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 Land! land! land!

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
toubab1020 Posted - 10 Nov 2011 : 15:00:14
All very true, what will happen about this? I will tell you,NOTHING ,why ?TOO MANY BIG PEOPLE ARE INVOLVED,
who are they? I have no idea,to me it appears so obvious,if there was no problem in finding who is behind rip off schemes the problem would have been solved long, long ago.Will anyone on bantaba in cyberspace add input to what I have written,I doubt it,why? because they may have been ripped off themselves and want to save face,or they know so much about who is involved in this scandal that they dare not write about it.Cynical, you bet.

http://thepoint.gm/africa/gambia/article/land-land-land

Land! land! land!
africa » gambia
Wednesday, November 09, 2011

It was not long ago when we stated on these pages that the number of issues pertaining to land in The Gambia is growing day by day.

We have poor coordination, false possession, and people charging high prices for what does not belong to them, to name but a few problems.

One thing that must be understood is that the physical land of The Gambia is for all of us, but possession of land has been beset with problems in recent times.

The next question that must be asked is - who to blame?

Do we lay the blame at the doors of alkalos, surveyors, or the relevant government institutions such as the Department of Physical Planning and the Department of Lands and Surveys?

Whoever is to blame for the problems related to land, the reality is that genuine people who wish to invest their hard-earned money in a piece of property, are increasingly afraid to risk getting involved in land deals.

It is hard to blame them. If you have worked hard and saved money diligently, the last thing you want is for that money to be lost in a dubious land deal.

Unfortunately, the issue of land is becoming a problem in many parts of Africa, so we in Gambia are not alone in our plight.

This said, we should waste no time in addressing the problem. Land in The Gambia now is a burning issue, and people need help, as they are suffering.

We hear of demolitions with time ebbing away in the run up to the rains. What are people to do? If they receive a small compensation, they cannot afford to buy a new house. If they have to build from scratch, they will find themselves and their families without a roof over their heads when the rainy season strikes. We cannot allow this to happen to any of our people.

The Government should make laws and introduce regulations that would ensure this kind of thing does not happen. If there is proper legislation introduced which covers every possible eventuality, it will ensure that no loophole exists to be exploited by anybody.

Along with this action, victims of demolitions must be compensated fully and relocated. Time is running out and the situation is worsening. If swift action is not taken, this terrible trend will worsen before it gets better.

Also prospective investors in land need to remind themselves of the importance of obtaining reliable confirmation and transfer documents from alkalos, and proper advice and guidance from lawyers.

Meanwhile, the Social Security and Housing Finance Corporation (SSHFC) should take another look at its policies, and make land affordable to public servants, the majority of whom cannot afford D100,000 for an empty plot of land, and the further cost of developing the land.

For example, it may be easier for SSHFC to construct houses and then pass them to owner-occupiers on mortgage, as obtains in other countries.

“Men sooner forget the death of their fathers than the loss of their possessions.”

Machiavelli
15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
toubab1020 Posted - 28 Feb 2019 : 08:55:16
February 27, 2019

Frightening developments are beginning to emerge as the Kombo area moves towards development where small land owners are being threatened with eviction under the pretext that their ancestors were just allowed to stay on the land but not to own it.

Having invested all their lives on such land with a traditional land tenure system under which the first to clear the forest are considered to be the owners, how could a state allow such people just to be evicted and become landless families overnight. The state cannot be aloof. It should intervene to create a win-win situation. It could develop a compensation scheme for those with claims to avoid conflict. It should protect those who have settled to avoid conflict. This is the way forward.

http://foroyaa.gm/will-a-good-government-stand-idly-by-and-allow-people-to-become-landless-in-broad-daylight/
toubab1020 Posted - 15 Jan 2019 : 20:15:30
January 15, 2019

Members of the Land Commission were sworn in since 17th September 2018. The members are as follows: Justice Raymond Sock as chairperson, Buba Barry, Nancy Nyang, Momodou S. Jobe, and Kemo Conteh as members.

