectives.

They should ensure that all actions are consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

Where States own or control land, fisheries and forests, the legitimate tenure rights of individuals and communities, including where applicable those with customary tenure systems, should be recognized, respected and protected, consistent with existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

To this end, categories of legitimate tenure rights should be clearly defined and publicized, through a transparent process, and in accordance with national law.

Noting that there are publicly-owned land, fisheries and forests that are collectively used and managed (in some national contexts referred to as commons), States should, where applicable, recognize and protect such publicly-owned land, fisheries and forests and their related systems of collective use and management, including in processes of allocation by the State.

States should strive to establish up-to-date tenure information on land, fisheries and forests that they own or control by creating and maintaining accessible inventories.

Such inventories should record the agencies responsible for administration as well as any legitimate tenure rights held by indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems and the private sector.

Where possible, States should ensure that the publicly-held tenure rights are recorded together with tenure rights of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems and the private sector in a single recording system, or are linked to them by a common framework.

States should determine which of the land, fisheries and forests they own or control will be retained and used by the public sector, and which of these will be allocated for use by others and under what conditions.

States should develop and publicize policies covering the use and control of land, fisheries and forests that are retained by the public sector and should strive to develop policies that promote equitable distribution of benefits from State-owned land, fisheries and forests.

Policies should take into account the tenure rights of others and anyone who could be affected should be included in the consultation process consistent with the principles of consultation and participation of these Guidelines.

The administration of, and transactions concerning, these resources should be undertaken in an effective, transparent and accountable manner in fulfilment of public policies.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy of FAO and CFS.

http://foroyaa.gm/farmerseye-when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 11 Aug 2018 :  12:36:10  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote

Foroyaa keeping up the pressure so this will not go away in the public mind.
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August 9, 2018
This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia, as well as the interventions of Government and Non-Governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both an old and a new source of income and youth employment. Improved public awareness and discussions of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency. Section 192 of the Constitution states: “There shall be established a Lands Commission whose composition, functions and powers, shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established, but it is yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye Column called on the Executive to make this Commission functional, in order to address the series of land disputes in the country, as a major constraint to the development of agriculture and production and Land disputes are on the increased particularly at this time of the year as the rain season is fast approaching.

In the last edition, we started highlighting the issues of public lands, fisheries and forests. In this edition, we shall continue from where we stopped.

PUBLIC LANDS, FISHERIES AND FORESTS:

States should develop and publicize policies covering the allocation of tenure rights to others and, where appropriate, the delegation of responsibilities for tenure governance.

Policies for allocation of tenure rights should be consistent with broader social, economic and environmental objectives.

Local communities that have traditionally used the land, fisheries and forests should receive due consideration in the reallocation of tenure rights.

Policies should take into account the tenure rights of others and anyone who could be affected should be included in the consultation, participation and decision-making processes.

Such policies should ensure that the allocation of tenure rights does not threaten the livelihoods of people by depriving them of their legitimate access to these resources.

States have the power to allocate tenure rights in various forms, from limited use to full ownership.

Policies should recognize the range of tenure rights and right holders. Policies should specify the means of allocation of rights, such as allocation based on historical use or other means.

Where necessary, those who are allocated tenure rights should be provided with support so they can enjoy their rights.

States should determine whether they retain any form of control over land, fisheries and forests that have been allocated.

States should allocate tenure rights and delegate tenure governance in transparent, participatory ways, using simple procedures that are clear, accessible and understandable to all, especially to indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems.

Information in applicable languages should be provided to all potential participants, including through gender-sensitive messages.

Where possible, States should ensure that newly allocated tenure rights are recorded with other tenure rights in a single recording system, or are linked by a common framework.

States and non-state actors should further endeavour to prevent corruption in the allocation of tenure rights.

To the extent that resources permit, States should ensure that competent bodies responsible for land, fisheries and forests have the human, physical, financial and other forms of capacity.

Where responsibilities for tenure governance are delegated, the recipients should receive training and other support so they can perform those responsibilities.

States should monitor the outcome of allocation programmes, including the gender-differentiated impacts on food security and poverty eradication as well as their impacts on social, economic and environmental objectives, and introduce corrective measures as required.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy: FAO, CFS.

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-9/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 11 Aug 2018 12:38:45
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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 07 Sep 2018 :  14:35:05  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
And so it rumbles on and on......
Foroyaa keeping this very important subject in the public eye.

==========================================================================================================

This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia as well as the interventions of Government and Non-governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and (youth) employment.

Improved public awareness and discussion of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector, to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency.