We are yet to see any invitation for press coverage regarding the inauguration of the Commission. Land is a major source of conflict. The Land Commission is one tool that should enable the country to manage and solve land conflicts. The CRC is up and running. What is holding the Land Commission? Foroyaa will approach the Commission for an answer.

http://foroyaa.gm/what-is-happening-to-the-lands-commission/
toubab1020 Posted - 09 Jan 2019 : 16:58:29
Inflammatory language such as "“We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign," is unnecessary and unconsidered.

======================================================================

A glaring FACT remains in that there are VAST numbers of the Gambian population who can neither READ nor Write,therefore to cloud this lands issue with the use of local language MUST be a total non starter.

ENGLISH is the OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF GAMBIA,NOT French, Wollof, Jola,Arabic,Mandinka.

FIRST THINGS FIRST. POLITICAL ACTION MUST BE STARTED NOW !

A discussion open to the GENERAL PUBLIC by the FULL MEMBERSHIP OF THE NA and not only a committee.

Stop going around in circles TAKE ACTION & DO SOMETHING.

quote:
Originally posted by Momodou

Sidia Jatta Calls On Government To Address Land Disputes

Foroyaa: January 4, 2019


By Yankuba Jallow

http://foroyaa.gm/sidia-jatta-calls-on-government-to-address-land-disputes/

Sidia S. Jatta, the National Assembly Member for Wuli West, has called on the Government of the Gambia to address the issue of land disputes in the country.
Jatta said this during the National Assembly Adjournment Debate held on Thursday December 27th 2018.
Sidia told Deputies that the country is faced with land disputes. He said this has brought about hatred among people and the Government is doing nothing about it. The Wuli West Deputy said the issue is becoming serious to the extent that joining two communities for social services, is becoming difficult; that Government cannot provide each and every village with a borehole, and found it useful to join communities to share a borehole. He said the issue is now proving difficult because of land disputes.
Sidia said there is need to amend Section 191 of the Constitution.
Sidia also said there cannot be meaningful development, in the absence of the usage of our local languages for communication. “We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign,” he said.
He called on the Minister of Information and Communication to open up to people, so that they can use the GRTS to teach people in their own languages, and that he is ready to take up that responsibility. “Allocate time, every week 3 hours and we will use it to educate people in their own languages, and then we will move forward with development. If we do not do that, we will move nowhere with development,” he said. Sidia told Deputies that it is the people who matter, when it comes to development and that representatives, make decisions for the people.
“You make a decision and they do not know what you decided for them. Yet we want them to be part of the development process. Is this possible? They must be part and parcel of development. They must conceive development and you cannot do that when you do not take this strange language away,” Jatta said. Jatta said he has colleagues who can do and will be committed to teaching people in their native languages.
“That is what we meant by freedom. Speak your language. We are here promoting English,” he said.
He said the people they are representing need to know what they are saying in the National Assembly. He said the majority of the masses in the country cannot understand English and they are not included in the events at the National Assembly.
Sidia said the country is not going to move without the use of ‘our’ local languages in the country; that the recent enactment of the Bill on Basic and Secondary Education has failed to contain the fundamental things. He pointed out that it is now established that Gambian languages should now be taught in Schools but the Bill has failed to officialise the use of our local languages in these Schools. He added that the writing system to use these languages has been established since 1979, but has never been officialised.
“There should be an Act of the National Assembly that should officialise an autograph for our languages,” he said.

Momodou Posted - 04 Jan 2019 : 21:33:54
Sidia Jatta Calls On Government To Address Land Disputes