Section 192 of the Constitution states: “There shall be established a Lands Commission whose composition, functions and powers, shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to by the President and the Commission established, but yet to be functional. Farmers’ Eye column calls on the Executive to make the Commission functional, to address the series of land disputes in the country.

In the last edition, we highlighted the issues on indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems. In this edition, we shall continue from where we stopped.

State and non-state actors should strive where necessary, together with representative institutions of affected communities, to provide technical and legal assistance to affected communities to participate in the development of tenure policies, laws and projects in non-discriminatory and gender-sensitive ways.

States should respect and promote customary approaches used by indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems to resolving tenure conflicts within communities consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

For land, fisheries and forests that are used by more than one community, means of resolving conflict between communities should be strengthened or developed.

States and non-state actors should endeavour to prevent corruption in relation to tenure systems of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems, by consultation and participation, and by empowering communities.

INFORMAL TENURE:

Where informal tenure to land, fisheries and forests exists, States should acknowledge it in a manner that respects existing formal rights under national law and in ways that recognize the reality of the situation and promote social, economic and environmental well-being.

States should promote policies and laws to provide recognition to such informal tenure.

The process of establishing these policies and laws should be participatory, gender sensitive and strive to make provision for technical and legal support to affected communities and individuals. In particular, States should acknowledge the emergence of informal tenure arising from large-scale migrations.

States should ensure that all actions regarding informal tenure are consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments, including as appropriate to the right to adequate housing.

Whenever States provide legal recognition to informal tenure, this should be done through participatory, gender-sensitive processes, having particular regard to tenants. In doing so, States should pay special attention to farmers and small-scale food producers.

These processes should facilitate access to legalization services and minimize costs. State should strive to provide technical and legal support to communities and participants.

States should take all appropriate measures to limit the informal tenure that results from overly complex legal and administrative requirements for land use change and development on land.

Development requirements and processes should be clear, simple and affordable to reduce the burden of compliance.

States should endeavour to prevent corruption, particularly through increasing transparency, holding decision-makers accountable, and ensuring that impartial decisions are delivered promptly.

Where it is not possible to provide legal recognition to informal tenure, States should prevent forced evictions that violate existing obligations under national and international law, and consistent with relevant provisions.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy of FAO and CF

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-11/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 03 Jan 2019 :  21:50:58  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Foroyaa, where are you ? This is surely a Burning issue that can ONLY BE RESOLVED by some POLITICAL ACTION.

=============================================================================================================
"Dominic Mendy, a teacher and resident in one of the affected compounds, said he has seen no reason of leaving his compounds, saying he has been occupying the compound since the first republic.

“We are not moving anywhere, this is our place and we have been occupying this place with our families since the first government” he added."

========================================================================
The statement above by Mr Mendy APPEARS to confirm that there is NO PAPER evidence as to the ownership of the land by the current occupants.
Land Desputes have long been a problem in Gambia
=============================================================================================================
Thursday, January 03, 2019 Author: Yusupha Jobe
http://thepoint.gm/africa/gambia/article/over-60-faala-residents-served-with-eviction-order
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Momodou



Denmark
9115 Posts

Posted - 04 Jan 2019 :  21:33:54  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sidia Jatta Calls On Government To Address Land Disputes

Foroyaa: January 4, 2019


By Yankuba Jallow

http://foroyaa.gm/sidia-jatta-calls-on-government-to-address-land-disputes/

Sidia S. Jatta, the National Assembly Member for Wuli West, has called on the Government of the Gambia to address the issue of land disputes in the country.
Jatta said this during the National Assembly Adjournment Debate held on Thursday December 27th 2018.
Sidia told Deputies that the country is faced with land disputes. He said this has brought about hatred among people and the Government is doing nothing about it. The Wuli West Deputy said the issue is becoming serious to the extent that joining two communities for social services, is becoming difficult; that Government cannot provide each and every village with a borehole, and found it useful to join communities to share a borehole. He said the issue is now proving difficult because of land disputes.
Sidia said there is need to amend Section 191 of the Constitution.
Sidia also said there cannot be meaningful development, in the absence of the usage of our local languages for communication. “We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign,” he said.
He called on the Minister of Information and Communication to open up to people, so that they can use the GRTS to teach people in their own languages, and that he is ready to take up that responsibility. “Allocate time, every week 3 hours and we will use it to educate people in their own languages, and then we will move forward with development. If we do not do that, we will move nowhere with development,” he said. Sidia told Deputies that it is the people who matter, when it comes to development and that representatives, make decisions for the people.
“You make a decision and they do not know what you decided for them. Yet we want them to be part of the development process. Is this possible? They must be part and parcel of development. They must conceive development and you cannot do that when you do not take this strange language away,” Jatta said. Jatta said he has colleagues who can do and will be committed to teaching people in their native languages.
“That is what we meant by freedom. Speak your language. We are here promoting English,” he said.
He said the people they are representing need to know what they are saying in the National Assembly. He said the majority of the masses in the country cannot understand English and they are not included in the events at the National Assembly.
Sidia said the country is not going to move without the use of ‘our’ local languages in the country; that the recent enactment of the Bill on Basic and Secondary Education has failed to contain the fundamental things. He pointed out that it is now established that Gambian languages should now be taught in Schools but the Bill has failed to officialise the use of our local languages in these Schools. He added that the writing system to use these languages has been established since 1979, but has never been officialised.
“There should be an Act of the National Assembly that should officialise an autograph for our languages,” he said.