Foroyaa: January 4, 2019


By Yankuba Jallow

http://foroyaa.gm/sidia-jatta-calls-on-government-to-address-land-disputes/

Sidia S. Jatta, the National Assembly Member for Wuli West, has called on the Government of the Gambia to address the issue of land disputes in the country.
Jatta said this during the National Assembly Adjournment Debate held on Thursday December 27th 2018.
Sidia told Deputies that the country is faced with land disputes. He said this has brought about hatred among people and the Government is doing nothing about it. The Wuli West Deputy said the issue is becoming serious to the extent that joining two communities for social services, is becoming difficult; that Government cannot provide each and every village with a borehole, and found it useful to join communities to share a borehole. He said the issue is now proving difficult because of land disputes.
Sidia said there is need to amend Section 191 of the Constitution.
Sidia also said there cannot be meaningful development, in the absence of the usage of our local languages for communication. “We continue to deceive our people that we are representing them. If things continue as they are in this National Assembly, there will be a revolt. I will lead it and we will succeed. We will drive everyone out and people will become free, because that is what they have fought for. They want to be free and we still want to continue deceiving them in this National Assembly speaking in a language that is foreign,” he said.
He called on the Minister of Information and Communication to open up to people, so that they can use the GRTS to teach people in their own languages, and that he is ready to take up that responsibility. “Allocate time, every week 3 hours and we will use it to educate people in their own languages, and then we will move forward with development. If we do not do that, we will move nowhere with development,” he said. Sidia told Deputies that it is the people who matter, when it comes to development and that representatives, make decisions for the people.
“You make a decision and they do not know what you decided for them. Yet we want them to be part of the development process. Is this possible? They must be part and parcel of development. They must conceive development and you cannot do that when you do not take this strange language away,” Jatta said. Jatta said he has colleagues who can do and will be committed to teaching people in their native languages.
“That is what we meant by freedom. Speak your language. We are here promoting English,” he said.
He said the people they are representing need to know what they are saying in the National Assembly. He said the majority of the masses in the country cannot understand English and they are not included in the events at the National Assembly.
Sidia said the country is not going to move without the use of ‘our’ local languages in the country; that the recent enactment of the Bill on Basic and Secondary Education has failed to contain the fundamental things. He pointed out that it is now established that Gambian languages should now be taught in Schools but the Bill has failed to officialise the use of our local languages in these Schools. He added that the writing system to use these languages has been established since 1979, but has never been officialised.
“There should be an Act of the National Assembly that should officialise an autograph for our languages,” he said.
toubab1020 Posted - 03 Jan 2019 : 21:50:58
Foroyaa, where are you ? This is surely a Burning issue that can ONLY BE RESOLVED by some POLITICAL ACTION.

=============================================================================================================
"Dominic Mendy, a teacher and resident in one of the affected compounds, said he has seen no reason of leaving his compounds, saying he has been occupying the compound since the first republic.

“We are not moving anywhere, this is our place and we have been occupying this place with our families since the first government” he added."

========================================================================
The statement above by Mr Mendy APPEARS to confirm that there is NO PAPER evidence as to the ownership of the land by the current occupants.
Land Desputes have long been a problem in Gambia
=============================================================================================================
Thursday, January 03, 2019 Author: Yusupha Jobe
http://thepoint.gm/africa/gambia/article/over-60-faala-residents-served-with-eviction-order
toubab1020 Posted - 07 Sep 2018 : 14:35:05
And so it rumbles on and on......
Foroyaa keeping this very important subject in the public eye.

==========================================================================================================

This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia as well as the interventions of Government and Non-governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and (youth) employment.

Improved public awareness and discussion of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector, to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency.

Section 192 of the Constitution states: “There shall be established a Lands Commission whose composition, functions and powers, shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to by the President and the Commission established, but yet to be functional. Farmers’ Eye column calls on the Executive to make the Commission functional, to address the series of land disputes in the country.

In the last edition, we highlighted the issues on indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems. In this edition, we shall continue from where we stopped.

State and non-state actors should strive where necessary, together with representative institutions of affected communities, to provide technical and legal assistance to affected communities to participate in the development of tenure policies, laws and projects in non-discriminatory and gender-sensitive ways.

States should respect and promote customary approaches used by indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems to resolving tenure conflicts within communities consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

For land, fisheries and forests that are used by more than one community, means of resolving conflict between communities should be strengthened or developed.

States and non-state actors should endeavour to prevent corruption in relation to tenure systems of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems, by consultation and participation, and by empowering communities.

INFORMAL TENURE:

Where informal tenure to land, fisheries and forests exists, States should acknowledge it in a manner that respects existing formal rights under national law and in ways that recognize the reality of the situation and promote social, economic and environmental well-being.

States should promote policies and laws to provide recognition to such informal tenure.

The process of establishing these policies and laws should be participatory, gender sensitive and strive to make provision for technical and legal support to affected communities and individuals. In particular, States should acknowledge the emergence of informal tenure arising from large-scale migrations.

States should ensure that all actions regarding informal tenure are consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments, including as appropriate to the right to adequate housing.

Whenever States provide legal recognition to informal tenure, this should be done through participatory, gender-sensitive processes, having particular regard to tenants. In doing so, States should pay special attention to farmers and small-scale food producers.

These processes should facilitate access to legalization services and minimize costs. State should strive to provide technical and legal support to communities and participants.

States should take all appropriate measures to limit the informal tenure that results from overly complex legal and administrative requirements for land use change and development on land.

Development requirements and processes should be clear, simple and affordable to reduce the burden of compliance.

States should endeavour to prevent corruption, particularly through increasing transparency, holding decision-makers accountable, and ensuring that impartial decisions are delivered promptly.

Where it is not possible to provide legal recognition to informal tenure, States should prevent forced evictions that violate existing obligations under national and international law, and consistent with relevant provisions.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy of FAO and CF

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-11/
toubab1020 Posted - 11 Aug 2018 : 12:36:10

Foroyaa keeping up the pressure so this will not go away in the public mind.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August 9, 2018
This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia, as well as the interventions of Government and Non-Governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both an old and a new source of income and youth employment. Improved public awareness and discussions of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency. Section 192 of the Constitution states: “There shall be established a Lands Commission whose composition, functions and powers, shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established, but it is yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye Column called on the Executive to make this Commission functional, in order to address the series of land disputes in the country, as a major constraint to the development of agriculture and production and Land disputes are on the increased particularly at this time of the year as the rain season is fast approaching.

In the last edition, we started highlighting the issues of public lands, fisheries and forests. In this edition, we shall continue from where we stopped.

PUBLIC LANDS, FISHERIES AND FORESTS:

States should develop and publicize policies covering the allocation of tenure rights to others and, where appropriate, the delegation of responsibilities for tenure governance.

Policies for allocation of tenure rights should be consistent with broader social, economic and environmental objectives.

Local communities that have traditionally used the land, fisheries and forests should receive due consideration in the reallocation of tenure rights.

Policies should take into account the tenure rights of others and anyone who could be affected should be included in the consultation, participation and decision-making processes.

Such policies should ensure that the allocation of tenure rights does not threaten the livelihoods of people by depriving them of their legitimate access to these resources.

States have the power to allocate tenure rights in various forms, from limited use to full ownership.

Policies should recognize the range of tenure rights and right holders. Policies should specify the means of allocation of rights, such as allocation based on historical use or other means.

Where necessary, those who are allocated tenure rights should be provided with support so they can enjoy their rights.

States should determine whether they retain any form of control over land, fisheries and forests that have been allocated.

States should allocate tenure rights and delegate tenure governance in transparent, participatory ways, using simple procedures that are clear, accessible and understandable to all, especially to indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems.

Information in applicable languages should be provided to all potential participants, including through gender-sensitive messages.

Where possible, States should ensure that newly allocated tenure rights are recorded with other tenure rights in a single recording system, or are linked by a common framework.

States and non-state actors should further endeavour to prevent corruption in the allocation of tenure rights.

To the extent that resources permit, States should ensure that competent bodies responsible for land, fisheries and forests have the human, physical, financial and other forms of capacity.

Where responsibilities for tenure governance are delegated, the recipients should receive training and other support so they can perform those responsibilities.

States should monitor the outcome of allocation programmes, including the gender-differentiated impacts on food security and poverty eradication as well as their impacts on social, economic and environmental objectives, and introduce corrective measures as required.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy: FAO, CFS.

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-9/
toubab1020 Posted - 02 Aug 2018 : 19:59:05
What can a person say ? only that a resolution on this very important is reached ,it has been going on for too many years ,I suggest a central registry accessible to everyone for information as to who owns what land,the owner MUST BE VERIFIED BY PAPERWORK and it can no longer be a case of "this land was settled by my forefathers many years ago",verbal history given by someone is no longer acceptable in the 21st Century .
I can understand the reasons why no action has been taken by any administration.Developing a system that is fair and enforceable will be a long and complex task to undertake.
=============================================================================================================================

August 2, 2018


This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia as well as the interventions of Government and Non-governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and (youth) employment.