A clear concience fears no accusation - proverb from Sierra Leone
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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2019 :  16:58:29  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Inflammatory language such as "“We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign," is unnecessary and unconsidered.

======================================================================

A glaring FACT remains in that there are VAST numbers of the Gambian population who can neither READ nor Write,therefore to cloud this lands issue with the use of local language MUST be a total non starter.

ENGLISH is the OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF GAMBIA,NOT French, Wollof, Jola,Arabic,Mandinka.

FIRST THINGS FIRST. POLITICAL ACTION MUST BE STARTED NOW !

A discussion open to the GENERAL PUBLIC by the FULL MEMBERSHIP OF THE NA and not only a committee.

Stop going around in circles TAKE ACTION & DO SOMETHING.

quote:
Originally posted by Momodou

Sidia Jatta Calls On Government To Address Land Disputes

Foroyaa: January 4, 2019


By Yankuba Jallow

http://foroyaa.gm/sidia-jatta-calls-on-government-to-address-land-disputes/

Sidia S. Jatta, the National Assembly Member for Wuli West, has called on the Government of the Gambia to address the issue of land disputes in the country.
Jatta said this during the National Assembly Adjournment Debate held on Thursday December 27th 2018.
Sidia told Deputies that the country is faced with land disputes. He said this has brought about hatred among people and the Government is doing nothing about it. The Wuli West Deputy said the issue is becoming serious to the extent that joining two communities for social services, is becoming difficult; that Government cannot provide each and every village with a borehole, and found it useful to join communities to share a borehole. He said the issue is now proving difficult because of land disputes.
Sidia said there is need to amend Section 191 of the Constitution.
Sidia also said there cannot be meaningful development, in the absence of the usage of our local languages for communication. “We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign,” he said.
He called on the Minister of Information and Communication to open up to people, so that they can use the GRTS to teach people in their own languages, and that he is ready to take up that responsibility. “Allocate time, every week 3 hours and we will use it to educate people in their own languages, and then we will move forward with development. If we do not do that, we will move nowhere with development,” he said. Sidia told Deputies that it is the people who matter, when it comes to development and that representatives, make decisions for the people.
“You make a decision and they do not know what you decided for them. Yet we want them to be part of the development process. Is this possible? They must be part and parcel of development. They must conceive development and you cannot do that when you do not take this strange language away,” Jatta said. Jatta said he has colleagues who can do and will be committed to teaching people in their native languages.
“That is what we meant by freedom. Speak your language. We are here promoting English,” he said.
He said the people they are representing need to know what they are saying in the National Assembly. He said the majority of the masses in the country cannot understand English and they are not included in the events at the National Assembly.
Sidia said the country is not going to move without the use of ‘our’ local languages in the country; that the recent enactment of the Bill on Basic and Secondary Education has failed to contain the fundamental things. He pointed out that it is now established that Gambian languages should now be taught in Schools but the Bill has failed to officialise the use of our local languages in these Schools. He added that the writing system to use these languages has been established since 1979, but has never been officialised.
“There should be an Act of the National Assembly that should officialise an autograph for our languages,” he said.


"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 09 Jan 2019 17:18:05
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toubab1020



9579 Posts

Posted - 15 Jan 2019 :  20:15:30  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
January 15, 2019

Members of the Land Commission were sworn in since 17th September 2018. The members are as follows: Justice Raymond Sock as chairperson, Buba Barry, Nancy Nyang, Momodou S. Jobe, and Kemo Conteh as members.

We are yet to see any invitation for press coverage regarding the inauguration of the Commission. Land is a major source of conflict. The Land Commission is one tool that should enable the country to manage and solve land conflicts. The CRC is up and running. What is holding the Land Commission? Foroyaa will approach the Commission for an answer.

http://foroyaa.gm/what-is-happening-to-the-lands-commission/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 15 Jan 2019 20:16:05
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