Improved public awareness and discussion of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency.

In the last editions I indicated that Section 192 of the Constitution states that “There shall be established a Land commission whose composition, functions and powers shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established. But they are yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye column called on the Executive to make the Land Commission functional, to address the series of land disputes in the country.

In the last edition, we started highlighting the Legal recognition and allocation of tenure rights and duties. In this edition, we shall highlight issues on Public land, fisheries and forests.

PUBLIC LAND, FISHERIES AND FORESTS:

Where States own or control land, fisheries and forests, they should determine the use and control of these resources in light of broader social, economic and environmental objectives.

They should ensure that all actions are consistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

Where States own or control land, fisheries and forests, the legitimate tenure rights of individuals and communities, including where applicable those with customary tenure systems, should be recognized, respected and protected, consistent with existing obligations under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

To this end, categories of legitimate tenure rights should be clearly defined and publicized, through a transparent process, and in accordance with national law.

Noting that there are publicly-owned land, fisheries and forests that are collectively used and managed (in some national contexts referred to as commons), States should, where applicable, recognize and protect such publicly-owned land, fisheries and forests and their related systems of collective use and management, including in processes of allocation by the State.

States should strive to establish up-to-date tenure information on land, fisheries and forests that they own or control by creating and maintaining accessible inventories.

Such inventories should record the agencies responsible for administration as well as any legitimate tenure rights held by indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems and the private sector.

Where possible, States should ensure that the publicly-held tenure rights are recorded together with tenure rights of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems and the private sector in a single recording system, or are linked to them by a common framework.

States should determine which of the land, fisheries and forests they own or control will be retained and used by the public sector, and which of these will be allocated for use by others and under what conditions.

States should develop and publicize policies covering the use and control of land, fisheries and forests that are retained by the public sector and should strive to develop policies that promote equitable distribution of benefits from State-owned land, fisheries and forests.

Policies should take into account the tenure rights of others and anyone who could be affected should be included in the consultation process consistent with the principles of consultation and participation of these Guidelines.

The administration of, and transactions concerning, these resources should be undertaken in an effective, transparent and accountable manner in fulfilment of public policies.

Source: Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure. Courtesy of FAO and CFS.

http://foroyaa.gm/farmerseye-when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed/
toubab1020 Posted - 30 Jul 2018 : 18:19:15
By Kebba Secka July 27, 2018

The President of the Gambia, Adama Barrow, on Thursday 26th July told the people of Kombo North that all land issues in the country will be delved into by the Land Commission. He said the government is aware of the 40 land disputes in the country, that is why with the power vested on him by the Constitution, he has set up a Land Commission that would be probing into all disputed land in the country. The president was making these statements in response to the land issues raised by the people of Kombo South.

The President commended the people of Kombo South for their steadfastness throughout the Coalition struggle to end dictatorship in the country that his government’s agenda will not leave them behind. He told the gathering that the National Development Plan has captured most of the issues they have raised that he urged every Gambians to join hand for the development of the country. “We have secured 1.7 billion, this is not a small money, this is a sum that wherever it is spent, even the animals in the country will realise it,’’ he told the gathering. The President highlighted that the Donated Money will attract a kind of development that may be impossible in a period of fifty years.

The president used the occasion to preach the importance of security in a country that without it there cannot development. He advised people to respect the security officers as they are law enforcers; that they need to be given maximum respect in the execution of their duty. He equally advised the security officers to respect the rule of Law and do their utmost best.

Responding to the concerns of the people of Kombo South on health, Dr Isatou Touray said her Ministry is aware of the constraints in the health centers that they will do their utmost best to improve the health system. She said her ministry is aware of the Challenges faced by some health centre in the area that a team of technicians are currently examining the problem. She said they will help to solve their problems. “I know Katong Health Centre has no ambulance with only one community nurse, Tujereng, Banyaka health centres and other health centres in the area, our team of technicians are currently examining the problems and will come up with solution. She also said the MOU signed between some communities and her ministry will also be looked; at that she is a new minister in her post and will need time to look into those issues.

Speaking on behalf of Kombo South, the National Assembly Member for Kombo South Hon. Kebba K Barrow welcomed the president to his constituency but reminded his people that the president’s tour is a requirement by the Constitution that he is fulfilling a requirement of the Constitution. He used the occasion to remind the Ministry of health that in 2017 when they appeared before the National Assembly and he asked them to provide Kombo South with hospital and the answer was, “Every population above 50,000 needs to be given hospital and Kombo South is 106,000,’’ said the majority leader. He also raised the concern of security in the area that the location of his area is a strategic position for criminal from the outside world.

Councillor of the area Babucarr Kanteh said the main occupation of the people of his area is the sea that they appealed to the government to be given storage facilities for fish and their agricultural produce. He also expressed interest in poultry farming and skills centre for the youth. Responding to the concerns, minister of Agriculture said most villages in the area will have five hectares of their lands fenced and water will be irrigated from the sea to enable a year round farming. ‘’Everything on the food plate is agriculture therefore the agricultural system will be mechanized and improve so that it benefits every Gambia,’’ he said.

http://foroyaa.gm/all-land-dispute-to-be-delved-into-by-land-commission/
toubab1020 Posted - 27 Jul 2018 : 11:48:23
Note the foroyaa link above should be as below,

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-8/

Old topics cannot be edited after a designated period of time,my mistake sorry.
toubab1020 Posted - 27 Jul 2018 : 11:43:01
Keeping up the pressure to FINALLY resolve this VERY complicated issue.
===================================================================================================


July 26, 2018
This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security in the Gambia, as well as the interventions of Government and Non-Governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and youth employment. Improved public awareness and discussions of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy, to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed, to ensure food self-sufficiency.

In the last edition, we indicated that Section 192 of the Constitution states that “there shall be established a Lands Commission whose composition, functions and powers, shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”. This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established, but yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye column, calls on the Executive to make the Commission functional, in order to address land disputes within the country, a major constraint in Agriculture and key to production. Land disputes are on the increase particularly at this time of the year, the farming season.

In this edition, we shall highlight the Legal recognition and allocation of Land tenure rights and duties.

LEGAL RECOGNITION AND ALLOCATION OF TENURE RIGHTS AND DUTIES:

This part addresses the governance on land tenure, fisheries and forests, with regard to the legal recognition of the land rights of indigenous peoples and communities, with customary tenure systems, as well as of the informal tenure rights, and the initial allocation of tenure rights to land, fisheries and forests owned or controlled by the public sector.

SAFEGUARDS

When States recognize or allocate tenure rights to land, fisheries and forests, they should establish, in accordance with national laws, safeguards to avoid infringing on or extinguishing tenure rights of others, including legitimate tenure rights that are not currently protected by law.

In particular, safeguards should protect women and the vulnerable who hold subsidiary tenure rights, such as gathering rights.

States should ensure that all actions regarding the legal recognition and allocation of tenure rights and duties are consistent with their existing obligations, under national and international law, and with due regard to voluntary commitments under applicable regional and international instruments.

Where States intend to recognize or allocate tenure rights, they should first identify all existing tenure rights and right holders, whether recorded or not. Indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems, smallholders and anyone else who could be affected should be included in the consultation process.

States should provide access to justice, if people believe their tenure rights are not recognized.

States should ensure that women and men enjoy the same rights in the newly recognized tenure rights, and that those rights are reflected in records. Where possible, legal recognition and allocation of tenure rights of individuals, families and communities should be done systematically, progressing area by area in accordance with national priorities, in order to provide the poor and vulnerable with full opportunities to acquire legal recognition of their tenure rights.

Legal support should be provided, particularly to the poor and vulnerable. Locally appropriate approaches should be used to increase transparency when records of tenure rights are initially created, including in the mapping of tenure rights.

States should ensure that people whose tenure rights are recognized or who are allocated new tenure rights have full knowledge of their rights and also their duties. Where necessary, States should provide support to such people so that they can enjoy their tenure rights and fulfil their duties.

Where it is not possible to provide legal recognition of tenure rights, States should prevent forced evictions that are inconsistent with their existing obligations under national and international law, and in accordance with the principles of these Guidelines.

Foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-8/
toubab1020 Posted - 20 Jul 2018 : 14:48:19
I spelt my comment on this post incorrectly to correct this I have to make a new reply as editing is no longer allowed in such an old topic posting,which as Foroyaa has noted has been going on for years,

Ad infinitium

ad infinitum
#716;ad #618;nf#618;#712;n#652;#618;t#601;m/
adverb
adverb: ad infinitum

again and again in the same way; forever.
"registration is for seven years and may be renewed ad infinitum"
synonyms: forever, for ever and ever, evermore, always, for all time, till the end of time, in perpetuity; More

Lets hope this gets sorted SOON (Maybe or Maybe not )
toubab1020 Posted - 20 Jul 2018 : 14:38:00

ON and On Ad infinatium



This column is devoted to monitor and report on issues that relate to production, processing, preservation and marketing of agricultural produce, aimed at ensuring food security

in the Gambia as well as the interventions of Government and Non-governmental Organizations in this regard.

Agriculture remains both a new and old source of national revenue and youth employment.

Improved public awareness and discussion of the issues involved, will significantly maximize agricultural outcomes and the contribution of the sector to economic growth and job creation.

This is precisely the reason why Farmers’ Eye is critically looking at every Agricultural programme or policy to gauge whether our Agriculture and Natural resources are properly harnessed to ensure food self-sufficiency.

In the last editions we indicated that Section 192 of the Constitution states that “There shall be established a Lands Commission, whose composition, functions and powers shall be prescribed by an Act of the National Assembly”.

This Act has already been passed and assented to and the Commission established, but it is yet to be functional.

Farmers’ Eye Column called on the Executive to make this Commission functional, to address the series of land disputes in the country, highlighted as a major constraint of Agriculture which is key to production. Land disputes are on the increase particularly at this time of the year, when the rain season is in full gear.

In the last edition, we started dealing with the delivery of services. In this edition, we shall continue with the rest.

States and other parties should consider additional measures to support vulnerable or marginalized groups who could not otherwise access administrative and judicial services. These measures should include legal support, such as affordable legal aid, and may also include the provision of services of paralegals or para-surveyors, and mobile services for remote communities and mobile indigenous peoples.

States should encourage implementing agencies and judicial authorities to foster a culture based on service and ethical behavior. Agencies and judicial authorities should seek regular feedback, such as through surveys and focus groups, to raise standards and improve delivery of services, to meet expectations, and to satisfy new needs.

They should publish performance standards and report regularly on results. Users should have means of addressing complaints either within the implementing agency, such as by administrative review, or externally, such as by an independent review or through an ombudsman.

Relevant professional associations for services related to tenure should develop, publicize and monitor the implementation of high levels of ethical behavior. Public and private sector parties should adhere to applicable ethical standards, and be subject to disciplinary action in case of violations. Where such associations do not exist, States should ensure an environment conducive to their establishment.

States and non-state actors should endeavor to prevent corruption with regard to tenure rights. States should do so particularly through consultation and participation, rule of law, transparency and accountability.

States should adopt and enforce anti-corruption measures including applying checks and balances, limiting the arbitrary use of power, addressing conflicts of interest and adopting clear rules and regulations.

States should provide for the administrative and/or judicial review of decisions of implementing agencies. Staff working on the administration of tenure should be held accountable for their actions.

They should be provided with the means of conducting their duties effectively. They should be protected against interference in their duties and from retaliation for reporting acts of corruption.

http://foroyaa.gm/when-will-land-disputes-be-addressed-7/
toubab1020 Posted - 28 Jun 2018 : 17:35:04
I appreciate that MOST of these land rumblings have been going on in the time of the Previous President and things are different these days of the 21st century NEW GAMBIA and maybe it is time to clear away the old ways,,before that happens care must be taaken that everybody is familiar with the new ways,here we are back again to EDUCATION !!
toubab1020 Posted - 28 Jun 2018 : 17:20:10
And have a read of this:

http://www.gambia.dk/snitz3406/pop_printer_friendly.asp?TOPIC_ID=11638

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